Relics of a lost era

Mike Nelson
The asset stripper
18 March – 6 October 2019
Tate Britain, London, UK

The art berries visited Tate Britain recently and came across the installation there is currently at the Duveen Galleries by Mike Nelson. He’s turned this space, originally conceived as the first purpose-built sculpture galleries in England, into an objects strippers’ warehouse using numerous recent industrial relics.

Nelson has chosen to gather objects from post-war Britain that he used to see in his childhood such as big knitting machines and doors from the NHS and display them along the large central corridor at the Tate known as Duveen galleries. Somehow it looks like a monument to a lost era and the vision of society they represent. The art installation has cultural as well as social allusions that go from a local to a national perspective.

The artist has been buying this metal objects at asset-stripping auctions for years. Some machines are the kind of equipment used in textile factories where Nelson’s parents and grandparents worked. However, they now seem to be mysterious objects taken from a distant culture. I thought  initially that they had been taken from a different country, like an old British colony. They make me think of the hard work that is needed to manufacture the clothes we wear; years ago from people who worked in those jobs in western countries and now mostly from people based overseas. Is this a sustainable production model? I do believe that we need to start doing much more up-cycling within the fashion industry. Below you can see a photo of the knitting machine below with me on it.

Then we come across swing doors with porthole windows through which we can enter from an old London hospital, like the living and the dead, which adds to the feeling of a surreal experience. Not only that, some of Nelson’s works speak directly to the museum’s collection. Like the one of those hay rakes that whirl like sunflowers in the early surrealism of Joan Miró. You can see The art blackberry interacting with this art piece. Is she surrendering to sleep and dreaming with those massive sunflower wheels?

Nelson’s sculpture alludes to the industrial functions of metal. He allows his objects to be relics first, sculptures second, and machines again with a mysterious appearance that makes you look at them in a  new light.

Mike Nelson is a contemporary British artist who creates large-scale architectural installations. He has been shortlisted twice for the Turner prize and has represented Britain at the 2011 Venice Biennale.


 

Reliquias de una era perdida

Mike Nelson
The asset stripper
18 de marzo – 6 de octubre de 2019
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido

The art berries visitamos Tate Britain recientemente y nos encontramos con la instalación que hay de Mike Nelson en las Duveen galleries. El artista ha convertido este espacio, originalmente concebido como la primera galería de esculturas especialmente diseñada en Inglaterra, en un almacén de objetos que utiliza numerosas reliquias industriales recientes.

Nelson eligió recoger objetos del período de posguerra en Gran Bretaña que él solía ver en su infancia, como grandes máquinas de tejer y las puertas del NHS y exponerlas a lo largo del pasillo central de la galería conocido como Duveen galleries. De alguna manera, parece un monumento a una era perdida y la visión de la sociedad que representan. La instalación de arte tiene alusiones culturales y sociales que van desde una perspectiva local a otra nacional.

El artista ha estado comprando estos objetos de metal en subastas de desmonte de activos durante años. Algunas máquinas son el tipo de equipo utilizado en las fábricas textiles donde trabajaban sus padres y abuelos. Sin embargo, ahora parecen ser objetos misteriosos tomados de una cultura lejana. Al principio pensé que habían sido tomadas de un país diferente, como una antigua colonia británica. Me hacen pensar en el trabajo duro que se necesita para fabricar la ropa que usamos; años atrás procedente de personas que trabajaban en países occidentales y ahora principalmente de personas que viven en otros países más pobres. ¿Es éste un modelo de producción sostenible? Creo que debemos comenzar a hacer mucho más reciclaje o up-cycling dentro de la industria de la moda. A continuación puedes ver una foto de la máquina de tejer conmigo dentro.

Luego nos encontramos con puertas batientes con ventanillas a través de las cuales podemos entrar en un antiguo hospital de Londres, como los vivos y los muertos, lo que se suma a la sensación de una experiencia surrealista. No sólo eso, algunas de las obras de Nelson hablan directamente de la colección del museo. Como el de esos rastrillos de heno que giran como girasoles en el surrealismo temprano de Joan Miró. Puedes ver a The art blackberry interactuando con esta pieza de arte. ¿Está durmiendo y soñando con esas enormes ruedas de girasol?

