An expert in the art of repetition

Andy Warhol
12 March – 15 November (Extended)
Tate Modern, London, UK

This post is long overdue. But, Covid-19 has transformed our lives in unimaginable ways. Galleries have been closed for a few months and finally they can be visited only by appointment here in London. So, I’m back here to tell you about the last exhibition I’ve seen in months: Andy Warhol at Tate Modern. The show has been extended until the 15th November, so you’re still in time to see it.

I’m not the biggest fan of pop art, but Warhol is an American icon that cannot be missed. The art show features some of his iconic paintings, the work that made him famous as a pop artist (a term he hated apparently) including Coca-Cola bottles, 50 Marilyn Monroe portraits (1962), 168 pairs of Marilyn’s lips (see a picture of The art berries featuring this artwork below), Elvis I and II 1963/1964, Pink Race Riot 1964, a woman falling from a building 35 times, 10 Brillo boxes in a corner, 100 Campbell soup cans, 112 bottles of Coke and Marlon Brando twice, etc. Warhol was an expert in the art of repetition. “I want to be a machine” he said. Hence, his obsession with repetition, which in my opinion enhances the artwork instead of making it dull.

Warhol’s sexuality seems to be an important theme in this exhibition. Beginning with a selection of his early line drawings of men from the 1950s, counting on the film Sleep 1963, which documents Warhol’s lover, the poet John Giorno – and featuring large-scale paintings like his 1975 Ladies and Gentlemen series, not shown in the UK before. They depict anonymous Black and Latinx drag queens and trans women from New York, including iconic performer and activist, Marsha P. Johnson, a prominent figure in the Stonewall uprising of 1969 – a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the LGBT community in response to a police raid. The exhibition looks at how Warhol’s attempt to bring the stars of the underground into the mainstream.

However, one of my favourite works in this exhibition was right at the end of the art show: Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper. Silkscreened from a reproduction, it’s repeated 60 times across a panoramic canvas in black and white (see image below). It turns Leonardo’s masterpiece in a static film-strip by the use of repetition. And it’s some kind of homage to Luis Buñuel’s film, Viridiana.

The art show tell us about his experiences as a child of working-class immigrants, a gay man, a devout Catholic and the target of a bizarre shooting by one of his groupies, to help us understand the evolution of his art. His innovative and unique approach to art in an age of immense political, social and technological change has been recognised by the art world ever since.


Experto en el arte de la repetición
Andy Warhol
12 de marzo – 15 de noviembre (ampliada)
Tate Modern, Londres, Reino Unido

Hace tiempo que quería poner un post. Pero, Covid-19 ha transformado nuestras vidas de formas inimaginables. Las galerías han estado cerradas durante unos meses y ya se pueden visitar con cita previa aquí en Londres. Así que, estoy de vuelta para contaros sobre la última exposición que he visto en meses: Andy Warhol en Tate Modern. La exposición ha sido extendida hasta el 15 de noviembre, por lo que aún estás a tiempo de verla.

No soy la mayor fan del pop art, pero Warhol es un ícono estadounidense que no te puedes perder. La muestra de arte presenta algunas de sus pinturas más icónicas, el trabajo que le hizo famoso como artista pop (un término que aparentemente odiaba) incluyendo botellas de Coca-Cola, 50 retratos de Marilyn Monroe (1962), 168 pares de labios de Marilyn (ver una imagen de The art berries con esta obra de arte a continuación), Elvis I y II 1963/1964, Pink Race Riot 1964, una mujer que se cae de un edificio 35 veces, 10 cajas de Brillo en una esquina, 100 latas de sopa Campbell, 112 botellas de Coca-Cola y Marlon Brando dos veces, etc. Warhol era un experto en el arte de la repetición. “Quiero ser una máquina”, dijo. De ahí su obsesión por la repetición, realzando la obra de arte en lugar de volverla aburrida.

La sexualidad de Warhol parece ser un tema importante en esta exposición. Comenzando con una selección de sus primeros dibujos lineales de hombres de la década de 1950, contando con la película Sleep 1963 – que documenta al amante de Warhol, el poeta John Giorno – y presentando pinturas de gran formato como su serie Ladies and Gentlemen de 1975, no mostrada en el Reino Unido antes. Representan drag queens y mujeres trans negras y latinas anónimas de Nueva York, incluida la artista y activista icónica, Marsha P. Johnson, una figura prominente en el levantamiento de Stonewall de 1969 – una serie de manifestaciones espontáneas y violentas de miembros de la LGBT comunidad en respuesta a una redada policial. La exposición analiza el interés de Warhol por llevar a las estrellas del underground a la corriente principal.

