In search of infinity

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Fly in league with the night
18 November 2020 – 31 May 2021
Tate Britain, London, UK.

I was pleased to go to this art exhibition soon after it opened at Tate. Mainly because after Christmas the UK went in lockdown for COVID-19 and all art galleries closed. But, you are still in time to visit it if you’re in London because Tate Britain is now open and this show is on until the 31st May.

The artist is Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, a British painter and writer born in London in 1977 to Ghanaian parents, and one of the most aclaimed painters working today. Not surprisingly, as she’s had many years of academic training. She learned to paint from life and changed her approach to painting at an early stage, while studying at Falmouth School of Art, on the Cornish coast. Yiadom-Boakye realised she was less interested in making portraits of people and more in the act of painting itself.

Yiadom-Boakye paints black people, in the most traditional European art form: oil painting on canvas. The painters she admires include: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. And her high level of execution has led her to win prizes such as the prestigious Carnegie Prize in 2018, and to be shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye is well-know for her enigmatic portraits of fictitious people, who live in private worlds. Both familiar and mysterious, they invite viewers to project their own interpretations, and raise important questions of identity and representation. She mentioned in an interview recently that she keeps coming back to the idea of “infinity”.

She takes inspiration from found images, memories, literature and the history of painting. Each painting is an exploration of a different mood, movement and pose, worked out on the surface of the canvas. I see why the artist says her figures aren’t real people, although her source of inspiration seems to be real people. She likes to place the role of narrative in the viewer, and let our imaginations go free when we encounter her works, and that’s not what happens when you see a portrait of someone.

“I write about the things I can’t paint and paint the things I can’t write about.”
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

A writer of prose and poetry as well as a painter, the artist sees both forms of creativity as separate but intertwined, and gives her paintings poetic titles, which she describes as as ‘an extra brush-mark’. However she doesn’t see the titles as an explanation or description, just a way to release our imagination.

We both of The art berries enjoyed this exhibition. The figures on these paintings command your attention, either because of their gaze or the mysteriousness behind the scenes. They were like part of a dream or an old memory that transcends time. The subdued colours at first sight are in some paintings very vibrant, like the things or elements that appear in your dreams.

The artist uses timeless elements in her search for infinity. The enigmatic subjects and sensuality of most of the artworks on display, and the use of only black people on her paintings make them very contemporary, despite the references for her style are so classic.


En busca del infinito
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Vuela en liga con la noche
18 de noviembre de 2020-9 de mayo de 2021
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido.

Me gustó ir a esta exposición de arte poco después de su inauguración en la Tate. Principalmente porque después de Navidad el Reino Unido quedó cerrado for el COVID-19 y todas las galerías de arte cerraron. Pero aún estás a tiempo de visitarla si estás en Londres porque la Tate Britain ya está abierta y esta exposición no cierra hasta el 31 de mayo.

La artista es Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, una pintora y escritora británica nacida en Londres en 1977 de padres ghaneses, y una de las pintoras más aclamadas en la actualidad. No es de extrañar, ya que ha tenido muchos años de formación académica. Aprendió a pintar en vivo y cambió su enfoque de la pintura en una etapa temprana, mientras estudiaba en Falmouth School of Art, en la costa de Cornualles. Yiadom-Boakye se dio cuenta de que estaba menos interesada en hacer retratos de personas y más en el acto de pintar en sí.

Yiadom-Boakye pinta personas de raza negra, en la técnica de pintura europea más tradicional: pintura al óleo sobre lienzo. Los pintores que admira son: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. Y su alto grado de ejecución la ha llevado a ganar premios como el prestigioso Carnegie Prize en 2018, y a ser preseleccionada para el Turner Prize en 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye es conocida por sus enigmáticos retratos de personas ficticias que viven en mundos privados. Tanto familiares como misteriosos, invitan a los espectadores a proyectar sus propias interpretaciones y plantean importantes cuestiones de identidad y representación. Recientemente, mencionó en una entrevista que continua volviendo a la idea de “infinito”.