La escultura de Nelson alude a las funciones industriales del metal. Él permite que sus objetos sean reliquias primero, esculturas en segundo lugar, y máquinas de nuevo con una apariencia misteriosa que te hace mirarlos desde una nueva perspectiva.

Mike Nelson es un artista británico contemporáneo que crea instalaciones arquitectónicas a gran escala. Ha sido pre-seleccionado dos veces para el premio Turner y ha representado a Gran Bretaña en la Bienal de Venecia 2011.

MN_Theartberries_yellow2MN_Theartberries_b&wMN_Theartberries_yellow1MN_Theartberries_yellow3MN_Theartberries_knittingmachine2MN_Theartberries_knittingmachine1

MN_Theartberries_sunflowers

Exploring space with sculpture

Phyllida Barlow
cul-de-sac
23 February – 23 June 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

After nearly two months without posting anything here, I’m finally back! I have a good excuse for being so quiet since January. My son Samuel was born on the 9th February and I have been really busy and enjoying his company since then.

Nevertheless, there’s a good art show now in London that I wanted to share with you. British sculptor Phyllida Barlow has currently an art exhibition at the contemporary galleries of the Royal Academy of Arts, which will be on until the end of the spring. The art berries went to visit it and I’m sharing it with you here, so you don’t miss one of the best art shows in London this season.

The photos you can see from The art berries below have been taken as usual with an iPhone. We’ve interacted with the artworks and bring you an intimate and personal approach of the art pieces we found more interesting.

As we entered the gallery space, we came across two huge sculptures. One of them is a vertical structure formed by various colourful canvases. A playful and intriguing art piece that traps your attention from the very beginning of the exhibition. From the photos below, you can see The art blackberry next to this piece. She appears to be in conversation with a colourful group of individuals.

As we moved along the art show, a new interesting sculpture is revealed. It reminds me of an amphitheatre with a semicircular seating gallery space sustained by multiple beams that go in different directions. You can see how we blend with the sculpture and contribute to this perception.

Finally, a series of pictures are presented below with The art blackberry amid a forest of inclined beams. In this pictures, her fragility is accentuated by the the menacing beams above her.

In February, Barlow created this exhibition that brings her own interpretation of a residential cul-de-sac. By closing the exit door in the final room, Barlow forced the viewer to turn around and revisit each sculpture anew from the other side. She created forests of seemingly precarious structures and uses them to explore the full height of the gallery space with looming beams, blocks and canvases.

Thresholds, the artist has said, are fascinating places, where you pass through from one space to another. Always seeking the surprise, Barlow expects the work to take her into a  journey, rather than her deciding upon that journey.

Her source of inspiration is in the everyday from a farm to an industrial state. Because of that, Barlow uses everyday materials such as plywood, expanding foam, polystyrene, plaster, cement, plastic piping, Polyfilla, tape, etc. and remind us to look at them in a new context with a new light. They are so common in our world that we’ve stopped even seeing them.

Barlow studied at Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) and the Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). She later taught at both schools and was Professor of Fine Art and Director of Undergraduate Studies at the latter until 2009.


Explorando el espacio con escultura

Phyllida Barlow
Callejón sin salida
23 de febrero – 23 de junio de 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

Después de casi dos meses sin publicar nada aquí, ¡por fin estoy de vuelta! Tengo una buena excusa para estar tan callada desde enero. Mi hijo Samuel nació el 9 de febrero y he estado muy liada y disfrutando de su compañía desde entonces.

De cualquier manera, hay una buena exposición de arte ahora en Londres que quería compartir contigo. La escultora británica Phyllida Barlow tiene desde febrero una exposición en las galerías contemporáneas de la Royal Academy of Arts, que estará abierta hasta el final de la primavera. The art berries fuimos a visitarla y la comparto aquí contigo para que no te pierdas una de las mejores muestras de arte en Londres esta temporada.

Las fotos que puedes ver a continuación en The art berries  se han tomado como siempre con un iPhone. Hemos interactuado con las obras de arte y te brindamos un enfoque intimo y personal de las piezas que encontramos más interesantes.

