Skinning past memories

Heidi Bucher
19 September – 9 December 2018
Parasol Unit gallery, London, UK

The art berries were visiting a couple of weeks ago the Parasol Unit in London, and discovered the work made by Heidi Bucher (1926-1993), a Swiss artist who was interested in exploring architectural space and the body through sculpture. This is apparently the first time her work is displayed in a public gallery 25 years after her death.

I really enjoyed to see the various pieces presented on both floors of this gallery, which may sound very much in tune with what I say about most art exhibitions we visit, but it must be because we choose to see good art exhibitions to bring you the best art on show.

Heidi Bücher was born in Winterthur, Switzerland, and attended the School for the Applied Arts in Zurich. She collaborated in the early 1970’s with her husband and sculptor Carl Bucher. Her early early work was mainly focused on the body and we can see some of these pieces on the screenings of films documenting her work. One of the art pieces showed on the screening is “Bodyshells” that was showcased in an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, now known as the Museum of Art and Design in NYC. This 8mm footage shows various figures covered in big foam costumes and moving slowly across the beach in LA. Their interaction with the surroundings changed completely when dressing like that.

However, the most impressive artworks on shows at this exhibition are the series of Bucher’s large-scale latex “Skinnings”, as she liked to call them. Bucher became more interested in the body’s relationship to space in her later work. In the mid-70s she started experimenting with a new technique, consisting in soaking gauze sheets in latex rubber and using them to cast room interiors, objects, clothing and the human body. We can see on the film projected on the small room downstairs that the peeling-off process from the original surfaces was like a performance on its own because of the physical strength required and the meaning implied.

These works present a haunting imprint of an architectural surface and the peeling-off process seems to represent a liberation from these memories.

TAB_Heidi Bucher blackberryTAB_Heidi Bucher blueberry

In contrast, the works displayed on the first-floor of the gallery are more related to impermanence and fragility. The artist reflected on concepts such as ephemerality, transformation and metamorphosis. We could see latex costume-objects such as the wings of a dragonfly on “Libellenkleid” (1976), next to which we can see The art blackberry on one of our photos below, as well as various examples of beautiful dresses that can potentially transform the wearer into someone else. Likewise the water related artwork on show on the terrace and on the ground-floor seem to be more in consonance with these notions of ephemerality.

TAB_Heidi Bucher dragonfly

It is great to see her artistic process on the videos and the different avenues she used to explore the ideas that concerned her the most. All of them embodied of superb aesthetic power.


Despellejando recuerdos del pasado
Heidi Bucher
19 de septiembre – 9 de diciembre de 2018
Parasol Unit gallery, Londres, Reino Unido

The art berries estuvimos hace un par de semanas visitando la galería Parasol Unit en Londres, donde descubrimos la obra de Heidi Bucher (1926-1993), una artista suiza que estaba interesada en explorar el espacio arquitectónico y el cuerpo a través de la escultura. Aparentemente, esta es la primera vez que su trabajo se exhibe en una galería pública 25 años después de su muerte.

Me encantó ver las diversas piezas presentadas en ambos pisos de esta galería, que pueden sonar muy en sintonía con lo que digo acerca de la mayoría de las exposiciones de arte que visito, pero debe ser porque elegimos ver buenas muestras de arte para brindarte el mejor arte en exposición.

Heidi Bücher nació en Winterthur, Suiza, y asistió a la Escuela de Artes Aplicadas de Zurich. Colaboró ​​a principios de la década de 1970 con su esposo y escultor Carl Bucher. Sus primeros trabajos tempranos se centraron principalmente en el cuerpo y podemos ver algunas de estas piezas en las proyecciones de películas que documentan su trabajo.  Una de las piezas de arte que se muestran en la proyección es “Bodyshells” que se exhibió en una exposición en el Museo de Artesanía Contemporánea, ahora conocido como el Museo de Arte y Diseño en Nueva York. Este video de 8 mm muestra varias figuras cubiertas con grandes disfraces de espuma y avanzando lentamente por la playa en Los Ángeles. Su interacción con el entorno circundante cambiaba por completo al ir así vestidos.

Sin embargo, las obras de arte más impresionantes de esta exhibición son las series de látex a gran escala “Skinnings”, como a Bucher le gustaba llamarlas. Bucher se interesó más en la relación del cuerpo con el espacio en su trabajo posterior. A mediados de los años 70, comenzó a experimentar con una nueva técnica, que consistía en remojar láminas de gasa en látex y usarlas para moldear interiores de interiores, objetos, ropa y el cuerpo humano. Podemos ver en la película que se muestran en una pequeña habitación en la planta baja que el proceso de desprendimiento fue como una performance en sí misma debido a la fuerza física requerida y el significado implícito.

TAB_Heidi Bucher blackberryTAB_Heidi Bucher blueberry

Estas obras se presentan como una huella evocativa de una superficie arquitectónica y el proceso de desprendimiento parece representar una liberación de estos recuerdos.