Se inspira en imágenes encontradas, recuerdos, literatura e historia de la pintura. Cada pintura es una exploración de un estado de ánimo, movimiento y pose diferente, elaborado en la superficie del lienzo. Entiendo por qué la artista dice que sus figuras no son personas reales, aunque parezca que su fuente de inspiración son personas de carne y hueso. Le gusta colocar el papel de la narrativa en el espectador y dejar que nuestra imaginación se libere cuando nos encontramos con sus obras, y eso no es lo que sucede cuando ves un retrato de alguien.

“Escribo sobre las cosas que no puedo pintar y pinto las cosas sobre las que no puedo escribir”.
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Escritora de prosa y poesía, además de pintora, la artista ve ambas formas de creatividad como separadas pero entrelazadas, y le da a sus pinturas títulos poéticos, que describe como “una marca de pincel adicional”. Sin embargo, ella no ve los títulos como una explicación o descripción, solo una forma de liberar nuestra imaginación.

Las dos integrantes de The art berries disfrutamos bastante de esta exposición. Las figuras de estas pinturas llaman tu atención, bien sea por cómo te miran o por el misterio detrás de cada escena. Son como parte de un sueño o un viejo recuerdo que trasciende el tiempo. Los colores tenues a primera vista son en algunas pinturas muy vibrantes, como las cosas o elementos que aparecen en los sueños.

La artista utiliza elementos atemporales en su búsqueda del infinito. Lo cual combinado con el misterio y la sensualidad de la mayoría de las obras de arte expuestas, y el uso únicamente de personas de raza negra en sus pinturas las hacen muy contemporáneas, a pesar de que las referencias de su estilo sean tan clásicas.

The art of resilience in life

María Berrío
Flowered Songs and Broken Currents
6 October – 18 December 2020
Victoria Miro gallery, London, UK

This is an art exhibition I saw at Victoria Miro gallery and is still available to view on Vortic Collect until 18 December 2020. As I came in, the upper galleries were filled with light and colour coming from the artworks created by María Berrío, a Colombian artist based in Brooklyn, NYC. Her works are mostly made with Japanese print paper and reflect on cross-cultural connections and global migration seen through the prism of her own history.

Latin American folklore may come to your mind when you see the colour brightness of these artworks, as well as an uneasy feeling because of the gaze and loneliness of the women represented. In 2019 the artist started researching small fishing villages in Colombia – the country where she was born and raised- and became intrigued by the stories of these villages and their inhabitants. These stories inspired her to imagine her own fishing village in the language of magical realism, a style of fiction that paints a realistic view of the modern world while also adding magical elements. Berrío created this series of artworks to explore the modes of resilience and adaptation that arise out of loss. They depict the women and children that are left behind.

A sense of loss can be perceived out of these artworks, but also a sense of rebirth. For instance, one of my favourite works in this show is ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020, showing a woman about four months pregnant, sitting lonely in a big classical armchair . On one side of the armchair there is a plant and flowers on the window, symbols of rebirth. The sky is blue outside. Children are still being born; there is still hope for the human race. See photos of the artworks below.

Another work from Berrío ‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020, was a bit worrying at first sight. “This nods to our attempts to categorise and frame events, to contain them in a way that enables us to understand them”, says the artist. The two birds in this artwork represent the past and the present. “She grabs the present in her hand, but her past remains beside her, impossible to leave behind.”

My favourite artwork in this art show has no figure on it though. It depicts only a tree ‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020. According to the artist “The beauty and glory of nature is figure enough…By distancing ourselves mentally, technologically, and materially from nature, we not only fail to see nature’s wonder but also our own place in that wonder. We react in shock and horror to discover that we, too, are but one fragment of something far grander than our laughter and sadness. This tree, like all trees – as well as all birds, mountains, stars, and people – will live, die, and be reborn again.” I chose to interact with this artwork because I love trees; they are a symbol of life for me.

I really like the artist’s cyclical perception of the universe, and the way in which she focuses on female strength. This show is like a homage to Latin American women for the endurance and strength they demonstrate on a daily basis. How they are able to overcome all kind of political and sociological events such as migration, poverty and loss and reinvent themselves again.


