In search of infinity

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Fly in league with the night
18 November 2020 – 31 May 2021
Tate Britain, London, UK.

I was pleased to go to this art exhibition soon after it opened at Tate. Mainly because after Christmas the UK went in lockdown for COVID-19 and all art galleries closed. But, you are still in time to visit it if you’re in London because Tate Britain is now open and this show is on until the 31st May.

The artist is Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, a British painter and writer born in London in 1977 to Ghanaian parents, and one of the most aclaimed painters working today. Not surprisingly, as she’s had many years of academic training. She learned to paint from life and changed her approach to painting at an early stage, while studying at Falmouth School of Art, on the Cornish coast. Yiadom-Boakye realised she was less interested in making portraits of people and more in the act of painting itself.

Yiadom-Boakye paints black people, in the most traditional European art form: oil painting on canvas. The painters she admires include: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. And her high level of execution has led her to win prizes such as the prestigious Carnegie Prize in 2018, and to be shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye is well-know for her enigmatic portraits of fictitious people, who live in private worlds. Both familiar and mysterious, they invite viewers to project their own interpretations, and raise important questions of identity and representation. She mentioned in an interview recently that she keeps coming back to the idea of “infinity”.

She takes inspiration from found images, memories, literature and the history of painting. Each painting is an exploration of a different mood, movement and pose, worked out on the surface of the canvas. I see why the artist says her figures aren’t real people, although her source of inspiration seems to be real people. She likes to place the role of narrative in the viewer, and let our imaginations go free when we encounter her works, and that’s not what happens when you see a portrait of someone.

“I write about the things I can’t paint and paint the things I can’t write about.”
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

A writer of prose and poetry as well as a painter, the artist sees both forms of creativity as separate but intertwined, and gives her paintings poetic titles, which she describes as as ‘an extra brush-mark’. However she doesn’t see the titles as an explanation or description, just a way to release our imagination.

We both of The art berries enjoyed this exhibition. The figures on these paintings command your attention, either because of their gaze or the mysteriousness behind the scenes. They were like part of a dream or an old memory that transcends time. The subdued colours at first sight are in some paintings very vibrant, like the things or elements that appear in your dreams.

The artist uses timeless elements in her search for infinity. The enigmatic subjects and sensuality of most of the artworks on display, and the use of only black people on her paintings make them very contemporary, despite the references for her style are so classic.


En busca del infinito
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Vuela en liga con la noche
18 de noviembre de 2020-9 de mayo de 2021
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido.

Me gustó ir a esta exposición de arte poco después de su inauguración en la Tate. Principalmente porque después de Navidad el Reino Unido quedó cerrado for el COVID-19 y todas las galerías de arte cerraron. Pero aún estás a tiempo de visitarla si estás en Londres porque la Tate Britain ya está abierta y esta exposición no cierra hasta el 31 de mayo.

La artista es Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, una pintora y escritora británica nacida en Londres en 1977 de padres ghaneses, y una de las pintoras más aclamadas en la actualidad. No es de extrañar, ya que ha tenido muchos años de formación académica. Aprendió a pintar en vivo y cambió su enfoque de la pintura en una etapa temprana, mientras estudiaba en Falmouth School of Art, en la costa de Cornualles. Yiadom-Boakye se dio cuenta de que estaba menos interesada en hacer retratos de personas y más en el acto de pintar en sí.

Yiadom-Boakye pinta personas de raza negra, en la técnica de pintura europea más tradicional: pintura al óleo sobre lienzo. Los pintores que admira son: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. Y su alto grado de ejecución la ha llevado a ganar premios como el prestigioso Carnegie Prize en 2018, y a ser preseleccionada para el Turner Prize en 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye es conocida por sus enigmáticos retratos de personas ficticias que viven en mundos privados. Tanto familiares como misteriosos, invitan a los espectadores a proyectar sus propias interpretaciones y plantean importantes cuestiones de identidad y representación. Recientemente, mencionó en una entrevista que continua volviendo a la idea de “infinito”.

Se inspira en imágenes encontradas, recuerdos, literatura e historia de la pintura. Cada pintura es una exploración de un estado de ánimo, movimiento y pose diferente, elaborado en la superficie del lienzo. Entiendo por qué la artista dice que sus figuras no son personas reales, aunque parezca que su fuente de inspiración son personas de carne y hueso. Le gusta colocar el papel de la narrativa en el espectador y dejar que nuestra imaginación se libere cuando nos encontramos con sus obras, y eso no es lo que sucede cuando ves un retrato de alguien.

