Skinning past memories

Heidi Bucher
19 September – 9 December 2018
Parasol Unit gallery, London, UK

The art berries were visiting a couple of weeks ago the Parasol Unit in London, and discovered the work made by Heidi Bucher (1926-1993), a Swiss artist who was interested in exploring architectural space and the body through sculpture. This is apparently the first time her work is displayed in a public gallery 25 years after her death.

I really enjoyed to see the various pieces presented on both floors of this gallery, which may sound very much in tune with what I say about most art exhibitions we visit, but it must be because we choose to see good art exhibitions to bring you the best art on show.

Heidi Bücher was born in Winterthur, Switzerland, and attended the School for the Applied Arts in Zurich. She collaborated in the early 1970’s with her husband and sculptor Carl Bucher. Her early early work was mainly focused on the body and we can see some of these pieces on the screenings of films documenting her work. One of the art pieces showed on the screening is “Bodyshells” that was showcased in an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, now known as the Museum of Art and Design in NYC. This 8mm footage shows various figures covered in big foam costumes and moving slowly across the beach in LA. Their interaction with the surroundings changed completely when dressing like that.

However, the most impressive artworks on shows at this exhibition are the series of Bucher’s large-scale latex “Skinnings”, as she liked to call them. Bucher became more interested in the body’s relationship to space in her later work. In the mid-70s she started experimenting with a new technique, consisting in soaking gauze sheets in latex rubber and using them to cast room interiors, objects, clothing and the human body. We can see on the film projected on the small room downstairs that the peeling-off process from the original surfaces was like a performance on its own because of the physical strength required and the meaning implied.

These works present a haunting imprint of an architectural surface and the peeling-off process seems to represent a liberation from these memories.

TAB_Heidi Bucher blackberryTAB_Heidi Bucher blueberry

In contrast, the works displayed on the first-floor of the gallery are more related to impermanence and fragility. The artist reflected on concepts such as ephemerality, transformation and metamorphosis. We could see latex costume-objects such as the wings of a dragonfly on “Libellenkleid” (1976), next to which we can see The art blackberry on one of our photos below, as well as various examples of beautiful dresses that can potentially transform the wearer into someone else. Likewise the water related artwork on show on the terrace and on the ground-floor seem to be more in consonance with these notions of ephemerality.

TAB_Heidi Bucher dragonfly

It is great to see her artistic process on the videos and the different avenues she used to explore the ideas that concerned her the most. All of them embodied of superb aesthetic power.


Despellejando recuerdos del pasado
Heidi Bucher
19 de septiembre – 9 de diciembre de 2018
Parasol Unit gallery, Londres, Reino Unido

The art berries estuvimos hace un par de semanas visitando la galería Parasol Unit en Londres, donde descubrimos la obra de Heidi Bucher (1926-1993), una artista suiza que estaba interesada en explorar el espacio arquitectónico y el cuerpo a través de la escultura. Aparentemente, esta es la primera vez que su trabajo se exhibe en una galería pública 25 años después de su muerte.

Me encantó ver las diversas piezas presentadas en ambos pisos de esta galería, que pueden sonar muy en sintonía con lo que digo acerca de la mayoría de las exposiciones de arte que visito, pero debe ser porque elegimos ver buenas muestras de arte para brindarte el mejor arte en exposición.

Heidi Bücher nació en Winterthur, Suiza, y asistió a la Escuela de Artes Aplicadas de Zurich. Colaboró ​​a principios de la década de 1970 con su esposo y escultor Carl Bucher. Sus primeros trabajos tempranos se centraron principalmente en el cuerpo y podemos ver algunas de estas piezas en las proyecciones de películas que documentan su trabajo.  Una de las piezas de arte que se muestran en la proyección es “Bodyshells” que se exhibió en una exposición en el Museo de Artesanía Contemporánea, ahora conocido como el Museo de Arte y Diseño en Nueva York. Este video de 8 mm muestra varias figuras cubiertas con grandes disfraces de espuma y avanzando lentamente por la playa en Los Ángeles. Su interacción con el entorno circundante cambiaba por completo al ir así vestidos.