 

 

En contraste, las obras que se muestran en el primer piso de la galería están más relacionadas con impermanencia y fragilidad. La artista reflexionó sobre conceptos como transformación y metamorfosis. Podríamos ver los disfraces de látex, como las alas de una libélula en “Libellenkleid” (1976), junto al cual podemos ver El arte blackberry en una de nuestras fotos de abajo, así como varios ejemplos de hermosos vestidos que pueden transformar el portador en otra persona. Del mismo modo, las obras de arte relacionadas con el agua que se muestran en la terraza y en la planta baja parecen estar más en consonancia con esas nociones de arte efímero.

TAB_Heidi Bucher dragonfly

Es genial ver su proceso artístico en los videos y las diferentes vías que utilizó para explorar las ideas que más le interesaban. Todos ellas poseedoras de excelente poder estético.

Sculptures at the royal park

Frieze Sculpture 2018
July – 7 October
Regent’s Park, London, UK

If you live in London or you happen to pass by before the 7th October, don’t miss the “Frieze Sculpture 2018” art show there’s at the moment in Regent’s Park. You’ll see a great selection of large scale sculptures made by artists from around the world.

Regent’s Park, an English garden with a strong French influence, is for second time hosting this year’s Frieze sculpture; the perfect scenery for these sculptures. Featuring the artworks from 25 artists from five continents and presented by leading galleries the show has been on for about three months, and you still have it on for a few more days.

The art berries were there and would like to bring you a new and personal interpretation of the artworks with our photos. This is the selection I’ve done of it and I hope you enjoy it.

One of our favourites was the sculpture “No. 814” (2018) from Rana Begum (b.1977, Bangladesh). The artist created a colourful stained-glass structure that reflects the changing light and colour and creates an ever changing experience in interaction with it. And very much in line with this sculpture is the work presented by  Dan Graham (b. 1942, USA) called London Rococo (2012) that consists of a glass pavilion that becomes activated by visitors when entering it, as we The art berries did.

TheArtBerries-Rana Begum1TheArtBerries-Rana Begum2

TheArtBerries-Dan Graham1

We could also see a big penguin from John Baldessari (b.1931, USA) who plays with our preconceptions and represents himself as a penguin, six feet and seven inches tall. Also Tim Etchells’s (b. 1962, UK) new text-based work, “Everything is Lost”, where a loose constellation is presented against the landscape, and the phrase enacts the content of the work, where the letter are considered already lost.

I was also intrigued by Laura Ford’s (b. 1961, UK) sculpture named “Dancing Clog Girls I-III” (2015) made in bronze. It reminded me of an old fairy-tales at first sight, but with a bit of a sinister feeling, as I see some sort of roots growing from their clogs into the earth that would stop them from running away.

TheArtBerries-Laura Ford 1

And then among many others, we liked the sculpture from Kimsooja (b.1957, South Korea) called “A needle woman: Galaxy was a Memory, Earth is a Souvenir” (2014). The 14-metre-high needle woman structure uses a needle as an intersection between distance and memory threading across a cosmic scale.

TheArtBerries-Kimsooja1

The artworks this year were selected and placed by Clare Lilley, Director of Programme, Yorkshire Sculpture Park. The full list of artists presenting sculptures this year include: Larry Achiampong, John Baldessari, Rana Begum, Yoan Capote, James Capper, Elmgreen & Dragset, Tracey Emin, Tim Etchells, Rachel Feinstein, Barry Flanagan, Laura Ford, Dan Graham, Haroon Gunn-Salie, Bharti Kher, Kimsooja, Michele Mathison, Virginia Overton, Simon Periton, Kathleen Ryan, Sean Scully, Conrad Shawcross, Monika Sosnowska, Kiki Smith, Hugo Wilson and Richard Woods.

Long live the arts in touch with nature!


Esculturas en el parque real
Escultura Frieze 2018
Julio – 7 octubre
Regent’s Park, Londres, Reino Unido

Si vives en Londres o pasas antes del 7 de octubre, no te pierdas la muestra de arte “Frieze Sculpture 2018” que hay ahora en Regent’s Park. Podrás ver una gran selección de esculturas a gran escala hechas por artistas de todo el mundo.

Regent’s Park es uno de los jardines reales de gran influencia francesa que por segunda vez alberga la escultura Frieze de este año; el escenario perfecto para estas esculturas. Con las obras de arte de 25 artistas de los cinco continentes y presentado por las principales galerías, la exposición lleva abierta durante aproximadamente tres meses y es gratis. Todavía estás a tiempo si no la has visto porque aún le quedan unos días más antes de que lo quiten.

The art berries estuvieron allí y me gustaría traerte una interpretación nueva y personal de las obras de arte con nuestra intervención. Esta es la selección que he hecho de ella y espero que la disfrutes.

Uno de nuestras favoritos fue la escultura “No. 814 ”(2018) de Rana Begum (b.1977, Bangladesh). La artista creó una colorida estructura de vidrio que refleja los cambios de luz y color y crea una experiencia siempre cambiante en la interacción con ella. Y muy en línea con esta escultura, está el trabajo presentado por Dan Graham (nacido en 1942, EE. UU.) llamado London Rococo (2012) que consiste en un pabellón de vidrio que se activa cuando los visitantes entran en el e interactuar, como hicimos nosotras, The art berries.