“Escribo sobre las cosas que no puedo pintar y pinto las cosas sobre las que no puedo escribir”.
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Escritora de prosa y poesía, además de pintora, la artista ve ambas formas de creatividad como separadas pero entrelazadas, y le da a sus pinturas títulos poéticos, que describe como “una marca de pincel adicional”. Sin embargo, ella no ve los títulos como una explicación o descripción, solo una forma de liberar nuestra imaginación.

Las dos integrantes de The art berries disfrutamos bastante de esta exposición. Las figuras de estas pinturas llaman tu atención, bien sea por cómo te miran o por el misterio detrás de cada escena. Son como parte de un sueño o un viejo recuerdo que trasciende el tiempo. Los colores tenues a primera vista son en algunas pinturas muy vibrantes, como las cosas o elementos que aparecen en los sueños.

La artista utiliza elementos atemporales en su búsqueda del infinito. Lo cual combinado con el misterio y la sensualidad de la mayoría de las obras de arte expuestas, y el uso únicamente de personas de raza negra en sus pinturas las hacen muy contemporáneas, a pesar de que las referencias de su estilo sean tan clásicas.

Exploring space with sculpture

Phyllida Barlow
cul-de-sac
23 February – 23 June 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

After nearly two months without posting anything here, I’m finally back! I have a good excuse for being so quiet since January. My son Samuel was born on the 9th February and I have been really busy and enjoying his company since then.

Nevertheless, there’s a good art show now in London that I wanted to share with you. British sculptor Phyllida Barlow has currently an art exhibition at the contemporary galleries of the Royal Academy of Arts, which will be on until the end of the spring. The art berries went to visit it and I’m sharing it with you here, so you don’t miss one of the best art shows in London this season.

The photos you can see from The art berries below have been taken as usual with an iPhone. We’ve interacted with the artworks and bring you an intimate and personal approach of the art pieces we found more interesting.

As we entered the gallery space, we came across two huge sculptures. One of them is a vertical structure formed by various colourful canvases. A playful and intriguing art piece that traps your attention from the very beginning of the exhibition. From the photos below, you can see The art blackberry next to this piece. She appears to be in conversation with a colourful group of individuals.

As we moved along the art show, a new interesting sculpture is revealed. It reminds me of an amphitheatre with a semicircular seating gallery space sustained by multiple beams that go in different directions. You can see how we blend with the sculpture and contribute to this perception.

Finally, a series of pictures are presented below with The art blackberry amid a forest of inclined beams. In this pictures, her fragility is accentuated by the the menacing beams above her.

In February, Barlow created this exhibition that brings her own interpretation of a residential cul-de-sac. By closing the exit door in the final room, Barlow forced the viewer to turn around and revisit each sculpture anew from the other side. She created forests of seemingly precarious structures and uses them to explore the full height of the gallery space with looming beams, blocks and canvases.

Thresholds, the artist has said, are fascinating places, where you pass through from one space to another. Always seeking the surprise, Barlow expects the work to take her into a  journey, rather than her deciding upon that journey.

Her source of inspiration is in the everyday from a farm to an industrial state. Because of that, Barlow uses everyday materials such as plywood, expanding foam, polystyrene, plaster, cement, plastic piping, Polyfilla, tape, etc. and remind us to look at them in a new context with a new light. They are so common in our world that we’ve stopped even seeing them.

Barlow studied at Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) and the Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). She later taught at both schools and was Professor of Fine Art and Director of Undergraduate Studies at the latter until 2009.


Explorando el espacio con escultura

Phyllida Barlow
Callejón sin salida
23 de febrero – 23 de junio de 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

Después de casi dos meses sin publicar nada aquí, ¡por fin estoy de vuelta! Tengo una buena excusa para estar tan callada desde enero. Mi hijo Samuel nació el 9 de febrero y he estado muy liada y disfrutando de su compañía desde entonces.

De cualquier manera, hay una buena exposición de arte ahora en Londres que quería compartir contigo. La escultora británica Phyllida Barlow tiene desde febrero una exposición en las galerías contemporáneas de la Royal Academy of Arts, que estará abierta hasta el final de la primavera. The art berries fuimos a visitarla y la comparto aquí contigo para que no te pierdas una de las mejores muestras de arte en Londres esta temporada.