Sin embargo, las obras de arte más impresionantes de esta exhibición son las series de látex a gran escala “Skinnings”, como a Bucher le gustaba llamarlas. Bucher se interesó más en la relación del cuerpo con el espacio en su trabajo posterior. A mediados de los años 70, comenzó a experimentar con una nueva técnica, que consistía en remojar láminas de gasa en látex y usarlas para moldear interiores de interiores, objetos, ropa y el cuerpo humano. Podemos ver en la película que se muestran en una pequeña habitación en la planta baja que el proceso de desprendimiento fue como una performance en sí misma debido a la fuerza física requerida y el significado implícito.

TAB_Heidi Bucher blackberryTAB_Heidi Bucher blueberry

Estas obras se presentan como una huella evocativa de una superficie arquitectónica y el proceso de desprendimiento parece representar una liberación de estos recuerdos.

 

 

En contraste, las obras que se muestran en el primer piso de la galería están más relacionadas con impermanencia y fragilidad. La artista reflexionó sobre conceptos como transformación y metamorfosis. Podríamos ver los disfraces de látex, como las alas de una libélula en “Libellenkleid” (1976), junto al cual podemos ver El arte blackberry en una de nuestras fotos de abajo, así como varios ejemplos de hermosos vestidos que pueden transformar el portador en otra persona. Del mismo modo, las obras de arte relacionadas con el agua que se muestran en la terraza y en la planta baja parecen estar más en consonancia con esas nociones de arte efímero.

TAB_Heidi Bucher dragonfly

Es genial ver su proceso artístico en los videos y las diferentes vías que utilizó para explorar las ideas que más le interesaban. Todos ellas poseedoras de excelente poder estético.

Sculptures at the royal park

Frieze Sculpture 2018
July – 7 October
Regent’s Park, London, UK

If you live in London or you happen to pass by before the 7th October, don’t miss the “Frieze Sculpture 2018” art show there’s at the moment in Regent’s Park. You’ll see a great selection of large scale sculptures made by artists from around the world.

Regent’s Park, an English garden with a strong French influence, is for second time hosting this year’s Frieze sculpture; the perfect scenery for these sculptures. Featuring the artworks from 25 artists from five continents and presented by leading galleries the show has been on for about three months, and you still have it on for a few more days.

The art berries were there and would like to bring you a new and personal interpretation of the artworks with our photos. This is the selection I’ve done of it and I hope you enjoy it.

One of our favourites was the sculpture “No. 814” (2018) from Rana Begum (b.1977, Bangladesh). The artist created a colourful stained-glass structure that reflects the changing light and colour and creates an ever changing experience in interaction with it. And very much in line with this sculpture is the work presented by  Dan Graham (b. 1942, USA) called London Rococo (2012) that consists of a glass pavilion that becomes activated by visitors when entering it, as we The art berries did.

TheArtBerries-Rana Begum1TheArtBerries-Rana Begum2

TheArtBerries-Dan Graham1

We could also see a big penguin from John Baldessari (b.1931, USA) who plays with our preconceptions and represents himself as a penguin, six feet and seven inches tall. Also Tim Etchells’s (b. 1962, UK) new text-based work, “Everything is Lost”, where a loose constellation is presented against the landscape, and the phrase enacts the content of the work, where the letter are considered already lost.

I was also intrigued by Laura Ford’s (b. 1961, UK) sculpture named “Dancing Clog Girls I-III” (2015) made in bronze. It reminded me of an old fairy-tales at first sight, but with a bit of a sinister feeling, as I see some sort of roots growing from their clogs into the earth that would stop them from running away.

TheArtBerries-Laura Ford 1

And then among many others, we liked the sculpture from Kimsooja (b.1957, South Korea) called “A needle woman: Galaxy was a Memory, Earth is a Souvenir” (2014). The 14-metre-high needle woman structure uses a needle as an intersection between distance and memory threading across a cosmic scale.