TheArtBerries-Rana Begum1TheArtBerries-Rana Begum2

TheArtBerries-Dan Graham1

También pudimos ver un gran pingüino de John Baldessari (b.1931, EE. UU.) Que juega con ideas preconcebidas y presentándose a sí mismo como un pingüino, de seis pies y siete pulgadas de alto. También el nuevo trabajo de Tim Etchells (n. 1962, Reino Unido), “Everything is Lost”, donde se presenta una constelación suelta de letras contra el paisaje, y la frase representa el contenido de la obra, donde la carta ya se considera perdida.

Entre otras, me intrigó ver la escultura de Laura Ford (n. 1961, Reino Unido) llamada “Dancing Clog Girls I-III” (2015) hecha en bronce. Me recordó a un viejo cuento de hadas a primera vista, pero me dejo una impresión un poco siniestra al ver una especie de raíces que crecen desde sus zuecos hasta la tierra y les impide moverse libremente.

TheArtBerries-Laura Ford 1

Y luego, entre muchos otros, nos gustó la escultura de Kimsooja (b.1957, Corea del Sur) llamada “Una aguja woman: La galaxia era una memoria, la Tierra es un recuerdo” (2014). La estructura de agujas de 14 metros de altura utiliza una aguja como una intersección entre la distancia y la memoria cosiendo a escala cósmica.

TheArtBerries-Kimsooja1

Las obras de arte de este año fueron seleccionadas y colocadas por Clare Lilley, Directora de Programas, Yorkshire Sculpture Park. La lista completa de artistas que presentan esculturas este año incluye: Larry Achiampong, John Baldessari, Rana Begum, Yoan Capote, James Capper, Elmgreen & Dragset, Tracey Emin, Tim Etchells, Rachel Feinstein, Barry Flanagan, Laura Ford, Dan Graham, Haroon Gunn -Salie, Bharti Kher, Kimsooja, Michele Mathison, Virginia Overton, Simon Periton, Kathleen Ryan, Sean Scully, Conrad Shawcross, Monika Sosnowska, Kiki Smith, Hugo Wilson y Richard Woods.

¡Viva el arte en contacto con la naturaleza!

For more information on the Frieze Sculpture 2018 art exhibition check this link.

Breaking moulds in art and in life

Russian Dada 1914–1924
Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
6 June – 22 October 2018

I was pleased to visit this art show a month ago in Madrid, Spain, at the Reina Sofia Museum; the first one I cover out of the UK.

Although the art exhibition felt a bit long because of the number of works on show, about 250, it was really comprehensive and I found it interesting to gain a good perspective of the art created by Russian avant-garde artists during this period, from 1914 to 1924. The show includes paintings, collages, illustrations, sculptures, film projections and publications, and it’s divided in three parts.

Dada or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde that developed in the early 20th century in reaction to World War I and had an early centre in Zurich. The Dada movement rejected the logic, reason and aestheticism of modern capitalist society, expressing irrationality and nonsense protest in their works.

When it comes to Russian Dada, the artworks on show here were produced at the height of Dada’s flourishing, between World War I and the death of Vladimir Lenin, who happened to be a frequent visitor to Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, where this art movement originated. The Russian avant-gardists on show, as well as the rest of Dadaists, supported internationalism and engaged in eccentric practices and pacifist demonstrations.

The first part of the show, and also my favourite, focuses on ‘alogical’ abstraction. As I came into the show I saw photos of some of the Russian Dadaists, in a rather irreverent and playful pose. They were followed by some film projections in black and white, of which I took a snapshot and it’s on show below. One of the sculptures created in this period includes Vladimir Tatlin’s “Complex Corner-Relief” (1915), next to which you can see myself performing for the photo.

TheArtBerries-Tatlin spt

The Art Blueberry performing next to Vladimir Tatlin’s, “Complex Corner-Relief”/”Relieve de esquina complejo” (1915).

One of the hits of this exhibition for me was to see the designs for a stage curtain of the futurist opera “Victory over the Sun” produced by Malevich in 1913 which led him to create his well know “Black Square” in 1915. We cannot see the “Black Square” here, but we can see a design for the curtain for the opera Victory over the Sun and some other variants of it including white squares that are brilliant too.

Kasimir Malevich, “Design for the curtain of the opera Victory over the Sun”/ “Diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol” – left/izq.
The Art Blueberry performing next to Malevich’s work.

Aleksei Morgunov was quoted within the show saying: “In 1914-15 Malevich and I decided that practically all forms of development of the painterly principles that had gone along the trajectory of negation of the created forms, logically brought us to a blank canvas. Our task then to create new forms that have a character of elementary geometric forms. One of such forms was a square.”

Olga Rozanova, “In the Street”/ “En la calle” (1915) – left/izquierda
Aleksei Morgunov, “Composition no. 1″/ “Composición n. 1” – right/derecha.

In collaboration with the musician Mikhail Matyushin and the poet Aleksei Kruchenykh, Malevich did a manifesto calling for the rejection of rational thought. They wanted to change the established systems of Western society. In the opera Victory over the Sun, the characters aimed to abolish reason by capturing the sun and destroying time. Malevich called this Suprematism, and this new movement is all about the supremacy of colour and shape in painting. 

The second section spans the period from 1917 to 1924, from the victory of the Russian Revolution to the death of Vladímir Lenin, touching notions like Internationalism. Malevich’s Suprematism had a strong influence in his contemporaries.  

