Marvellous evocative sculptures

Cy Twombly
Sculpture
30 September – 21 December, 2019
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

This is a past art exhibition there was at the Gagosian art gallery in London at the end of last year. I’d to talk about it here because I didn’t have the time to do it while it was on and I really like this artist.

As we came into the gallery, we were surrounded by multiple sculpture pieces spread all over the two main gallery spaces. Many of Twombly’s sculptures are coated in white paint and are evocative of classical sculptures, where white is his “marble”. Some of them allude to architecture, geometry, and Egyptian and Mesopotamian statuary, as in the rectangular pedestals and circular structures.

Twombly made these sculptures on show out of found materials such as plaster, wood and iron. They are mostly modest in scale and can be easily associated to his paintings. The white paint over these materials gives them a very interesting texture that even tempted me to touch them.

As well as his paintings, the sculptures evoke narratives from antiquity and fragments of literature and poetry. However, as the artist said in an interview with David Sylvester for his exhibition at Kunstmuseum Basel in 2000, the demands of making sculpture were very different from those of painting. “[Sculpture is] a whole other state. And it’s a building thing. Whereas the painting is more fusing—fusing of ideas, fusing of feelings, fusing projected on atmosphere.” It seems to me that he envisioned sculpture more like a LEGO figure, whereas painting was more like a recipe in which you mix different ingredients to create a new dish.

Apart from the white sculptures, we came across others colours. A few of the sculptures were pink and we found that it was the perfect tone of pink for my colleague, The art blackberry, to interact with the artworks because she was wearing a coat with the same pink. The aesthetical qualities of these pictures can be appreciated below.

I hope we get to see a new art show on Cy Twombly’s painting or sculpture soon. I enjoyed looking at his sculptures, but I always enjoy his paintings more because they have more readings to me. But, of course, this is a personal preference you may not agree with. The last Twombly’s art show I really enjoyed was back in 2011 at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, where he was exhibited alongside Poussin, an artist deeply admired by him.


 

Maravillosas esculturas evocadoras

Cy Twombly
Escultura
30 de septiembre – 21 de diciembre de 2019
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, Londres

Esta es una exposición de arte pasada que hubo en la galería Gagosian en Londres a finales del año pasado. Me gustaría hablar sobre ella aquí, porque no tuve tiempo de hacerlo mientras estaba abierta, y me gusta este artista.

Según entramos en la galería, nos sentimos rodeadas de múltiples piezas de escultura repartidas por los dos espacios principales de la galería. Muchas de las esculturas de Twombly están recubiertas de pintura blanca, y evocan esculturas clásicas donde el blanco es su “mármol”. Algunas de ellas aluden a la arquitectura, la geometría y las estatuas egipcias y mesopotámicas, como en los pedestales rectangulares y las estructuras circulares.

Twombly hizo estas esculturas en exposición con materiales encontrados como yeso, madera y hierro. En su mayoría son de escala modesta y se pueden asociar fácilmente a sus pinturas. La pintura blanca sobre estos materiales les da una textura muy interesante que parece invitarnos a tocarlas. 

Además de sus pinturas, las esculturas evocan narrativas de la antigüedad y fragmentos de literatura y poesía. Sin embargo, como dijo el artista en una entrevista con David Sylvester para su exposición en el Kunstmuseum Basel en 2000, las demandas de hacer esculturas eran muy diferentes de las de la pintura. “[La escultura es] un estado completamente diferente. Tiene que ver con construcción. Mientras que la pintura se fusiona más: fusión de ideas, fusión de sentimientos, fusión proyectada en la atmósfera “. Parece que imaginó la escultura más como una figura de LEGO, mientras que la pintura era más como una receta donde se mezclan diferentes ingredientes para crear un nuevo plato.

Además de las esculturas blancas, encontramos otros colores. Algunas de las esculturas eran de color rosa y descubrimos que era el tono rosado perfecto para mi colega, The art blackberry, para interactuar con las obras de arte porque llevaba un abrigo del mismo color rosa. Las cualidades estéticas de estas imágenes se pueden apreciar a continuación.

Espero que podamos ver una nueva muestra de arte de pintura o escultura de Cy Twombly pronto. Disfruté viendo sus esculturas, pero siempre disfruto más de sus pinturas porque tienen más lecturas para mí. Por supuesto, esto es una preferencia personal con la que puedes no estar de acuerdo. La última muestra de arte de Twombly que realmente disfruté fue en 2011 en la Dulwich Picture Gallery, donde fue expuesto junto a Poussin, un artista profundamente admirado por Twombly.

Capturing the mood of the moment

Turner Prize
26 September 2018 – 6 January 2019
Tate Britain, London, UK

If you’re in London this Christmas and would like to see an art exhibition, the Turner Prize is worth to pay a visit. What is one of the best-known prizes for visual arts in the world is formed entirely by film, video and moving image this year. So, if you want to see the four art pieces presented in full you’d have to count on over 4,5 hours. But, I’d say we didn’t spend that long at this exhibition. The medium allows you to be flexible with how you experience it, and it doesn’t have to be as lineal as when we go to the cinema.

I was not surprised about finding the same type of work on the four pieces shown this year. It does capture the mood of the present moment by using moving image for a political purpose.

As it is presented, there are four rooms connected by a central space filled in with sofas and printed material that reminds you a bit of a dentist waiting room. Nevertheless, I liked this set up; considering that you have to enter the darkness to watch each of the art pieces, I appreciate you can go back to a well lit space in between them.

On one hand we have the multidisciplinary collective Forensic Architecture based at Goldsmith University that includes architects, filmmakers, lawyers and scientists. All combine their skills to investigate allegations of state violence. They don’t consider themselves an art group as such, and like looking at real events. In the work presented they use different patient techniques to uncover what happened on a night of 2017, when Israeli police  attempted to clear a Bedouin village, an action that resulted in two deaths. It was an stressful film for the watcher and for the film makers, who even put their life at risk to make it.