Cuando entramos en el espacio de la galería, nos encontramos con dos esculturas enormes. Una de ellas es una estructura vertical formada por varios lienzos de colores. Una escultura divertida e intrigante que capta tu atención desde el principio de la exposición. En las fotos que capturamos debajo, puedes ver a The art blackberry junto a esta pieza. Parece estar en conversación con un grupo colorido de individuos.

 

A medida que avanzamos en la muestra de arte, aparece una nueva e interesante escultura. Me recuerda a un anfiteatro con un espacio semicircular en la galería de asientos sostenido por múltiples vigas que van en distintas direcciones. Puedes ver como nos mezclamos con la escultura y contribuimos a esta percepción.

Finalmente, a continuación se puede ver una serie de imágenes con The art blackberry en medio de un bosque de vigas inclinadas. En estas imágenes, su fragilidad se ve acentuada por las vigas que hay sobre ella.

En febrero, Barlow creó esta exposición que trae su propia interpretación de un callejón sin salida residencial. Al cerrar la puerta de salida en la sala final, Barlow obligó al espectador a darse la vuelta y volver a visitar cada escultura desde el otro lado. Creó bosques de estructuras aparentemente precarias y las utiliza para explorar la altura completa del espacio de la galería con vigas, bloques y lienzos que parece que se van a caer de un moment a otro.

Los umbrales, ha dicho la artista, son lugares fascinantes, donde se pasa de un espacio a otro. Siempre buscando la sorpresa, Barlow espera que el trabajo la lleve a un viaje, en lugar de que ella decida sobre ese viaje.

Su fuente de inspiración está en lo cotidiano, desde una granja hasta un estado industrial. Debido a eso, Barlow utiliza materiales cotidianos como madera contrachapada, espuma expandida, poliestireno, yeso, cemento, tuberías de plástico, Polyfilla, cinta, etc. y nos recuerdan mirarlos en un nuevo contexto, con una nueva luz. Son tan comunes en nuestro mundo que hemos dejado de verlos.

Barlow estudió en el Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) y en la Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). Más tarde enseñó en ambas escuelas y fue profesora de Bellas Artes y Directora de Estudios de Pre-grado en esta última hasta el 2009.

PB_The art berries_colour blocks2PB_The art berries_colour blocks1PB-The art berries_amphitheatrePB_The art berries_small sculpturePB_The art berries_black1PB_The art berries_black3PB_The art berries_black4PB_The art berries_black2

Skinning past memories

Heidi Bucher
19 September – 9 December 2018
Parasol Unit gallery, London, UK

The art berries were visiting a couple of weeks ago the Parasol Unit in London, and discovered the work made by Heidi Bucher (1926-1993), a Swiss artist who was interested in exploring architectural space and the body through sculpture. This is apparently the first time her work is displayed in a public gallery 25 years after her death.

I really enjoyed to see the various pieces presented on both floors of this gallery, which may sound very much in tune with what I say about most art exhibitions we visit, but it must be because we choose to see good art exhibitions to bring you the best art on show.

Heidi Bücher was born in Winterthur, Switzerland, and attended the School for the Applied Arts in Zurich. She collaborated in the early 1970’s with her husband and sculptor Carl Bucher. Her early early work was mainly focused on the body and we can see some of these pieces on the screenings of films documenting her work. One of the art pieces showed on the screening is “Bodyshells” that was showcased in an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, now known as the Museum of Art and Design in NYC. This 8mm footage shows various figures covered in big foam costumes and moving slowly across the beach in LA. Their interaction with the surroundings changed completely when dressing like that.

However, the most impressive artworks on shows at this exhibition are the series of Bucher’s large-scale latex “Skinnings”, as she liked to call them. Bucher became more interested in the body’s relationship to space in her later work. In the mid-70s she started experimenting with a new technique, consisting in soaking gauze sheets in latex rubber and using them to cast room interiors, objects, clothing and the human body. We can see on the film projected on the small room downstairs that the peeling-off process from the original surfaces was like a performance on its own because of the physical strength required and the meaning implied.

These works present a haunting imprint of an architectural surface and the peeling-off process seems to represent a liberation from these memories.