As such, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaia said on a testimony: “I came to Vitebsk after the October celebrations, but the city still glowed from Malevich’s decorations- of circles, squares, dots, lines of different colours…I felt like I was in a bewitched city, at the time everything was powerful and wonderful.”

We can see Malevich’s influence on Morgunov’s design for the cover of the journal ‘The International of Art’, and on “The New Man” from Litsitzki on show below.

Aleksei Morgunov, Unpublished cover of the journal The International of Art, 1919 / Portada inedita de la revista Internacional de arte – left/izq.
El Lisitzski, “The New Man”/ “El hombre nuevo” (1920-1923) – right/dcha.

The final section explores the connections between Russia and two of the main Dada centres, Paris and Berlin, with works from Russian artists in those two cities and the presence of artists like Lissitsky in Berlin, and Sergei Sharshun and Ilia Zdanevich in Paris.

The nihilistic zeitgeist that followed the Great War originated Dada, and the Marxism of the Russian Revolution agreed in principle with their ideals. The artists often pushed the Dadaesque into Russian mass culture, in the form of absurdist and chance-based designs. Their goal was to cause the death of art. But, failing to do that, they mostly became artists who managed to break moulds and created great works of art.


Rompiendo moldes en la vida y el arte
Dada ruso 1914-1924
Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, España
6 de junio – 22 de octubre de 2018

Me gustó visitar esta exposición de arte hace un mes en Madrid, España, en el Museo Reina Sofía; el primero que cubro fuera del Reino Unido.

Aunque la exposición me pareció un poco larga debido a la cantidad de obras expuestas, alrededor de 250, fue bastante exhaustiva y me pareció interesante lograr una buena perspectiva del arte creado por los artistas vanguardistas rusos durante este período, de 1914 a 1924. La muestra incluye pinturas, collages, ilustraciones, esculturas, proyecciones de películas y publicaciones, y está dividido en tres partes.

Dada o Dadaism fue un movimiento de arte de la vanguardia europea que se desarrolló a principios del siglo XX en reacción a la Primera Guerra Mundial y tuvo un centro temprano en Zurich. El movimiento Dada rechazó la lógica, la razón y el esteticismo de la sociedad capitalista moderna, expresando irracionalidad y protestas absurdas en sus obras.

En lo que respecta al Dada ruso, las obras expuestas aquí se produjeron en el apogeo del florecimiento de Dada, entre la Primera Guerra Mundial y la muerte de Vladimir Lenin, que solía frecuentar el Cabaret Voltaire en Zurich, donde se originó este movimiento artístico.  Los dadaístas rusos en exposición, así como el resto de los dadaístas, apoyaron el internacionalismo y se involucraron en prácticas excéntricas y manifestaciones pacifistas.

La primera parte de la exposición, y también mi favorita, se centra en la abstracción ‘alógica’. Al entrar en la muestra, se pueden ver fotos de algunos de los dadaístas rusos, en una actitud bastante irreverente. En la siguiente sala hay algunas proyecciones de películas en blanco y negro, de las cuales también tomé una instantánea que se muestra a continuación. Una de las esculturas creadas en este período incluye “Relieve de esquina complejo“ de Vladimir Tatlin (1915), junto a la cual puedes verme posando para la foto.

TheArtBerries-Tatlin spt

The Art Blueberry performing next to Vladimir Tatlin’s, “Complex Corner-Relief”/”Relieve de esquina complejo” (1915).

Uno de los éxitos de esta exposición para mí fue ver los diseños del telón de escenario de la ópera futurista “Victoria sobre el sol”, producida por Malevich en 1913, que le llevó a crear su bien conocido “Black Square“ en 1915. No podemos ver la obra “Black Square” aquí, pero podemos ver un diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol y algunas otras variantes, incluyendo cuadros blancos y negros que me parecen estupendos. Se me puede ver posando junto a uno de ellos a continuación.

Kasimir Malevich, “Design for the curtain of the opera Victory over the Sun”/ “Diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol” – left/izq.
The Art Blueberry performing next to Malevich’s work.

Aleksei Morgunov fue citado dentro de la exposición diciendo: “En 1914-15, Malevich y yo decidimos que prácticamente todas los principios pictóricos que habían evolucionado a través de la negación de las formas anteriores nos conducían necesariamente al lienzo vacío. Nuestra tarea entonces consistía en crear formas nuevas que conservaran el carácter de las formas geométricas elementales. Una de esas formas era el cuadrado “.

Olga Rozanova, “In the Street”/ “En la calle” (1915) – left/izquierda
Aleksei Morgunov, “Composition no. 1″/ “Composición n. 1” – right/derecha.

En colaboración con el músico Mikhail Matyushin y el poeta Aleksei Kruchenykh, Malevich hizo un manifiesto llamando al rechazo del pensamiento racional. Querían cambiar los sistemas establecidos de la sociedad occidental. En la ópera “Victoria sobre el Sol”, los personajes intentaron abolir la razón capturando el sol y destruyendo el tiempo. Malevich llamó a esto Suprematismo, y este nuevo movimiento tiene que ver con la supremacía del color y la forma en la pintura.