TheArtBerries-Kimsooja1

The artworks this year were selected and placed by Clare Lilley, Director of Programme, Yorkshire Sculpture Park. The full list of artists presenting sculptures this year include: Larry Achiampong, John Baldessari, Rana Begum, Yoan Capote, James Capper, Elmgreen & Dragset, Tracey Emin, Tim Etchells, Rachel Feinstein, Barry Flanagan, Laura Ford, Dan Graham, Haroon Gunn-Salie, Bharti Kher, Kimsooja, Michele Mathison, Virginia Overton, Simon Periton, Kathleen Ryan, Sean Scully, Conrad Shawcross, Monika Sosnowska, Kiki Smith, Hugo Wilson and Richard Woods.

Long live the arts in touch with nature!


Esculturas en el parque real
Escultura Frieze 2018
Julio – 7 octubre
Regent’s Park, Londres, Reino Unido

Si vives en Londres o pasas antes del 7 de octubre, no te pierdas la muestra de arte “Frieze Sculpture 2018” que hay ahora en Regent’s Park. Podrás ver una gran selección de esculturas a gran escala hechas por artistas de todo el mundo.

Regent’s Park es uno de los jardines reales de gran influencia francesa que por segunda vez alberga la escultura Frieze de este año; el escenario perfecto para estas esculturas. Con las obras de arte de 25 artistas de los cinco continentes y presentado por las principales galerías, la exposición lleva abierta durante aproximadamente tres meses y es gratis. Todavía estás a tiempo si no la has visto porque aún le quedan unos días más antes de que lo quiten.

The art berries estuvieron allí y me gustaría traerte una interpretación nueva y personal de las obras de arte con nuestra intervención. Esta es la selección que he hecho de ella y espero que la disfrutes.

Uno de nuestras favoritos fue la escultura “No. 814 ”(2018) de Rana Begum (b.1977, Bangladesh). La artista creó una colorida estructura de vidrio que refleja los cambios de luz y color y crea una experiencia siempre cambiante en la interacción con ella. Y muy en línea con esta escultura, está el trabajo presentado por Dan Graham (nacido en 1942, EE. UU.) llamado London Rococo (2012) que consiste en un pabellón de vidrio que se activa cuando los visitantes entran en el e interactuar, como hicimos nosotras, The art berries.

TheArtBerries-Rana Begum1TheArtBerries-Rana Begum2

TheArtBerries-Dan Graham1

También pudimos ver un gran pingüino de John Baldessari (b.1931, EE. UU.) Que juega con ideas preconcebidas y presentándose a sí mismo como un pingüino, de seis pies y siete pulgadas de alto. También el nuevo trabajo de Tim Etchells (n. 1962, Reino Unido), “Everything is Lost”, donde se presenta una constelación suelta de letras contra el paisaje, y la frase representa el contenido de la obra, donde la carta ya se considera perdida.

Entre otras, me intrigó ver la escultura de Laura Ford (n. 1961, Reino Unido) llamada “Dancing Clog Girls I-III” (2015) hecha en bronce. Me recordó a un viejo cuento de hadas a primera vista, pero me dejo una impresión un poco siniestra al ver una especie de raíces que crecen desde sus zuecos hasta la tierra y les impide moverse libremente.

TheArtBerries-Laura Ford 1

Y luego, entre muchos otros, nos gustó la escultura de Kimsooja (b.1957, Corea del Sur) llamada “Una aguja woman: La galaxia era una memoria, la Tierra es un recuerdo” (2014). La estructura de agujas de 14 metros de altura utiliza una aguja como una intersección entre la distancia y la memoria cosiendo a escala cósmica.