Las fotos que puedes ver a continuación en The art berries  se han tomado como siempre con un iPhone. Hemos interactuado con las obras de arte y te brindamos un enfoque intimo y personal de las piezas que encontramos más interesantes.

Cuando entramos en el espacio de la galería, nos encontramos con dos esculturas enormes. Una de ellas es una estructura vertical formada por varios lienzos de colores. Una escultura divertida e intrigante que capta tu atención desde el principio de la exposición. En las fotos que capturamos debajo, puedes ver a The art blackberry junto a esta pieza. Parece estar en conversación con un grupo colorido de individuos.

 

A medida que avanzamos en la muestra de arte, aparece una nueva e interesante escultura. Me recuerda a un anfiteatro con un espacio semicircular en la galería de asientos sostenido por múltiples vigas que van en distintas direcciones. Puedes ver como nos mezclamos con la escultura y contribuimos a esta percepción.

Finalmente, a continuación se puede ver una serie de imágenes con The art blackberry en medio de un bosque de vigas inclinadas. En estas imágenes, su fragilidad se ve acentuada por las vigas que hay sobre ella.

En febrero, Barlow creó esta exposición que trae su propia interpretación de un callejón sin salida residencial. Al cerrar la puerta de salida en la sala final, Barlow obligó al espectador a darse la vuelta y volver a visitar cada escultura desde el otro lado. Creó bosques de estructuras aparentemente precarias y las utiliza para explorar la altura completa del espacio de la galería con vigas, bloques y lienzos que parece que se van a caer de un moment a otro.

Los umbrales, ha dicho la artista, son lugares fascinantes, donde se pasa de un espacio a otro. Siempre buscando la sorpresa, Barlow espera que el trabajo la lleve a un viaje, en lugar de que ella decida sobre ese viaje.

Su fuente de inspiración está en lo cotidiano, desde una granja hasta un estado industrial. Debido a eso, Barlow utiliza materiales cotidianos como madera contrachapada, espuma expandida, poliestireno, yeso, cemento, tuberías de plástico, Polyfilla, cinta, etc. y nos recuerdan mirarlos en un nuevo contexto, con una nueva luz. Son tan comunes en nuestro mundo que hemos dejado de verlos.

Barlow estudió en el Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) y en la Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). Más tarde enseñó en ambas escuelas y fue profesora de Bellas Artes y Directora de Estudios de Pre-grado en esta última hasta el 2009.

PB_The art berries_colour blocks2PB_The art berries_colour blocks1PB-The art berries_amphitheatrePB_The art berries_small sculpturePB_The art berries_black1PB_The art berries_black3PB_The art berries_black4PB_The art berries_black2

Breaking moulds in art and in life

Russian Dada 1914–1924
Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
6 June – 22 October 2018

I was pleased to visit this art show a month ago in Madrid, Spain, at the Reina Sofia Museum; the first one I cover out of the UK.

Although the art exhibition felt a bit long because of the number of works on show, about 250, it was really comprehensive and I found it interesting to gain a good perspective of the art created by Russian avant-garde artists during this period, from 1914 to 1924. The show includes paintings, collages, illustrations, sculptures, film projections and publications, and it’s divided in three parts.

Dada or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde that developed in the early 20th century in reaction to World War I and had an early centre in Zurich. The Dada movement rejected the logic, reason and aestheticism of modern capitalist society, expressing irrationality and nonsense protest in their works.

When it comes to Russian Dada, the artworks on show here were produced at the height of Dada’s flourishing, between World War I and the death of Vladimir Lenin, who happened to be a frequent visitor to Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, where this art movement originated. The Russian avant-gardists on show, as well as the rest of Dadaists, supported internationalism and engaged in eccentric practices and pacifist demonstrations.

The first part of the show, and also my favourite, focuses on ‘alogical’ abstraction. As I came into the show I saw photos of some of the Russian Dadaists, in a rather irreverent and playful pose. They were followed by some film projections in black and white, of which I took a snapshot and it’s on show below. One of the sculptures created in this period includes Vladimir Tatlin’s “Complex Corner-Relief” (1915), next to which you can see myself performing for the photo.