La segunda sección abarca el período comprendido entre 1917 y 1924, desde la victoria de la Revolución Rusa hasta la muerte de Vladímir Lenin, que frecuentó Cabaret Voltaire en Zurich, tocando nociones como el internacionalismo. El suprematismo de Malevich tuvo una fuerte influencia en sus contemporáneos.

Como tal, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaia dijo en un testimonio: “Llegué a Vitebsk después de las celebraciones de Octubre, pero la ciudad aún brillaba por las decoraciones de Malevich: círculos, cuadrados, puntos y líneas de diferentes colores … Sentí que me encontraba en una ciudad embrujada, en ese momento todo era posible y maravilloso.”

Podemos ver esta influencia de Malevich en el diseño de Morgunov para la portada de la revista ‘The International of Art’, y en ‘The New Man’ de Litsitzki que se muestra a continuación.

Aleksei Morgunov, Unpublished cover of the journal The International of Art, 1919 / Portada inedita de la revista Internacional de arte – left/izq.
El Lisitzski, “The New Man”/ “El hombre nuevo” (1920-1923) – right/dcha.

La sección final explora las conexiones entre Rusia y dos de los principales centros Dada, París y Berlín, con obras de artistas rusos en esas dos ciudades y la presencia de artistas como Lissitsky en Berlín y Sergei Sharshun e Ilia Zdanevich en París.

El espíritu de la época nihilista que siguió a la Gran Guerra originó a Dadá y el marxismo de la Revolución rusa comulgaba en principio con sus ideales. Los artistas a menudo empujaban al dadaismo hacia la cultura de masas rusa, con forma de diseños absurdos y basados ​​en el azar. Su objetivo era causar la muerte del arte. Pero, al no hacer eso, en su mayoría se convirtieron en artistas que consiguieron romper moldes y crear grandes obras de arte.

A modern new language in sculpture

New Generation Sculpture
Tate Britain, London, UK
Until 4 November 2018

I’ve been out of London for nearly three weeks in Spain, reason for which I haven’t been very active here. Now I’d like to briefly cover one of the exhibitions on display at Tate Britain and lasting until the beginning of November. It’s the “New Generation Sculpture” display that focuses on a group of artists who in the 1960s embraced a new language to express themselves in sculpture, turning away from conventional techniques of carving and modelling and traditional materials. They changed stone, clay, wood or bronze to start using modern materials, including fibreglass or plastic sheeting. Moreover, their work was mostly abstract rather than figurative.

Many of this artists first came to public attention through “The New Generation” show, a series of exhibitions held at the Whitechapel Gallery in London in the 1960s. The second of these exhibitions featured David Annesley, Michael Bolus, Phillip King, Tim Scott, William Tucker and Isaac Witkin in the spring of 1965. All of them had studied under Anthony Caro at St. Martin’s School of Art, who had encouraged them to pioneer an innovative approach with the use of modern and industrial materials as well as presenting their works directly on the floor, without the use of a plinth.

From all the works displayed on the “New Generation Sculpture” show at Tate Britain, I particularly liked the “Tra-La-La” sculpture from Phillip King (1963), where I blended with the artwork.

King began to use fibreglass in the early 1960s to make coloured sculptures for the new possibilities offered by this material that allowed him to mould new shapes and structures in a completely new manner. Not only that, he was strongly interested in the way colour can communicate with the audience. He selected colour from more than four hundred pieces of paper that he attached to the sculpture to help him choose the final one. That is what I call ‘accuracy’!

See more images on this exhibition here.

A new review on “Russian Dada” coming up soon based on the exhibition currently on show at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid, Spain.


Un nuevo lenguaje moderno en escultura
Escultura de nueva generación
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido
Hasta el 4 de noviembre de 2018

He estado fuera de Londres durante casi tres semanas en España, por lo que no he estado muy activa aquí. Me gustaría cubrir brevemente una de las muestras que pueden verse ahora en Tate Britain y que durará hasta principios de noviembre. Es la exposición “New Generation Sculpture” que se enfoca en un grupo de artistas que en la década de 1960 abrazaron un nuevo lenguaje para expresarse en escultura, alejándose de las técnicas convencionales de tallado y modelado y materiales tradicional. Cambiaron piedra, arcilla, madera o bronce para comenzar a usar materiales modernos, como fibra de vidrio o láminas de plástico. Además, su trabajo fue principalmente abstracto en lugar de figurativo.

Muchos de estos artistas llegaron a la atención pública por primera vez a través de la muestra “The New Generation”, una serie de exposiciones que tuvo lugar en la Whitechapel Gallery de Londres en la década de 1960. La segunda de estas exhibiciones contó con la participación de David Annesley, Michael Bolus, Phillip King, Tim Scott, William Tucker e Isaac Witkin en la primavera de 1965. Todos ellos habían estudiado con Anthony Caro en la St. Martin’s School of Art, quien los había alentado a usar un enfoque innovador con el uso de materiales modernos e industriales y la presentación de sus obras directamente en el suelo, sin el uso de un zócalo.

De todas las obras expuestas en Tate Britain en este momento parte de “New Generation Sculpture”, me gustó especialmente la escultura “Tra-La-La” de Phillip King (1963), donde me mezclé con la obra de arte.

