Marvellous evocative sculptures

Cy Twombly
Sculpture
30 September – 21 December, 2019
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

This is a past art exhibition there was at the Gagosian art gallery in London at the end of last year. I’d to talk about it here because I didn’t have the time to do it while it was on and I really like this artist.

As we came into the gallery, we were surrounded by multiple sculpture pieces spread all over the two main gallery spaces. Many of Twombly’s sculptures are coated in white paint and are evocative of classical sculptures, where white is his “marble”. Some of them allude to architecture, geometry, and Egyptian and Mesopotamian statuary, as in the rectangular pedestals and circular structures.

Twombly made these sculptures on show out of found materials such as plaster, wood and iron. They are mostly modest in scale and can be easily associated to his paintings. The white paint over these materials gives them a very interesting texture that even tempted me to touch them.

As well as his paintings, the sculptures evoke narratives from antiquity and fragments of literature and poetry. However, as the artist said in an interview with David Sylvester for his exhibition at Kunstmuseum Basel in 2000, the demands of making sculpture were very different from those of painting. “[Sculpture is] a whole other state. And it’s a building thing. Whereas the painting is more fusing—fusing of ideas, fusing of feelings, fusing projected on atmosphere.” It seems to me that he envisioned sculpture more like a LEGO figure, whereas painting was more like a recipe in which you mix different ingredients to create a new dish.

Apart from the white sculptures, we came across others colours. A few of the sculptures were pink and we found that it was the perfect tone of pink for my colleague, The art blackberry, to interact with the artworks because she was wearing a coat with the same pink. The aesthetical qualities of these pictures can be appreciated below.

I hope we get to see a new art show on Cy Twombly’s painting or sculpture soon. I enjoyed looking at his sculptures, but I always enjoy his paintings more because they have more readings to me. But, of course, this is a personal preference you may not agree with. The last Twombly’s art show I really enjoyed was back in 2011 at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, where he was exhibited alongside Poussin, an artist deeply admired by him.


 

Maravillosas esculturas evocadoras

Cy Twombly
Escultura
30 de septiembre – 21 de diciembre de 2019
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, Londres

Esta es una exposición de arte pasada que hubo en la galería Gagosian en Londres a finales del año pasado. Me gustaría hablar sobre ella aquí, porque no tuve tiempo de hacerlo mientras estaba abierta, y me gusta este artista.

Según entramos en la galería, nos sentimos rodeadas de múltiples piezas de escultura repartidas por los dos espacios principales de la galería. Muchas de las esculturas de Twombly están recubiertas de pintura blanca, y evocan esculturas clásicas donde el blanco es su “mármol”. Algunas de ellas aluden a la arquitectura, la geometría y las estatuas egipcias y mesopotámicas, como en los pedestales rectangulares y las estructuras circulares.

Twombly hizo estas esculturas en exposición con materiales encontrados como yeso, madera y hierro. En su mayoría son de escala modesta y se pueden asociar fácilmente a sus pinturas. La pintura blanca sobre estos materiales les da una textura muy interesante que parece invitarnos a tocarlas. 

Además de sus pinturas, las esculturas evocan narrativas de la antigüedad y fragmentos de literatura y poesía. Sin embargo, como dijo el artista en una entrevista con David Sylvester para su exposición en el Kunstmuseum Basel en 2000, las demandas de hacer esculturas eran muy diferentes de las de la pintura. “[La escultura es] un estado completamente diferente. Tiene que ver con construcción. Mientras que la pintura se fusiona más: fusión de ideas, fusión de sentimientos, fusión proyectada en la atmósfera “. Parece que imaginó la escultura más como una figura de LEGO, mientras que la pintura era más como una receta donde se mezclan diferentes ingredientes para crear un nuevo plato.

Además de las esculturas blancas, encontramos otros colores. Algunas de las esculturas eran de color rosa y descubrimos que era el tono rosado perfecto para mi colega, The art blackberry, para interactuar con las obras de arte porque llevaba un abrigo del mismo color rosa. Las cualidades estéticas de estas imágenes se pueden apreciar a continuación.