TheArtBerries-Kimsooja1

Las obras de arte de este año fueron seleccionadas y colocadas por Clare Lilley, Directora de Programas, Yorkshire Sculpture Park. La lista completa de artistas que presentan esculturas este año incluye: Larry Achiampong, John Baldessari, Rana Begum, Yoan Capote, James Capper, Elmgreen & Dragset, Tracey Emin, Tim Etchells, Rachel Feinstein, Barry Flanagan, Laura Ford, Dan Graham, Haroon Gunn -Salie, Bharti Kher, Kimsooja, Michele Mathison, Virginia Overton, Simon Periton, Kathleen Ryan, Sean Scully, Conrad Shawcross, Monika Sosnowska, Kiki Smith, Hugo Wilson y Richard Woods.

¡Viva el arte en contacto con la naturaleza!

For more information on the Frieze Sculpture 2018 art exhibition check this link.

Binding to change perceptions

Seung-taek Lee
White Cube – Mason’s Yard, London, UK.
25 May 2018 – 30 June 2018

The art raspberry and I visited the White Cube at Mason’s Yard in London last week and discovered the work of Seung-taek Lee, a Korean interdisciplinary artist who’s best known for conceptualising in the notion of “anti-concept” or “anti-art”. Trained as a sculptor, he has worked as a performance artist and is one of the first generation pioneers of experimental art in South Korea.

Since the beginning of his career as an artist in the late 1950s, Lee worked independently from the dominant art scene in South Korea, while most artists and art critics followed western art trends as the only way to survive. He claimed these artists were unaware of their own identity and started experimenting in order to understand the true nature of Korean modern art. Having said that, his artworks from the 1960s and 1970s have been associated to art movements such as Land Art, Arte Povera and Post-Minimalism.

This art show at the White Cube Mason’s Yard gallery in London is Lee’s first solo art exhibition in the UK that comprises artworks from the 1960s until today and reveals his interest in materiality and cultural identity.

One of the main characteristics of his art practice involves the binding of found objects, natural or existing architectural structures, as a means of suggesting the transformability of their inherent material properties. This feature can be appreciated on works that seem completely different from each other. In fact, the art exhibition spreads between two floors, and at first sight the artworks at ground level seemed to come from a different artist to the ones placed at basement level.

At ground level, all artworks look organic and close to nature. Various sculptures are made of granite, a material used widely in Korea for outdoor monuments for its durability. Lee’s artworks look  soft and even sensual. Some of them are placed at floor level, without a plinth, so they seem more accessible. With  two other works, he ties small pieces of granite with rope or wire to confuse the viewer’s perception.

As Lee has declared at some point, the work’s visual impact comes from the “tension between the wooden bar, precariously hung from two thin cords, and the clusters of bifurcated stones that effectively conjure a sense of gravitational pressure”.

The art berries’ photo of one of these works with The art raspberry immediately below the stones accentuate this feeling of threat from the stones and vulnerability of the model.

At this level, we could also see framed works made of ropes on canvas referred to as ‘canvas drawings’. The artist used the ropes as an alternative to the usual lines drawn on paper, and the knots and loose ends of these works acquire a more tactile nature.

Lastly, at basement level, we could see the recreated monumental vinyl structures from the 1960s with striking bright colours. Originally, they were first made of sheets of cheap, factory produced vinyl and has been recreated for this exhibition using urethane vinyl of greater durability but similar look. They clearly contrast with the neutral and organic colours of the ground floor gallery. However, the enveloping and the bound or tied subject remains central to Lee’s art practice here as well. I enjoyed performing with the big vinyl structures. The quietness of this floor surrounded by dim lighting invited to mindfulness.

The ‘binding’ of objects is an artistic strategy and symbolic gesture of subversion used by Lee that not only destabilise the viewer’s perception but it also questions the existing form, the intended function and meaning of the bound object.


Esta es la primera entrada que hago en español. Espero que esto sirva para acercar la escena artística en Londres al mundo hispano parlante.