King comenzó a usar fibra de vidrio en la década de 1960 para hacer esculturas de colores por las nuevas posibilidades que ofrece este material que le permitieron moldear nuevas formas y estructuras de una manera completamente nueva. No solo eso, estaba muy interesado en la forma en que el color se comunica con la audiencia. Seleccionaba el color de más de cuatrocientas piezas de papel que colgaba en la escultura para ayudarle a elegir el color final. ¡Eso es lo que llamo ‘precisión’!

Vea más imágenes de esta exposición aquí.

Pronto estará disponible en este espacio una nueva crítica sobre “Dada ruso” basada en la exposición que actualmente se exhibe en el Museo Reina Sofía de Madrid, España.

The art berries-Phillip King2

The sacredness and vulnerability of all living forms

Current art exhibition: Paloma Varga Weisz
Wild Bunch
Sadie Coles HQ, London, UK
9 June – 24 August 2018

It was a real pleasure to see the work of Paloma Varga Weisz recently at the Sadie Coles gallery in London. I enjoy discovering artists with such a high level of craftsmanship and precision on their work, who manage to inspire the audience so much by bringing them into their private micro-universes.

As we went into the gallery space, the first thing that came into view was a puppet made of limewood hanging from the ceiling. A life-sized naked body that hangs helplessly on ropes in the air. He has an expression of abandonment and vulnerability.

The central piece described above is surrounded by smaller figures displayed in a rather traditional manner on top of small plinths attached to the wall. This allows you to appreciate the works at closer distance and see how textured and tactile they are. It’s even possible to smell the wood, as if they had been recently cast by the artist. The space invite you to silence and reflection.

The experience resembles that of entering a medieval church where all the sacred figures are displayed on little plinths for pilgrims to worship; only that in this case all figures are pagan. In a close inspection we can appreciate some of them are like magical anthropomorphic figures, odd hybrid forms usually loaded with personal and collective motifs. We seem to venerate here the sacredness in all living forms.

Varga Weisz is a sculptor and draughtswoman who was trained in traditional techniques of woodcarving, modelling and casting in Bavaria before attending art school in Düsseldorf in the 1990s. She lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany.

For this art exhibition at Sadie Coles, we only present one photo with The art berries merging with the artworks. The art blackberry further enhances the air of vulnerability and abandonment of the central figure by joining it on the floor like if we were contemplating a group of artworks, well composed.

Interested in craftsmanship? Read the art review and see the photos I did a few months ago on the latest art show of Martin Puryear at Parasol Unit, London.


La sacralidad y vulnerabilidad de todas las formas de vida
Paloma Varga Weisz
Wild Bunch
Sadie Coles HQ, Londres, Reino Unido
9 de junio – 24 de agosto de 2018

Fue un verdadero placer ver recientemente el trabajo de Paloma Varga Weisz en la galería Sadie Coles en Londres. Me encanta descubrir artistas con un alto nivel de artesanía y precisión en su trabajo, que logran llevar al público a su micro-universo e inspirar a su audiencia.

Según entramos en el espacio de la galería, lo primero que se ve es una marioneta hecha de tilo colgando del techo. Un cuerpo desnudo de tamaño natural que cuelga impotente de cuerdas en el aire con expresión de abandono y vulnerabilidad.

La pieza central descrita arriba está rodeada por figuras más pequeñas que se muestran de manera bastante tradicional sobre pequeños pedestals pegados a la pared. Esto te permite apreciar los trabajos a una distancia más cercana y apreciar su textura y tactilidad. Incluso es posible oler la madera, como si hubieran sido esculpidos recientemente por el artista. El espacio te invita al silencio y la reflexión.

La experiencia se asemeja a la de entrar en una iglesia medieval donde todas las figuras sagradas se muestran en pequeños pedestales para ser adoradas por sus peregrinos; solo que en este caso todas las figuras son paganas. En una inspección minuciosa podemos apreciar que algunos de ellos son como figuras antropomórficas mágicas, extrañas formas híbridas generalmente cargadas de motivos personales y colectivos. Parece que veneramos aquí lo sagrado en todas las formas de vida.

Varga Weisz es una escultora y dibujante que se entrenó en técnicas tradicionales de tallado en madera, modelado y fundición en Baviera antes de asistir a la escuela de arte en Düsseldorf en la década de 1990. Vive y trabaja en Düsseldorf, Alemania.

Para esta exposición de arte en Sadie Coles, sólo presentamos una foto de The art berries fusionándonos con las obras de arte. The art blackberry realza aún más el aire de vulnerabilidad y abandono de la figura central uniéndose en el suelo. Parece que estuviéramos contemplando un grupo de obras de arte, bien compuesto.

Interesado en la artesanía? Lee la reseña de arte y mira las fotos que hice hace unos meses en la última muestra de arte de Martin Puryear en Parasol Unit, Londres.

Paloma Varga Weisz-The art blackberry

Paloma Varga Weisz-Sadie Coles 1Paloma Varga Weisz-human-lambPaloma Varga Weisz-multiple-breastsPaloma Varga Weisz-monkey

The struggle in all artistic pursuits

Franz West
Sisyphos sculptures
Gagosian, Davies Street, London, UK
June 8 – July 27, 2018

In Greek mythology Sisyphus or Sisyphos was the first king of Ephyra, who was punished by Zeus for his deceitfulness and proudness and forced to roll a heavy boulder up a steep hill, only for it to roll down when it nears the top, repeating this action for eternity.