Sin embargo, una de mis obras favoritas de esta exposición estaba justo al final de la muestra de arte: La Última Cena de Leonardo da Vinci. Serigrafiada a partir de una reproducción, se repite 60 veces en un lienzo panorámico en blanco y negro. Convierte la obra maestra de Leonardo en una tira de película estática mediante el uso de la repetición. Es una especie de homenaje a la película de Luis Buñuel, Viridiana.

La exposición nos cuenta sus experiencias como hijo de inmigrantes de clase trabajadora, hombre gay, católico devoto y blanco de un extraño tiroteo por parte de una de sus groupies, para ayudarnos a comprender la evolución de su arte. Su enfoque innovador y único del arte en una época de inmenso cambio político, social y tecnológico ha sido reconocido por el mundo del arte desde entonces.

Retelling stories through found objects

Rayyane Tabet
Encounters
24 September – 14 December 2019
Parasol Unit foundation for contemporary art, London, UK
Free entry

The current art show at Parasol Unit that finishes this week is by Beirut-born and based artist Rayyane Tabet, who presents here 8 works from the past 13 years, installed together for the first time. I didn’t know this artist previously, but I was pleasantly surprised by his work. The minimalist quality of his artworks comes along with historial and cultural references to his birthplace of Lebanon that he combines sometimes with personal stories.

The artist appears to be interested in communicating an alternative view of the main political and economic events that have taken place in his country in recent years. Not only that, with his artwork he wants to contribute to the outside world’s understanding of this complex place.

All of the above, helps the visitor to connect better with his work. Tabet takes inspiration from overlooked objects that he wraps with personal anecdotes and supranational histories. According to Tabet, how Lebanon is perceived by the outside world and even by Lebaneses has no common version in history textbooks. Children in different communities are taught different versions of history.

“I’m interested in the question of whether we could create a history told by objects and materials. A lot of the time those last longer than people and are able to overcome moments of violence and marginalisation in a way that people cannot.” the artist says. 

On the ground floor, at the back of the gallery The art berries found a big red star hanging from the ceiling together with a red horse among other objects. We liked the star for some art interaction. See some photos below.

Another artwork very relevant in the show is a couple of oars of a rowing boat. The artist’s father was going to use that boat to escape their home country for Cyprus. The operation was aborted and long after that attempt of fleeting the family re-encounter the same boat by accident. The artist purchased it and decided to use as one of his artworks.

And finally, our favourite artwork on this exhibition was “Steel Rings” (2013–), a sequence of 28 rolled-steel rings arranged in a line. We liked this work for its minimalist simplicity and because it was a good art piece to interact with. Not particularly novel at first sight. But, when you pay a closer look at it and read about why the artist has chosen to display this work, you’ll be much more intrigued. Each of these rings is engraved with a distance and location in longitude and latitude, marking a specific place along the now defund Trans-Arabian Pipeline (TAPline). Built in 1947 by an alliance of US oil companies, and once the world’s largest long-distance oil pipeline, is still the only physical structure that crosses the borders of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Syria, the Golan, and Lebanon. When the American TAPline company finally closed down after decades of regional conflict, they abandoned the pipeline in situ.

The rings can be seen as a witness to that period of history. Tapline did not survive the first Gulf War (1990–91), at the onset of which it was abandoned as a result of Saudi Arabia’s opposition to Jordan’s support of Iraq. Although largely untold, this story remains part of popular consciousness and memory, and I believe that Tabet brings up the subject elegantly and skillfully inside the gallery.


 

Volver a contar historias a través de objetos encontrados

Rayyane Tabet
Encuentros
24 de septiembre – 14 de diciembre de 2019
Parasol Unit, Londres, Reino Unido.
Entrada libre

La exposición de arte que hay ahora en Parasol Unit y que termina esta semana es de Rayyane Tabet, un artista nacido y ubicado en Beirut que presenta aquí 8 obras de los últimos 13 años, instaladas juntas por primera vez. No conocía a este artista anteriormente, pero su trabajo me sorprendió gratamente. La calidad minimalista de sus obras de arte se acompaña de referencias históricas y culturales a su lugar de nacimiento del Líbano que a veces combina con historias personales.

El artista parece estar interesado en comunicar una visión alternativa de los principales acontecimientos políticos y económicos que han tenido lugar en su país en los últimos años. No solo eso, con sus obras de arte quiere contribuir a la comprensión externa de este complejo lugar. 