Espero que podamos ver una nueva muestra de arte de pintura o escultura de Cy Twombly pronto. Disfruté viendo sus esculturas, pero siempre disfruto más de sus pinturas porque tienen más lecturas para mí. Por supuesto, esto es una preferencia personal con la que puedes no estar de acuerdo. La última muestra de arte de Twombly que realmente disfruté fue en 2011 en la Dulwich Picture Gallery, donde fue expuesto junto a Poussin, un artista profundamente admirado por Twombly.

Retelling stories through found objects

Rayyane Tabet
Encounters
24 September – 14 December 2019
Parasol Unit foundation for contemporary art, London, UK
Free entry

The current art show at Parasol Unit that finishes this week is by Beirut-born and based artist Rayyane Tabet, who presents here 8 works from the past 13 years, installed together for the first time. I didn’t know this artist previously, but I was pleasantly surprised by his work. The minimalist quality of his artworks comes along with historial and cultural references to his birthplace of Lebanon that he combines sometimes with personal stories.

The artist appears to be interested in communicating an alternative view of the main political and economic events that have taken place in his country in recent years. Not only that, with his artwork he wants to contribute to the outside world’s understanding of this complex place.

All of the above, helps the visitor to connect better with his work. Tabet takes inspiration from overlooked objects that he wraps with personal anecdotes and supranational histories. According to Tabet, how Lebanon is perceived by the outside world and even by Lebaneses has no common version in history textbooks. Children in different communities are taught different versions of history.

“I’m interested in the question of whether we could create a history told by objects and materials. A lot of the time those last longer than people and are able to overcome moments of violence and marginalisation in a way that people cannot.” the artist says. 

On the ground floor, at the back of the gallery The art berries found a big red star hanging from the ceiling together with a red horse among other objects. We liked the star for some art interaction. See some photos below.

Another artwork very relevant in the show is a couple of oars of a rowing boat. The artist’s father was going to use that boat to escape their home country for Cyprus. The operation was aborted and long after that attempt of fleeting the family re-encounter the same boat by accident. The artist purchased it and decided to use as one of his artworks.

And finally, our favourite artwork on this exhibition was “Steel Rings” (2013–), a sequence of 28 rolled-steel rings arranged in a line. We liked this work for its minimalist simplicity and because it was a good art piece to interact with. Not particularly novel at first sight. But, when you pay a closer look at it and read about why the artist has chosen to display this work, you’ll be much more intrigued. Each of these rings is engraved with a distance and location in longitude and latitude, marking a specific place along the now defund Trans-Arabian Pipeline (TAPline). Built in 1947 by an alliance of US oil companies, and once the world’s largest long-distance oil pipeline, is still the only physical structure that crosses the borders of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Syria, the Golan, and Lebanon. When the American TAPline company finally closed down after decades of regional conflict, they abandoned the pipeline in situ.

The rings can be seen as a witness to that period of history. Tapline did not survive the first Gulf War (1990–91), at the onset of which it was abandoned as a result of Saudi Arabia’s opposition to Jordan’s support of Iraq. Although largely untold, this story remains part of popular consciousness and memory, and I believe that Tabet brings up the subject elegantly and skillfully inside the gallery.


 

Volver a contar historias a través de objetos encontrados

Rayyane Tabet
Encuentros
24 de septiembre – 14 de diciembre de 2019
Parasol Unit, Londres, Reino Unido.
Entrada libre

La exposición de arte que hay ahora en Parasol Unit y que termina esta semana es de Rayyane Tabet, un artista nacido y ubicado en Beirut que presenta aquí 8 obras de los últimos 13 años, instaladas juntas por primera vez. No conocía a este artista anteriormente, pero su trabajo me sorprendió gratamente. La calidad minimalista de sus obras de arte se acompaña de referencias históricas y culturales a su lugar de nacimiento del Líbano que a veces combina con historias personales.