The last art exhibition there was at the Gagosian in Davies Street, London, by Franz West (Vienna, 1947 – Vienna, 2012) referred to the myth told above. The show ended last week, so you’ll have to see these artworks somewhere else they travel to. But, I wanted to share them with you nevertheless, because I think that the sculptures are beautiful and I like the photos we did when we performed at the art space.

Belonging to a generation of artists exposed to the Actionist and Performance Art of the 1960s and 70s, Franz West rejected the idea of a passive relationship between artwork and viewer. He investigated the dichotomy between private and public, action and reaction, both in and outside the gallery, and used everyday materials and imagery to examine art’s relation to social experience.

The Sisyphus myth the artist referred to with this show at the Gagosian gallery is an exploration of the unrelenting frustration of the creative process, the struggle involved in all artistic pursuits that artists and creative people in general are so familiar with.

Franz West unconventional sculpures often require an involvement of the audience, so they are the perfect example of artworks The art berries like to perform with. The ones where the artist encourages the interaction and don’t see our performance as an interference in their work. Having said that, I do believe that everyone should be free to interact with art and enjoy the arts as they please, as long as the artworks are respected. And that is indeed one of the missions of The art berries project.

For the photos displayed here we played with the notions of hide and exposure frequently touched by the artist in his career. Also by lying on the floor, we seem to be resting from the Sisyphean creative struggle. Only for a moment!


La lucha en todas las actividades artísticas

Franz West
Esculturas de Sísifo
Gagosian, Davies Street, Londres, Reino Unido
8 de junio – 27 de julio de 2018

En la mitología griega, Sísifo o Sisyphos fue el primer rey de Ephyra, que fue castigado por Zeus por su comportamiento engañoso y su orgullo, y obligado a rodar una pesada roca por una colina empinada, solo para que ruede cuando se acerca a la cima, repitiendo esta acción por toda la eternidad.

La última exposición de arte que hubo en la galería Gagosian de Londres del artista Franz West (Viena, 1947 – Viena, 2012) se refería al mito mencionado anteriormente. La muestra terminó la semana pasada, por lo que tendrás que ver estas obras de arte en otra galería o museo al que viajen. Pero, quería compartirlas contigo, porque creo que las esculturas son bonitas y me gustan las fotos resultantes de la interacción con las esculturas en este espacio.

Perteneciente a una generación de artistas expuestos al Actionist y Performance Art de los años 60 y 70, Franz West rechazó la idea de una relación pasiva entre obra de arte y espectador. Investigó la dicotomía entre lo privado y lo público, la acción y la reacción, tanto dentro como fuera de la galería, y utilizó materiales e imágenes cotidianas para examinar la relación del arte con la experiencia social.

El mito de Sísifo al que el artista se refirió con esta exposición en la galería Gagosian es una exploración de la frustración del proceso creativo, la lucha permanente que rodea a todas las actividades artísticas con las que los artistas y las personas creativas en general estamos tan familiarizados.

 

Las esculturas no convencionales de Franz West a menudo requieren la participación de la audiencia, por lo que son el ejemplo perfecto de obras de arte con las que nos gusta hacer un ‘performance’ a The art berries. Aquellas en los que el artista fomenta la interacción y no ve nuestro ‘perfomance’ como una interferencia en su trabajo. Habiendo dicho eso, creo que el público debería ser libre de interactuar con el arte y disfrutar del arte como le plazca, siempre y cuando se respeten las obras de arte. Y esa es de echo una de las misiones del proyecto The art berries.

Para las fotos que se muestran aquí, jugamos con las nociones de ocultar y mostrar que con frecuencia tocó el artista en su carrera. También al tumbarnos en el suelo parece que descansamos de la lucha creativa de Sísifo. Sólo por un momento!

Franz West - TheartblueberryFranz West - big sculpure

Shared memories in colour

Howard Hodgkin
Last Paintings
Gagosian, Grovenor Hill, London
June 1 – July 28, 2018

The Gagosian gallery at Grosvenor Hill is now showing a show of Howard Hodgkin, a widely known British contemporary painter I first discovered with an exhibition there was at Tate Britain, London, in 2006. That show spanned his entire career from the 1950s, despite he wasn’t celebrated as a major figure in British art until the 1970s, but it revealed the early development of his visual language. The memory I keep of it is that it was a fest for the senses due to the vibrancy of the colours and expressiveness of the artworks.

The current exhibition at the Gagosian gallery showcases the final six paintings he completed in India before he died in March 2017, including more than twenty other paintings never displayed before in Europe. I was pleased to see his work again, and the final evolution of it as a gold brooch to the show I saw at Tate more than ten years ago.

Despite his work seems abstract at first sight, Hodgkin stated clearly that he wasn’t an abstract painter. The artist did a a continuos exploration of the representation of emotions, personal encounters and above all, memories of specific experiences that the viewer can relate with going back to his/her own experiences.