Todo lo anterior, ayuda al visitante a conectar mejor con su trabajo. Tabet se inspira en objetos pasados ​​por alto, que envuelve en anécdotas personales e historias supranacionales. Según Tabet, cómo el Líbano es percibido por el mundo exterior e incluso por los libaneses no tiene una versión común en los libros de texto de historia. A los niños de diferentes comunidades se les enseñan diferentes versiones de la historia.

“Me interesa la cuestión de si podríamos crear una historia contada por objetos y materiales. Muchas veces duran más que las personas y son capaces de superar los momentos de violencia y marginación de una manera que la gente no puede “, dice el artista. 

En la parte posterior de la planta baja de la galería, The art berries encontramos una gran estrella roja colgando del techo junto con un caballo rojo entre otros objetos. Nos gustó la estrella para interactuar y tomar alguna foto. Podrás ver algunas fotos a continuación.

Otra obra de arte muy relevante en la exposición es un par de remos de un bote. El padre del artista iba a usar ese bote para escapar de su país de origen hacia Chipre. La operación fue abortada y mucho después de ese intento de huir de la familia se reencontró con el mismo bote  por accidente. El artista lo compró y decidió usarlo como una de sus obras de arte.

Y finalmente, nuestra obra de arte favorita en esta exposición fue Steel Rings (2013–), una secuencia de 28 anillos de acero laminado dispuestos en una línea. Nos gusto esta obra estéticamente por su simplicidad minimalista y como pieza de arte con la cual interactuar. No es particularmente novedosa a primera vista. Sin embargo, cuando echas un vistazo más de cerca y lees sobre por qué el artista ha elegido mostrar este trabajo, estarás mucho más intrigado. Cada uno de estos anillos está grabado con una distancia y ubicación en longitud y latitud, marcando un lugar específico a lo largo de la tubería Trans-Arabian (TAPline). Construido en 1947 por una alianza de compañías petroleras estadounidenses, y que una vez fue el oleoducto de larga distancia más grande del mundo, sigue siendo la única estructura física que cruza las fronteras de Arabia Saudita, Jordania, Siria, el Golán y el Líbano. Cuando la compañía estadounidense TAPline finalmente cerró después de décadas de conflicto regional, abandonaron la tubería in situ.

Los anillos pueden ser vistos como testigos de ese período de la historia. TAPline no sobrevivió a la primera Guerra del Golfo (1990-1991), al comienzo de la cual fue abandonada como resultado de la oposición de Arabia Saudita al apoyo de Jordania a Irak. Aunque en gran parte no contada, esta historia sigue siendo parte de la conciencia y la memoria popular, y creo que Tabet emplea este tema con elegancia y habilidad dentro de la galería.

Rayyane Tabet_TAB_starRayyane Tabet_TAB_rings2

Challenging South African local histories

Kemang Wa Lehulere
Not even the departed stay grounded
Marian Goodman gallery, London, UK
September 13 – October 20, 2018

We visited this art exhibition a couple of weeks ago at the Marian Goodman gallery in London and it’s now gone. But, nevertheless, I wanted to cover it to introduce you to this artist who is emerging as one of South Africa’s most prominent artistic exports.

As we entered the gallery, I encountered various installations and drawings on the wall made of various materials: wood, metal, chalk, glass and robe; all of them in black and white or the original material. It can be appreciated that the art show has a strong social message, but the artist hasn’t neglected the aesthetical aspects of it. Not only that, he used those aspects to enhance the message, which is something I strongly value. I like art exhibitions with a socio-political message, specially these days in which artists seem to have really strong tools to make us reflect about the society we live in, but I have a preference for the artworks that on top of that are aesthetically interesting.

Kemang Wa Lehulere was born in Cape-town and initially rose to prominence in 2006 with Gugulective, a community-engaged collective co-founded with childhood artistic associate, Unathi Sigenu and based in the former township of Gugulethu, Cape Town. He devoted himself at the time to community engaged performative actions such as creating pamphlets to challenge local histories or setting up interventionist pirate radio stations. Only after years of social activism, he started creating sculptural objects and drawings as a residue or remanent of performance. And he went into formal art education, graduating in 2011.

Drawing on these years of social activism, Wa Lehulere conveys feelings of post-apartheid unrest and other socio-political issues with his artworks, re-enacting what he considers to be ‘deleted scenes’ from South African history.