TheArtBerries-Tatlin spt

The Art Blueberry performing next to Vladimir Tatlin’s, “Complex Corner-Relief”/”Relieve de esquina complejo” (1915).

One of the hits of this exhibition for me was to see the designs for a stage curtain of the futurist opera “Victory over the Sun” produced by Malevich in 1913 which led him to create his well know “Black Square” in 1915. We cannot see the “Black Square” here, but we can see a design for the curtain for the opera Victory over the Sun and some other variants of it including white squares that are brilliant too.

Kasimir Malevich, “Design for the curtain of the opera Victory over the Sun”/ “Diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol” – left/izq.
The Art Blueberry performing next to Malevich’s work.

Aleksei Morgunov was quoted within the show saying: “In 1914-15 Malevich and I decided that practically all forms of development of the painterly principles that had gone along the trajectory of negation of the created forms, logically brought us to a blank canvas. Our task then to create new forms that have a character of elementary geometric forms. One of such forms was a square.”

Olga Rozanova, “In the Street”/ “En la calle” (1915) – left/izquierda
Aleksei Morgunov, “Composition no. 1″/ “Composición n. 1” – right/derecha.

In collaboration with the musician Mikhail Matyushin and the poet Aleksei Kruchenykh, Malevich did a manifesto calling for the rejection of rational thought. They wanted to change the established systems of Western society. In the opera Victory over the Sun, the characters aimed to abolish reason by capturing the sun and destroying time. Malevich called this Suprematism, and this new movement is all about the supremacy of colour and shape in painting. 

The second section spans the period from 1917 to 1924, from the victory of the Russian Revolution to the death of Vladímir Lenin, touching notions like Internationalism. Malevich’s Suprematism had a strong influence in his contemporaries.  

As such, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaia said on a testimony: “I came to Vitebsk after the October celebrations, but the city still glowed from Malevich’s decorations- of circles, squares, dots, lines of different colours…I felt like I was in a bewitched city, at the time everything was powerful and wonderful.”

We can see Malevich’s influence on Morgunov’s design for the cover of the journal ‘The International of Art’, and on “The New Man” from Litsitzki on show below.

Aleksei Morgunov, Unpublished cover of the journal The International of Art, 1919 / Portada inedita de la revista Internacional de arte – left/izq.
El Lisitzski, “The New Man”/ “El hombre nuevo” (1920-1923) – right/dcha.

The final section explores the connections between Russia and two of the main Dada centres, Paris and Berlin, with works from Russian artists in those two cities and the presence of artists like Lissitsky in Berlin, and Sergei Sharshun and Ilia Zdanevich in Paris.

The nihilistic zeitgeist that followed the Great War originated Dada, and the Marxism of the Russian Revolution agreed in principle with their ideals. The artists often pushed the Dadaesque into Russian mass culture, in the form of absurdist and chance-based designs. Their goal was to cause the death of art. But, failing to do that, they mostly became artists who managed to break moulds and created great works of art.


Rompiendo moldes en la vida y el arte
Dada ruso 1914-1924
Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, España
6 de junio – 22 de octubre de 2018

Me gustó visitar esta exposición de arte hace un mes en Madrid, España, en el Museo Reina Sofía; el primero que cubro fuera del Reino Unido.

Aunque la exposición me pareció un poco larga debido a la cantidad de obras expuestas, alrededor de 250, fue bastante exhaustiva y me pareció interesante lograr una buena perspectiva del arte creado por los artistas vanguardistas rusos durante este período, de 1914 a 1924. La muestra incluye pinturas, collages, ilustraciones, esculturas, proyecciones de películas y publicaciones, y está dividido en tres partes.

Dada o Dadaism fue un movimiento de arte de la vanguardia europea que se desarrolló a principios del siglo XX en reacción a la Primera Guerra Mundial y tuvo un centro temprano en Zurich. El movimiento Dada rechazó la lógica, la razón y el esteticismo de la sociedad capitalista moderna, expresando irracionalidad y protestas absurdas en sus obras.

En lo que respecta al Dada ruso, las obras expuestas aquí se produjeron en el apogeo del florecimiento de Dada, entre la Primera Guerra Mundial y la muerte de Vladimir Lenin, que solía frecuentar el Cabaret Voltaire en Zurich, donde se originó este movimiento artístico.  Los dadaístas rusos en exposición, así como el resto de los dadaístas, apoyaron el internacionalismo y se involucraron en prácticas excéntricas y manifestaciones pacifistas.