El artista parece estar interesado en comunicar una visión alternativa de los principales acontecimientos políticos y económicos que han tenido lugar en su país en los últimos años. No solo eso, con sus obras de arte quiere contribuir a la comprensión externa de este complejo lugar. 

Todo lo anterior, ayuda al visitante a conectar mejor con su trabajo. Tabet se inspira en objetos pasados ​​por alto, que envuelve en anécdotas personales e historias supranacionales. Según Tabet, cómo el Líbano es percibido por el mundo exterior e incluso por los libaneses no tiene una versión común en los libros de texto de historia. A los niños de diferentes comunidades se les enseñan diferentes versiones de la historia.

“Me interesa la cuestión de si podríamos crear una historia contada por objetos y materiales. Muchas veces duran más que las personas y son capaces de superar los momentos de violencia y marginación de una manera que la gente no puede “, dice el artista. 

En la parte posterior de la planta baja de la galería, The art berries encontramos una gran estrella roja colgando del techo junto con un caballo rojo entre otros objetos. Nos gustó la estrella para interactuar y tomar alguna foto. Podrás ver algunas fotos a continuación.

Otra obra de arte muy relevante en la exposición es un par de remos de un bote. El padre del artista iba a usar ese bote para escapar de su país de origen hacia Chipre. La operación fue abortada y mucho después de ese intento de huir de la familia se reencontró con el mismo bote  por accidente. El artista lo compró y decidió usarlo como una de sus obras de arte.

Y finalmente, nuestra obra de arte favorita en esta exposición fue Steel Rings (2013–), una secuencia de 28 anillos de acero laminado dispuestos en una línea. Nos gusto esta obra estéticamente por su simplicidad minimalista y como pieza de arte con la cual interactuar. No es particularmente novedosa a primera vista. Sin embargo, cuando echas un vistazo más de cerca y lees sobre por qué el artista ha elegido mostrar este trabajo, estarás mucho más intrigado. Cada uno de estos anillos está grabado con una distancia y ubicación en longitud y latitud, marcando un lugar específico a lo largo de la tubería Trans-Arabian (TAPline). Construido en 1947 por una alianza de compañías petroleras estadounidenses, y que una vez fue el oleoducto de larga distancia más grande del mundo, sigue siendo la única estructura física que cruza las fronteras de Arabia Saudita, Jordania, Siria, el Golán y el Líbano. Cuando la compañía estadounidense TAPline finalmente cerró después de décadas de conflicto regional, abandonaron la tubería in situ.

Los anillos pueden ser vistos como testigos de ese período de la historia. TAPline no sobrevivió a la primera Guerra del Golfo (1990-1991), al comienzo de la cual fue abandonada como resultado de la oposición de Arabia Saudita al apoyo de Jordania a Irak. Aunque en gran parte no contada, esta historia sigue siendo parte de la conciencia y la memoria popular, y creo que Tabet emplea este tema con elegancia y habilidad dentro de la galería.

Rayyane Tabet_TAB_starRayyane Tabet_TAB_rings2

Looking for the real self

Doug Aitken
Return to the Real
2 October – 20 December 2019
Victoria Miro I, London, UK

Back to the art world and back on form. Not to say that I haven’t seen art exhibitions since my last post, but I’ve been busy with other things and I couldn’t find the time to post. Apologies to my readers. Here I am again and hopefully back on track every other week.

One of the last exhibitions seen by The art berries was “Return to the Real” by Doug Aitken, which I found interesting from both an aesthetic and an spiritual perspective.

As you enter the art show, the space downstairs is a dark room where you can see a translucent young woman resting on a table with her mobile phone out of reach and other elements with the same shiny appearance. Her groceries still on the plastic bag next to her. She hasn’t had a chance to put them in place. She’s surrounded by light boxes, illuminated dreamscapes, swimming pools, aeroplanes images, unmade white lovely beds and all sort of references to the life we lead in the contemporary world. A world dominated by technology that keep us distracted with images of how to scape from our daily routine and travel far away. Perhaps for just a week, maximum a month, but enough to keep us working towards that goal. Will our heroine find herself amid all these?