Some of the elements characteristic of his artistic practice include messages in bottles, sphinx-like ceramic dogs and bird houses that are symbols of the forced removals under apartheid. In addition, there were big boards covered with chalk drawings and various objects suspended by shoelaces from floor to ceiling. However, his most prominent pieces are reconfigured salvaged school desks in wood and metal or just in metal, as we can see on various images below, all of them referring to the 1976 student demonstrations.

Finally, his interest in the Dogon people of Mali and their indigenous astrological knowledge will be reflected in many of the new works, as well as the controversy surrounding his knowledge of the existence of Sirius, a dwarf moon invisible to the naked eye orbiting the Dog Star, despite not having access to astronomical instruments. Kemang used laces to form star constellations, referring not only to the racist repudiation, but also to the repeated negation of opportunities for contemporary young black South Africans.

This art show tells me that art is a powerful tool to express our concerns about the world we live in and not only that, artists like Wa Lehuler manage to do that using a very personal style and effective visual elements.


Desafiando las historias locales de Sudáfrica
Kemang Wa Lehulere
Ni siquiera los difuntos se quedan en tierra.
Galería Marian Goodman, Londres, Reino Unido
13 de septiembre – 20 de octubre de 2018

Visitamos esta exposición de arte hace un par de semanas en la galería Marian Goodman en Londres y ahora ya no está. Pero, he querido cubrirla para presentaros a este artista que se está emergiendo como una de las figuras artísticas más destacadas de Sudáfrica.

Cuando entramos en la galería, encontré varias instalaciones y dibujos en la pared hechos de varios materiales: madera, metal, tiza, vidrio, etc; todos ellos en blanco y negro o en el material original. Se puede apreciar que la muestra de arte tiene un fuerte mensaje social, pero el artista no ha descuidado sus aspectos estéticos. No solo eso, utiliza esos aspectos para ensalzar el mensaje, lo cual valoro ciertamente. Me gustan las muestras de arte con un mensaje socio-político, especialmente en estos días en los que los artistas parecen tener herramientas realmente efectivas para hacernos reflexionar sobre la sociedad en que vivimos, pero tengo preferencia por las obras de arte que, además de eso, son estéticamente interesantes.

Kemang Wa Lehulere nació en Ciudad del Cabo e inicialmente se destacó en 2006 con Gugulective, un colectivo comprometido con la comunidad y cofundado con su socio artístico de la infancia, Unathi Sigenu, y residente en la antigua ciudad de Gugulethu, Ciudad del Cabo. En ese momento se dedicó a hacer demostraciones comprometidas con la comunidad, como crear folletos para desafiar las historias locales o establecer estaciones de radio piratas intervencionistas. Solo después de años de activismo social, comenzó a crear objetos escultóricos y dibujos como un residuo o remanente de su lucha social. Y obtuvo formación artística académica al graduarse en 2011.

Haciendo uso de estos años de activismo social, Wa Lehulere transmite sentimientos de inquietud posterior al apartheid y otros problemas sociopolíticos con sus obras de arte, recreando lo que él considera “escenas borradas” de la historia de Sudáfrica.

Algunos de los elementos característicos de su práctica artística incluyen mensajes en botellas, perros de cerámica con forma de esfinge y casas de aves que simbolizan los retiros forzosos bajo el apartheid. Además, hay tablas grandes cubiertas con dibujos de tiza y varios objetos suspendidos por cordones desde el suelo hasta el techo. Sin embargo, sus piezas más prominentes se reconfiguran como escritorios escolares recuperados en madera y metal o simplemente en metal, como podemos ver en varias imágenes a continuación, todas ellas en referencia a las demostraciones estudiantiles de 1976.

Finalmente, su interés en la gente Dogon de Mali y su conocimiento astrológico indígena se reflejará en muchas de las nuevas obras, así como en la controversia que rodea su conocimiento de la existencia de Sirio, una luna enana invisible a simple vista que orbita alrededor de Dog Star, a pesar de no tener acceso a instrumentos astronómicos. Kemang usó cordones para formar constelaciones de estrellas, refiriéndose no solo al repudio racista, sino también a la negación repetida de oportunidades para los jóvenes sudafricanos negros contemporáneos.

Esta muestra de arte me dice que el arte es una herramienta poderosa para expresar nuestras preocupaciones sobre el mundo en que vivimos, y no solo eso, artistas como Wa Lehuler logran hacerlo usando un estilo muy personal y elementos visuales realmente interesantes y efectivos.

Wa Lehulere - The art blackberryWa lehulere - The art blueberryWa Lehulere - 3 sisters