La primera parte de la exposición, y también mi favorita, se centra en la abstracción ‘alógica’. Al entrar en la muestra, se pueden ver fotos de algunos de los dadaístas rusos, en una actitud bastante irreverente. En la siguiente sala hay algunas proyecciones de películas en blanco y negro, de las cuales también tomé una instantánea que se muestra a continuación. Una de las esculturas creadas en este período incluye “Relieve de esquina complejo“ de Vladimir Tatlin (1915), junto a la cual puedes verme posando para la foto.

TheArtBerries-Tatlin spt

The Art Blueberry performing next to Vladimir Tatlin’s, “Complex Corner-Relief”/”Relieve de esquina complejo” (1915).

Uno de los éxitos de esta exposición para mí fue ver los diseños del telón de escenario de la ópera futurista “Victoria sobre el sol”, producida por Malevich en 1913, que le llevó a crear su bien conocido “Black Square“ en 1915. No podemos ver la obra “Black Square” aquí, pero podemos ver un diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol y algunas otras variantes, incluyendo cuadros blancos y negros que me parecen estupendos. Se me puede ver posando junto a uno de ellos a continuación.

Kasimir Malevich, “Design for the curtain of the opera Victory over the Sun”/ “Diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol” – left/izq.
The Art Blueberry performing next to Malevich’s work.

Aleksei Morgunov fue citado dentro de la exposición diciendo: “En 1914-15, Malevich y yo decidimos que prácticamente todas los principios pictóricos que habían evolucionado a través de la negación de las formas anteriores nos conducían necesariamente al lienzo vacío. Nuestra tarea entonces consistía en crear formas nuevas que conservaran el carácter de las formas geométricas elementales. Una de esas formas era el cuadrado “.

Olga Rozanova, “In the Street”/ “En la calle” (1915) – left/izquierda
Aleksei Morgunov, “Composition no. 1″/ “Composición n. 1” – right/derecha.

En colaboración con el músico Mikhail Matyushin y el poeta Aleksei Kruchenykh, Malevich hizo un manifiesto llamando al rechazo del pensamiento racional. Querían cambiar los sistemas establecidos de la sociedad occidental. En la ópera “Victoria sobre el Sol”, los personajes intentaron abolir la razón capturando el sol y destruyendo el tiempo. Malevich llamó a esto Suprematismo, y este nuevo movimiento tiene que ver con la supremacía del color y la forma en la pintura.

La segunda sección abarca el período comprendido entre 1917 y 1924, desde la victoria de la Revolución Rusa hasta la muerte de Vladímir Lenin, que frecuentó Cabaret Voltaire en Zurich, tocando nociones como el internacionalismo. El suprematismo de Malevich tuvo una fuerte influencia en sus contemporáneos.

Como tal, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaia dijo en un testimonio: “Llegué a Vitebsk después de las celebraciones de Octubre, pero la ciudad aún brillaba por las decoraciones de Malevich: círculos, cuadrados, puntos y líneas de diferentes colores … Sentí que me encontraba en una ciudad embrujada, en ese momento todo era posible y maravilloso.”

Podemos ver esta influencia de Malevich en el diseño de Morgunov para la portada de la revista ‘The International of Art’, y en ‘The New Man’ de Litsitzki que se muestra a continuación.

Aleksei Morgunov, Unpublished cover of the journal The International of Art, 1919 / Portada inedita de la revista Internacional de arte – left/izq.
El Lisitzski, “The New Man”/ “El hombre nuevo” (1920-1923) – right/dcha.

La sección final explora las conexiones entre Rusia y dos de los principales centros Dada, París y Berlín, con obras de artistas rusos en esas dos ciudades y la presencia de artistas como Lissitsky en Berlín y Sergei Sharshun e Ilia Zdanevich en París.

El espíritu de la época nihilista que siguió a la Gran Guerra originó a Dadá y el marxismo de la Revolución rusa comulgaba en principio con sus ideales. Los artistas a menudo empujaban al dadaismo hacia la cultura de masas rusa, con forma de diseños absurdos y basados ​​en el azar. Su objetivo era causar la muerte del arte. Pero, al no hacer eso, en su mayoría se convirtieron en artistas que consiguieron romper moldes y crear grandes obras de arte.