In an interview with Kenneth Baker in the Summer of 2016 Hodgkin said: “I can’t control the viewer. But I tell them what the picture’s about, always. I’ve never painted an abstract picture in my life. I can’t.”

He showed a passionate commitment to subject and said also in this interview that it’s when the physical reality is established that the subject can begin to show itself. But, he lamented that people didn’t usually see that his pictures where made of shape, drawing and composition.

Shared memories are a key part in his work. And it was very insightful to read the title of the works to know what he had in mind when he made a new painting. That reading was very evocative to me with some works. Like the painting titled “Portrait of the artist listening to music” displayed below, or the one titled “Darkness at noon” where The art raspberry performs as if she were a sculpture in the shadow.

Although we both liked most paintings, my favourite paintings didn’t necessarily coincide with the ones loved by The art raspberry. And, therefore, each of us performed with the ones we liked the most. In some cases, adding a new interpretation. Like with the work titled “Don’t tell a soul”, where mi position in front of the green brushstrokes over yellow seem to suggest “The birth of an idea” or “A moment of inspiration”. Finally, with the painting “Love song” I felt like a butterfly over some flowers and I truly felt connected to it.

Hodgkin represented Britain at the Venice Biennale in 1984 and received the Turner Prize in 1985. In addition, he was included by the newspaper The Independent in a list of the 100 most influential gay people in Britain.


Recuerdos compartidos en color
Howard Hodgkin
Últimas pinturas
Gagosian, Grovenor Hill, Londres
1 de junio – 28 de julio de 2018

La galería Gagosian en Grosvenor Hill, Londres, muestra ahora una exposición de Howard Hodgkin, un pintor británico ampliamente conocido que discubrí por primera vez con una exposición en Tate Britain, Londres, en 2006. Esa muestra abarcaba toda su carrera desde la década de 1950, a pesar de que no fue celebrado como una figura importante en el arte británico hasta la década de 1970, pero revelaba el desarrollo temprano de su lenguaje visual. El recuerdo que guardo de esta muestra es que fue un festival para los sentidos gracias a la vitalidad de los colores y la expresividad de las obras de arte.

La muestra que hay ahora en la galería Gagosian expone las últimas seis pinturas que completó en la India antes de morir en marzo de 2017, incluyendo más de veinte pinturas que nunca antes se habían expuesto en Europa. Me gustó ver su trabajo de nuevo, y la evolución final de este como un broche de oro para la exposición que vi en Tate hace más de diez años.

A pesar de que su trabajo parece abstracto a primera vista, Hodgkin afirmó claramente que no era un pintor abstracto. El artista realizó una exploración continua de la representación de emociones, encuentros personales y, sobre todo, recuerdos de experiencias con las que el espectador puede identificarse fijándose en sus propias experiencias.

En una entrevista con Kenneth Baker en el verano de 2016, Hodgkin dijo: “No puedo controlar al espectador. Pero les digo de qué se trata la imagen, siempre. Nunca he pintado una imagen abstracta en mi vida. No puedo “.

Mostró un compromiso apasionado con el sujeto pictórico y dijo también en esta entrevista que cuando se establece la realidad física es cuando dicho sujeto puede comenzar a mostrarse. Pero, se lamentó de que la gente no suele ver que sus imágenes están hechas de forma, dibujo y composición.

Los recuerdos compartidos son una parte clave de su trabajo. Y fue muy interesante leer el título de las obras para saber lo que él tenía en mente cuando hizo una nueva pintura. Esa lectura fue muy evocadora para mí con algunas obras. Como la pintura titulada “Retrato del artista que escucha música” que se muestra abajo, o la que se titula “Oscuridad al mediodía” donde The art raspberry actúa como si fuera una escultura en la sombra.

Aunque a los dos nos gustaron la mayoría de las pinturas, mis pinturas preferidas no coincidieron necesariamente con las que le gustaron a ella. Cada una hizo su ‘peformance’ con la obras con las que mas conectó en aquel momento. En algunos casos, añadiendo una nueva interpretación. Al igual que con el trabajo titulado “No le digas a un alma”, donde mi posición delante de las pinceladas verdes sobre amarillo parecen sugerir “El nacimiento de una idea” o “Un momento de inspiración”. Finalmente, con la pintura “Canción de amor” me sentí como una mariposa sobre algunas flores y me sentí conectada con la pintura.

Hodgkin representó a Gran Bretaña en la Bienal de Venecia en 1984 y recibió el Premio Turner en 1985. Además, fue incluido por el periódico The Independent en una lista de los 100 gays más influyentes en Gran Bretaña.

Howard Hodgkins-The art raspberry

The art raspberry performing next to “Darkness at noon” (2015-2016).

Howard Hodgkin-The art blueberry2Howard Hodgkin-The art blueberry1Howard Hodgkin-The art blueberry3

The art blueberry performing next to “Love song” (2015).

Howard Hodgkin-Red sky at night

Painting above: “Red sky at night” (2001-2011).

Howard Hodgkin-red sky in the morning

Painting above: “Red sky in the morning” (2016).

Howard Hodgkin-Darkness at noon

Painting above: “Darkness at noon” (2015-2016).

Howard Hodgkin-Indian veg

Painting above: “Indian veg” (2013 – 2014).