TAB_Heidi Bucher blackberryTAB_Heidi Bucher blueberry

In contrast, the works displayed on the first-floor of the gallery are more related to impermanence and fragility. The artist reflected on concepts such as ephemerality, transformation and metamorphosis. We could see latex costume-objects such as the wings of a dragonfly on “Libellenkleid” (1976), next to which we can see The art blackberry on one of our photos below, as well as various examples of beautiful dresses that can potentially transform the wearer into someone else. Likewise the water related artwork on show on the terrace and on the ground-floor seem to be more in consonance with these notions of ephemerality.

TAB_Heidi Bucher dragonfly

It is great to see her artistic process on the videos and the different avenues she used to explore the ideas that concerned her the most. All of them embodied of superb aesthetic power.


Despellejando recuerdos del pasado
Heidi Bucher
19 de septiembre – 9 de diciembre de 2018
Parasol Unit gallery, Londres, Reino Unido

The art berries estuvimos hace un par de semanas visitando la galería Parasol Unit en Londres, donde descubrimos la obra de Heidi Bucher (1926-1993), una artista suiza que estaba interesada en explorar el espacio arquitectónico y el cuerpo a través de la escultura. Aparentemente, esta es la primera vez que su trabajo se exhibe en una galería pública 25 años después de su muerte.

Me encantó ver las diversas piezas presentadas en ambos pisos de esta galería, que pueden sonar muy en sintonía con lo que digo acerca de la mayoría de las exposiciones de arte que visito, pero debe ser porque elegimos ver buenas muestras de arte para brindarte el mejor arte en exposición.

Heidi Bücher nació en Winterthur, Suiza, y asistió a la Escuela de Artes Aplicadas de Zurich. Colaboró ​​a principios de la década de 1970 con su esposo y escultor Carl Bucher. Sus primeros trabajos tempranos se centraron principalmente en el cuerpo y podemos ver algunas de estas piezas en las proyecciones de películas que documentan su trabajo.  Una de las piezas de arte que se muestran en la proyección es “Bodyshells” que se exhibió en una exposición en el Museo de Artesanía Contemporánea, ahora conocido como el Museo de Arte y Diseño en Nueva York. Este video de 8 mm muestra varias figuras cubiertas con grandes disfraces de espuma y avanzando lentamente por la playa en Los Ángeles. Su interacción con el entorno circundante cambiaba por completo al ir así vestidos.

Sin embargo, las obras de arte más impresionantes de esta exhibición son las series de látex a gran escala “Skinnings”, como a Bucher le gustaba llamarlas. Bucher se interesó más en la relación del cuerpo con el espacio en su trabajo posterior. A mediados de los años 70, comenzó a experimentar con una nueva técnica, que consistía en remojar láminas de gasa en látex y usarlas para moldear interiores de interiores, objetos, ropa y el cuerpo humano. Podemos ver en la película que se muestran en una pequeña habitación en la planta baja que el proceso de desprendimiento fue como una performance en sí misma debido a la fuerza física requerida y el significado implícito.

TAB_Heidi Bucher blackberryTAB_Heidi Bucher blueberry

Estas obras se presentan como una huella evocativa de una superficie arquitectónica y el proceso de desprendimiento parece representar una liberación de estos recuerdos.

 

 

En contraste, las obras que se muestran en el primer piso de la galería están más relacionadas con impermanencia y fragilidad. La artista reflexionó sobre conceptos como transformación y metamorfosis. Podríamos ver los disfraces de látex, como las alas de una libélula en “Libellenkleid” (1976), junto al cual podemos ver El arte blackberry en una de nuestras fotos de abajo, así como varios ejemplos de hermosos vestidos que pueden transformar el portador en otra persona. Del mismo modo, las obras de arte relacionadas con el agua que se muestran en la terraza y en la planta baja parecen estar más en consonancia con esas nociones de arte efímero.

TAB_Heidi Bucher dragonfly

Es genial ver su proceso artístico en los videos y las diferentes vías que utilizó para explorar las ideas que más le interesaban. Todos ellas poseedoras de excelente poder estético.

The stories that resonate with us

Joan Jonas
Tate Modern, London, UK
14 March – 5 August

If you’re interested in performance art, you’re in luck, because there’s now an art exhibition at Tate Modern focused on the work of Joan Jonas, a pioneer of performance, video and installation and one of the most important female artists to emerge in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Jonas was born in 1936 in New York City and after finishing her degree in Art History, she went to specialise in sculpture. But, immersed in the New York’s downtown art scene of the 1960s she  began experimenting with performance, video and props after studying with influential choreographer Trisha Brown for two years, and working with choreographers Yvonne Rainer and Steve Paxton in the 1960s.