El arte de la fortaleza humana
María Berrío
Flowered Songs and Broken Currents
6 de octubre – 18 de diciembre de 2020
Galería Victoria Miro, Londres, Reino Unido

Esta es una exposición de arte que ví en la galería Victoria Miro y todavía está disponible para ver en Vortic Collect hasta el 18 de diciembre del 2020. Al entrar, las galerías superiores estaban llenas de luz y color procedente de las obras de arte creadas por María Berrío, artista colombiana ubicada en Brooklyn, Nueva York. Sus obras están hechas en su mayoría con papel japonés y reflejan las conexiones interculturales y la migración global vistas a través del prisma de su propia historia.

El folklore latinoamericano puede venir a tu mente cuando ves la abundancia de colores de estas obras de arte, así como un sentimiento de inquietud por la mirada de soledad de las mujeres representadas. En 2019, la artista comenzó a investigar pequeños pueblos de pescadores en Colombia -el país donde nació y se crió- y se sintió intrigada por las historias de estos pueblos y sus habitantes. Estas historias la inspiraron a imaginar su propio pueblo de pescadores impregnado del lenguaje del realismo mágico, un estilo de ficción que pinta una visión realista del mundo y al mismo tiempo agrega elementos mágicos. Berrío creó esta serie de obras de arte para explorar los modos de resistencia humana y adaptación que surgen de la pérdida. Representan a las mujeres y los niños que se quedan atrás.

Se puede percibir una sensación de pérdida en estas obras de arte, pero también una sensación de renacimiento. Por ejemplo, una de mis obras favoritas es ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020, que muestra a una mujer embarazada de unos cuatro meses, sentada sola en un gran sofa de diseño clásico. A un lado del sillón hay una planta y flores en la ventana, símbolos de renacimiento. Fuera el cielo es azul. Todavía están naciendo niños; todavía hay esperanza para la raza humana. Puedes ver las fotos de las obras de arte más abajo.

Otro trabajo de Berrío ‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020, me pareció un poco inquietante a primera vista. “Esto hace referencia a nuestros intentos de categorizar y enmarcar los eventos, de contenerlos de una manera que nos permita comprenderlos”, dice la artista. Los dos pájaros de esta obra de arte representan el pasado y el presente. “Agarra el presente en su mano, pero su pasado permanece a su lado, imposible de dejar atrás”.

Sin embargo, mi obra preferida en esta muestra no tiene figura. Representa sólo un árbol ‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020. Según la artista “La belleza y la gloria de la naturaleza es figura suficiente … Al distanciarnos mental, tecnológica y materialmente de la naturaleza, no solo dejamos de ver la maravilla de la naturaleza, sino también nuestro propio lugar en esa maravilla. Reaccionamos conmocionados y horrorizados al descubrir que también nosotros somos un fragmento de algo mucho más grandioso que nuestra risa y tristeza. Este árbol, como todos los árboles, así como todos los pájaros, montañas, estrellas y personas, vivirán, morirán y renacerán de nuevo “. Elegí interactuar con esta obra de arte porque me encantan los árboles; son un símbolo de vida para mí.

Me gusta mucho la percepción cíclica del universo que tiene la artista y la forma en que se enfoca en la fortaleza femenina. Esta muestra es como un homenaje a las mujeres latinoamericanas por la resistencia y la fuerza que muestran en el día a día. Cómo son capaces de superar todo tipo de eventos políticos y sociológicos como la migración, la pobreza y la pérdida, y son capaces de reinventarse de nuevo.

María Berrío, ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020
María Berrío, ‘Clouded Infinity’, (Detail) 2020
María Berrío,‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020
María Berrío,‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020
María Berrío,‘Under a Cold Sun’, 2020
María Berrío, ‘Crowned Solitudes’, 2020

Welcome to The art berries blog

The art berries is an art collaboration between me and other friends, who are also art enthusiasts. I’ll be the person posting here, but the other art berries have also a key role in attending the art shows, performing and contributing with art ideas for the photos. We hope you feel as inspired when you see the photos as we did when we took them.

Feel free to contact us and perhaps send us a photo of you visiting an art show with you in the picture. We’ll do a picture selection every month and post the ones we like the most. We hope you enjoy this blog and the arts you see around!