Then, Naeem Mohaiemen separates from real events to present a fictional piece in which a solitary man wanders through the ruins of an abandoned airport, like a character from JG Ballard. He bases this piece on his dad’s experience years ago when he had to spend 9 days at a Greek airport. Using films, installations and essays, his practice make sense of political events in the 70s, while he investigate the legacies of decolonisation among others. A rather surreal film.

Thirdly, we saw Luke Willis Thompson’s piece, who works across film, performance, installations and sculpture to explore cases of institutional violence, race, class and social inequality among others. He presented a controversial film in 35mm of Diamond Reynolds, a lady who used her mobile phone in 2016 to live-stream on Facebook the killing of her partner by police in the US state of Minnesota. We liked this silent piece, and The art blackberry interacted with it as you can see below adding another layer to the piece. The use of a 35mm projector contributed to making this piece more organic and real, and as a consequence, very effective emotionally speaking.

Finally, we saw the work of this year’s winner, Charlotte Prodder, who was not announced as a winner when we saw the art show, but last week. She works with moving image, sculpture and printed image to explore queer identity, landscape, language technology and time, and has recently been chosen to represent Scotland at the Venice Biennale. Her work filmed on an iPhone is poetic and captivating, and I also enjoyed watching it.

The last two works were my favourites. Luke Willis Thompson because of the controversial message he presents with the use of 35mm, a great medium. And Charlotte Prodder because her film made with an iPhone is very personal and poetic and many people will identify with it.


Capturando el estado de ánimo del momento

Turner Prize
26 de septiembre de 2018 – 6 de enero de 2019
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido

Si estás en Londres estas Navidades y te apetece ver una exposición de arte, vale la pena visitar el Turner Prize. Este año, el que es uno de los premios de artes visuales más conocidos del mundo está formado en su totalidad por películas, videos e imágenes en movimiento. Por lo tanto, si deseas ver las cuatro obras de arte presentadas en su totalidad, tendrás que contar con más de 4 horas y media. Pero, nosotras no pasamos tanto tiempo viendo esta exposición. El medio en que se presenta te permite ser flexible con la forma en que lo experimentas, y no tiene que ser tan lineal como cuando vamos al cine.

No me sorprendió encontrar el mismo tipo de trabajo en las cuatro piezas presentadas este año. Captura el estado de ánimo que vivimos actualmente gracias al uso de imágenes en movimiento para un propósito político.

Tal como está expuesto, hay cuatro habitaciones conectadas por un espacio central con sofás y material impreso que recuerda un poco a la sala de espera de un dentista. Sin embargo, me gusta esta presentación; teniendo en cuenta que debes estar en la oscuridad para ver cada una de las piezas de arte, se agradece volver a un espacio bien iluminado entre ellas.

Por un lado, tenemos el colectivo multidisciplinario de Arquitectura Forense con sede en la Universidad de Goldsmith, que incluye arquitectos, cineastas, abogados y científicos. Todos combinan sus conocimiento para investigar denuncias de violencia estatal. No se consideran un grupo de arte como tal, y les gusta explorar eventos reales. En el trabajo presentado, utilizan diferentes técnicas pacientes para descubrir lo que sucedió una noche de 2017, cuando la policía israelí intentó despejar una aldea beduina, una acción que resultó en dos muertes. Es una película estresante tanto para el espectador, como para los cineastas, que incluso ponen su vida en riesgo para hacerla.

En segundo lugar, Naeem Mohaiemen se separa de los eventos reales para presentar una pieza ficticia en la que un hombre solitario recorre las ruinas de un aeropuerto abandonado, como un personaje de JG Ballard. El artista basa esta pieza en la experiencia de su padre hace años cuando tuvo que pasar 9 días en un aeropuerto griego. Utilizando películas, instalaciones y ensayos, su práctica da sentido a los acontecimientos políticos de los años 70, mientras investiga los legados de la descolonización entre otros. Una película bastante surrealista.

En tercer lugar, vimos la pieza de Luke Willis Thompson, que trabaja con cine, performance, instalaciones y esculturas para explorar casos de violencia institucional, raza, clase y desigualdad social, entre otros. Presentó una controvertida película en 35mm de Diamond Reynolds, una mujer que usó su teléfono móvil en 2016 para transmitir en directo en Facebook el asesinato de su compañero por parte de la policía en el estado de Minnesota, EE. UU. Nos gustó esta pieza silenciosa, y The art blackberry interactúa con ella, como se puede ver a continuación, añadiendo otra capa a la pieza. El uso de un proyector de 35 mm contribuye a hacer que esta pieza sea más orgánica y real y, en consecuencia, muy efectiva emocionalmente hablando.

Finalmente, vimos el trabajo de la ganadora de este año, Charlotte Prodder, quien no fue anunciada como ganadora cuando vimos la exhibición de arte, sino la semana pasada. Trabaja con imágenes en movimiento, esculturas e imágenes impresas para explorar la identidad de colectivos homosexuales, el paisaje, la tecnología del lenguaje y el tiempo, y ha sido elegida recientemente para representar a Escocia en la Bienal de Venecia. El trabajo que presenta filmado con un iPhone es bastante poético y cautivador, y también disfrutamos viéndolo.

Los dos últimos trabajos fueron mis favoritos. Luke Willis Thompson por el mensaje de gran controversia que presenta con el uso de película en 35mm, un gran medio. Y Charlotte Prodder porque su película hecha con un iPhone es muy personal y poética y muchas personas se identificarán con ella.

Turner Prize 2018-The art blackberry