The struggle in all artistic pursuits

Franz West
Sisyphos sculptures
Gagosian, Davies Street, London, UK
June 8 – July 27, 2018

In Greek mythology Sisyphus or Sisyphos was the first king of Ephyra, who was punished by Zeus for his deceitfulness and proudness and forced to roll a heavy boulder up a steep hill, only for it to roll down when it nears the top, repeating this action for eternity.

The last art exhibition there was at the Gagosian in Davies Street, London, by Franz West (Vienna, 1947 – Vienna, 2012) referred to the myth told above. The show ended last week, so you’ll have to see these artworks somewhere else they travel to. But, I wanted to share them with you nevertheless, because I think that the sculptures are beautiful and I like the photos we did when we performed at the art space.

Belonging to a generation of artists exposed to the Actionist and Performance Art of the 1960s and 70s, Franz West rejected the idea of a passive relationship between artwork and viewer. He investigated the dichotomy between private and public, action and reaction, both in and outside the gallery, and used everyday materials and imagery to examine art’s relation to social experience.

The Sisyphus myth the artist referred to with this show at the Gagosian gallery is an exploration of the unrelenting frustration of the creative process, the struggle involved in all artistic pursuits that artists and creative people in general are so familiar with.

Franz West unconventional sculpures often require an involvement of the audience, so they are the perfect example of artworks The art berries like to perform with. The ones where the artist encourages the interaction and don’t see our performance as an interference in their work. Having said that, I do believe that everyone should be free to interact with art and enjoy the arts as they please, as long as the artworks are respected. And that is indeed one of the missions of The art berries project.

For the photos displayed here we played with the notions of hide and exposure frequently touched by the artist in his career. Also by lying on the floor, we seem to be resting from the Sisyphean creative struggle. Only for a moment!


La lucha en todas las actividades artísticas

Franz West
Esculturas de Sísifo
Gagosian, Davies Street, Londres, Reino Unido
8 de junio – 27 de julio de 2018

En la mitología griega, Sísifo o Sisyphos fue el primer rey de Ephyra, que fue castigado por Zeus por su comportamiento engañoso y su orgullo, y obligado a rodar una pesada roca por una colina empinada, solo para que ruede cuando se acerca a la cima, repitiendo esta acción por toda la eternidad.

La última exposición de arte que hubo en la galería Gagosian de Londres del artista Franz West (Viena, 1947 – Viena, 2012) se refería al mito mencionado anteriormente. La muestra terminó la semana pasada, por lo que tendrás que ver estas obras de arte en otra galería o museo al que viajen. Pero, quería compartirlas contigo, porque creo que las esculturas son bonitas y me gustan las fotos resultantes de la interacción con las esculturas en este espacio.

Perteneciente a una generación de artistas expuestos al Actionist y Performance Art de los años 60 y 70, Franz West rechazó la idea de una relación pasiva entre obra de arte y espectador. Investigó la dicotomía entre lo privado y lo público, la acción y la reacción, tanto dentro como fuera de la galería, y utilizó materiales e imágenes cotidianas para examinar la relación del arte con la experiencia social.

El mito de Sísifo al que el artista se refirió con esta exposición en la galería Gagosian es una exploración de la frustración del proceso creativo, la lucha permanente que rodea a todas las actividades artísticas con las que los artistas y las personas creativas en general estamos tan familiarizados.

 

Las esculturas no convencionales de Franz West a menudo requieren la participación de la audiencia, por lo que son el ejemplo perfecto de obras de arte con las que nos gusta hacer un ‘performance’ a The art berries. Aquellas en los que el artista fomenta la interacción y no ve nuestro ‘perfomance’ como una interferencia en su trabajo. Habiendo dicho eso, creo que el público debería ser libre de interactuar con el arte y disfrutar del arte como le plazca, siempre y cuando se respeten las obras de arte. Y esa es de echo una de las misiones del proyecto The art berries.

Para las fotos que se muestran aquí, jugamos con las nociones de ocultar y mostrar que con frecuencia tocó el artista en su carrera. También al tumbarnos en el suelo parece que descansamos de la lucha creativa de Sísifo. Sólo por un momento!

Franz West - TheartblueberryFranz West - big sculpure