This art exhibition at Tate Modern showcases Joan Jonas’s great contribution to art over the last five decades, uniting some of her most important pieces. The exhibition is curated by Andrea Lissoni in close collaboration with the artist.

The show is ordered by subject, as we can see how Jonas sometimes revisited topics various times throughout her career. She takes inspiration from different cultures and sources, from fairy tales to myths and local folklore, adapting them to relate to contemporary life.  Using props, mirrors and video screens she creates a complex layering of images that serve her to convey her interest in music, female identity, the environment, as well as natural and urban landscapes.

As we came into the show we could see a range of objects from Jonas’ personal collections, such as masks, wooden animals and items collected on her travels, and the following text in a caption: “one object next to another is like making a visual poem”. It was certainly like entering the individual universe of the artist, something I particularly enjoy.

The second room gave us a selections of the different art performances Jonas had done throughout the years in collaboration with other artists listed here: Benjamin Blackwell, David Crossley, Babette Mangolte, Richard Landry, Gwen Thomas, Gianfranco Gorgoni, Peter Moore, Larry Bell, Roberta Neiman, Beatrice Heyligers and Giorgio Colombo. This room gave us a view of two of her earliest performances such as “Mirror Pieces” (1968-71), in which she alters the audience perception of space using mirror as the central motif, and “Organic Honey Visual Telepaphy” (1972), where Jonas scans her own fragmented image onto a video screen.

The next room of the exhibition was “The Juniper Tree” an installation created in 1994 that evolved from performances staged in 1976 and 1978. I was mesmerised by this installation and intrigued by the story in which it was based. It refers to the Brothers Grimm fairy tale about a little boy who was beheaded by his stepmother and eaten by his father, before being reincarnated as a bird with the help of this stepsister. The juniper tree is where the boy’s mother had been buried and where he was buried by his stepmother before a beautiful bird flied out from it. The bird kills his stepmother by dropping a stone on her head and turned back into a boy to live happily ever after with his father and stepsister. Joan Jonas performed with this installation in various places, alone and collaboratively, and the version conserved here is the last one from 1978.

The art raspberry used her own intuition to perform next to “The Juniper Tree”, adding a new interpretation to the artwork. She saw herself as the tree that was present and muted throughout the story, and somehow an ally to the boy.

Jonas’ passion of story-telling was evident also in “Lines in the Sand” (2002), an installation and performance created for Documenta 11, in which Jonas reworks the myth of Helen of Troy to explore contemporary political events. And by the end of exhibition, we could see “Double Lunar Rabbits” (2010) in which she draws inspiration from the story of a rabbit on the moon, both a Japanese myth and Aztec fable.

However, some of my favourite pieces in this show were contained in a room with multiples references to birds. We could see them projected on screens, hanging from the ceiling, painted on canvas. I remembered how I used to dream that I could fly when I was little and I felt tempted to become one of them once again.

Finally, we saw some of her latest pieces in a different room downstair, with not much lighting and a really strong ritualistic feeling. There Jonas touches issues of climate change and animal extinction, subjects that are central to the artist’s current practice.


Las historias que resuenan con nosotros

Joan Jonas
Tate Modern, Londres, Reino Unido
Del 14 de marzo al 5 de agosto

Si te interesa el arte del ‘performance’, estás de suerte, porque ahora hay una exposición de arte en Tate Modern (Londres) centrada en el trabajo de Joan Jonas, pionera del arte del ‘performance’, video e instalación y una de las artistas femeninas más importantes que surgieron a finales de la década de 1960 y principios de la de 1970.

Jonas nació en 1936 en la ciudad de Nueva York y después de terminar sus estudios en Historia del Arte, se especializó en escultura. Pero, inmersa en la escena artística del centro de la ciudad de Nueva York de la década de 1960, comenzó a experimentar con performance, video y accesorios después de estudiar con la influyente coreógrafa Trisha Brown durante dos años y trabajar con los coreógrafos Yvonne Rainer y Steve Paxton en la década de 1960.