Amarrar para cambiar percepciones

Seung-taek Lee
White Cube – Mason’s Yard, Londres, Reino Unido.
25 May 2018 – 30 June 2018

The art raspberry y yo visitamos la galeria White Cube en Mason’s Yard en Londres la semana pasada y descubrimos el trabajo de Seung-taek Lee, un artista interdisciplinario coreano que es más conocido por conceptualizar en la noción de “anti-concepto” o “anti-arte”. Formado como escultor, Lee ha trabajado como performance artist y es pionero del arte experimental en Corea del Sur.

Desde el principio de su trayectoria artística a finales de los cincuenta, Lee trabajó independientemente de la escena artística dominante en Corea del Sur, mientras que la mayoría de los artistas y críticos de arte de entonces seguían las tendencias de arte occidental como la única forma de sobrevivir en este campo. Lee pensaba que estos artistas desconocían su propia identidad y comenzó a experimentar para comprender la verdadera naturaleza del arte moderno coreano. Dicho esto, sus obras de arte de los años sesenta y setenta se han asociado a movimientos artísticos como Land Art, Arte Povera y Post Minimalismo.

Esta exposición de arte en la galería White Cube Mason’s Yard en London es la primera muestra en solitario de Lee en el Reino Unido que comprende obras de arte desde la década de 1960 hasta la actualidad y revela su interés en la materialidad y la identidad cultural.

Una de las principales características de su práctica artística consiste en atar objetos encontrados, naturales o estructuras arquitectónicas existentes, como forma de sugerir la capacidad de transformación de sus propiedades materiales inherentes. Esta característica se puede apreciar en trabajos que parecen completamente diferentes entre sí. De hecho, la exposición de arte se extiende entre dos pisos, y a primera vista las obras de arte de la planta baja parecen provenir de un artista distinto a las que hay en la galería del sótano.

En la planta baja, todas las obras de arte parecen orgánicas y más cercanas a la naturaleza. Varias esculturas están hechas de granito, un material ampliamente utilizado en Corea para monumentos al aire libre por su durabilidad. Las obras de arte de Lee se muestran suaves e incluso sensuales. Algunas de ellas son colocadas  en el suelo, sin pedestal, haciéndolas parecer mas accesibles. Con otras dos obras, ata pequeños trozos de granito con cuerda o alambre para distorsionar la percepción del espectador.

Como Lee ha declarado en algún momento, el impacto visual de la obra proviene de la “tensión entre la barra de madera, precariamente colgada de dos cuerdas delgadas, y los cúmulos de piedras bifurcadas que efectivamente evocan una sensación de presión gravitacional”.

La foto que incluye a The art raspberry inmediatamente debajo de las piedras acentúa esta sensación de amenaza de las piedras y la vulnerabilidad de la modelo.

En este nivel, también pudimos ver obras enmarcadas hechas de cuerdas sobre lienzo denominadas ‘dibujos en lienzo’. El artista utilizó las cuerdas como alternativa a las líneas habituales dibujadas sobre papel, y los nudos y cabos sueltos de estas obras adquieren una naturaleza más táctil.

Por último, a nivel del sótano, pudimos ver las estructuras de vinilo monumentales recreadas de la década de 1960 con llamativos colores brillantes. Originalmente se hicieron de láminas de vinilo de fabricación barata y se han recreado para esta exposición utilizando vinilo de uretano de mayor durabilidad pero de apariencia similar. Contrastan claramente con los colores neutros y orgánicos de la galería de la planta baja. Sin embargo, la característica fundamental en la obra de Lee en esta exposition sigue siendo la practica de atar o envolver distintos elementos. Me gusto hacer este performance con las grandes estructuras de vinilo. La iluminación y tranquilidad de esta planta invitaba a la meditación.

La practica de atar objetos es una estrategia artística y un gesto simbólico de subversión utilizado por Lee que no solo desestabiliza la percepción del espectador sino que además cuestiona la forma existente, la función y el significado del objeto atado.

Seung-taek Lee-stones

Seun taek lee-orange1

Seung-taek Lee-vinyl yellow