Esta exposición en Tate Modern muestra la gran contribución de Joan Jonas al arte en las últimas cinco décadas, uniendo algunas de sus piezas más importantes. La exposición está comisariada por Andrea Lissoni en estrecha colaboración con la artista.

La muestra está ordenada por temas, ya que Jonas vuelve a tocar los mismos temas varias veces a lo largo de su carrera. Se inspira en diferentes culturas y fuentes, pasando por cuentos de hadas, mitos y folclore local, y adaptándolos para relacionarlos con la vida contemporánea. Utilizando accesorios, espejos y pantallas de video crea una compleja colección de imágenes que le sirven para transmitir su interés en la música, la identidad femenina, el medio ambiente, así como en paisajes naturales y urbanos.

Cuando entramos a la exposición pudimos ver una variedad de objetos de la colección personal de Jonas, como máscaras, animales de madera y objetos recogidos en sus viajes junto con el siguiente mensaje escrito en una leyenda: “un objeto al lado del otro es como hacer un poema visual “. Ciertamente fue como entrar en el universo individual del artista, algo que disfruto particularmente.

 

La segunda sala ofrece una selección de las diferentes representaciones artísticas que Jonas hizo a lo largo de los años en colaboración con otros artistas incluidos aquí: Benjamin Blackwell, David Crossley, Babette Mangolte, Richard Landry, Gwen Thomas, Gianfranco Gorgoni, Peter Moore, Larry Bell, Roberta Neiman, Beatrice Heyligers y Giorgio Colombo. Esta sala presenta dos de sus primeras actuaciones como: “Mirror Pieces” (1968-71), en la que altera la percepción del espacio en el público utilizando el espejo como motivo central, y “Organic Honey Visual Telepaphy” (1972) , donde Jonas proyecta su propia imagen fragmentada en una pantalla de video.

La siguiente sala de la exposición es “The Juniper Tree”, una instalación creada en 1994 que evolucionó a partir de las ‘performances’ realizadas en 1976 y 1978. Me cautivó esta instalación y me intrigó la historia en la que se basaba. Se refiere al cuento de hadas de los hermanos Grimm sobre un niño que fue decapitado por su madrastra y comido por su padre, antes de reencarnarse en un pájaro con la ayuda de su hermanastra. El árbol de enebro es donde la madre del niño había sido enterrada y donde el niño fué enterrado por su madrastra antes de que un hermoso pájaro volara desde allí. El pájaro mata a su madrastra arrojándole una piedra en la cabeza y se vuelve a convertir en un niño que vive feliz para siempre con su padre y su hermanastra. Joan Jonas actuó con esta instalación en varios lugares, sóla y en colaboración, y la versión que se presenta aquí es la última de 1978.

‘The art raspberry’ usó su propia intuición con esta obra de “The Juniper Tree” para el ‘performance’ y añadió una nueva interpretación a la obra de arte. Ella es el árbol de enebro que esta presente y en silencio a lo largo de la historia, y es de alguna manera un aliado del niño.

La pasión de Jonas por contar historias también se hizo evidente en “Lines in the Sand” (2002), una instalación y performance creada para Documenta 11, en la que Jonas recrea el mito de Helena de Troya para explorar eventos políticos contemporáneos. Y al final de la exposición, pudimos ver “Double Lunar Rabbits” (2010) en el que se inspira en la historia de un conejo en la luna, un mito japonés y una fábula azteca.

Sin embargo, algunas de mis piezas favoritas en esta muestra de arte están en una sala con múltiples referencias a pájaros. Se pueden ver proyectados en pantallas, colgando del techo, pintados sobre lienzo. Recordé cómo solía soñar que podía volar cuando era niña y me sentí tentada a volver a ser uno de ellos.

Finalmente, vimos algunas de sus últimas piezas en una habitación inferior, sin demasiada iluminación y con un fuerte sentimiento ritual. Allí Jonas toca los problemas del cambio climático y la extinción de los animales, temas que son fundamentales para la práctica actual de la artista.

Joan Jonas-Juniper Tree1

Joan Jonas-Juniper Tree3

Joan Jonas-climbing

Joan Jonas-Birds1

Joan Jonas-Bird2