The response could lie upstairs. When you climb up the stairs you can see a female form in the middle of a scene dominated by moving sonic sculptures. The scene is like a contemplative scene. The moving sculptures are circular steel wind chimes that rotate in front of a flickering screen. Our heroine is carved in marble, Aitken, says, with ‘deep geological time’ and is bisected in two parts to reveal a mirrored interior. I wonder whether this is the same girl from downstairs who’s managed to find her real self. I do hope so!

Dough Aitken is an an American artist and filmmaker whose work has been featured in multiple places around the world.


 

Buscando el verdadero yo

Doug Aitken
Return to the Real
2 de octubre – 20 de diciembre de 2019
Victoria Miro I, Londres, Reino Unido

De vuelta al mundo del arte y de vuelta en forma. No quiere decir que no haya visto exposiciones de arte desde mi último post, pero he estado ocupada con otras cosas y no he podido encontrar tiempo para publicar. Disculpas a mis lectores. Aquí estoy de nuevo y espero estar de vuelta cada dos semanas.

Una de las últimas exhibiciones vistas por The art berries fue “Return to the Real” de Doug Aitken, la cual me pareció interesante tanto desde una perspectiva estética como espiritual. Al entrar en la exposición de arte, el espacio de abajo es una habitación oscura donde puedes ver a una joven translúcida descansando sobre una mesa con su teléfono móvil fuera del alcance y otros elementos con la misma apariencia brillante. Su compra todavía en una bolsa de plástico a su lado. No ha tenido la oportunidad de ponerla en su sitio. Está rodeada de cajas de luz, paisajes oníricos iluminados, piscinas, imágenes de aviones, camas blancas sin hacer y todo tipo de referencias a la vida que llevamos en el mundo contemporáneo. Un mundo dominado por la tecnología que nos mantiene distraídos con imágenes de cómo escapar de nuestra rutina diaria y viajar lejos. Tal vez solo por una semana, un máximo de un mes, pero lo suficiente como para mantenernos trabajando hacia ese objetivo. Conseguirá nuestra heroína encontrarse a si misma en medio de todo esto?

La respuesta podría estar arriba. Cuando subes las escaleras puedes ver una forma femenina en medio de una escena dominada por esculturas sonoras en movimiento. La escena es como una escena contemplativa. Las esculturas en movimiento son campanillas de viento circulares de acero que giran frente a una pantalla parpadeante. Nuestra heroína está tallada en mármol, dice Aitken, con “tiempo geológico profundo” y está dividida en dos partes para revelar un interior de espejo. Me pregunto si esta es la misma chica de abajo que ha logrado encontrar su verdadero yo. ¡Espero que sí!

Dough Aitken es un artista y cineasta estadounidense cuyo trabajo se ha presentado en múltiples lugares del mundo.

Aitken5_ladyAitken6_bed

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The rat king with monkeys

NS Harsha
11 April – 18 May
Victoria Miro Gallery I, London

The art berries visited this art exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery and we’d like to share a few photos here despite the show is now finished. I’m sure you’ll be able to see more work from NS Harsha  in another big city sometime soon.

The artwork we focused on is “Tamasha” (2013), an installation of larger-than-life size monkeys that appear onto a scaffolding structure. The monkeys are pointing upwards to the heavens while their tails are intertwined and tied to each other. The word Tamasha can refer to political upheaval or even human folly. Moreover, Harsha refers to the phenomenon of the rat king and its appearance in northern folklore traditions since the sixteenth century, where rat kings are associated with various superstitions and were often seen as a bad omen for being associated with plagues.

See The art blackberry below interacting with this artwork pointing to the heavens and placing herself next to the scaffolding, where the monkeys are suspended and tether to each other. Since monkeys are our ancestors, it seems plausible to me to take part on this installation :-P.

NS Harsha (born 1969) is an Indian artist born and based in Mysore. He works in many media including painting, sculpture, site-specific installation, and public works. His works “depict daily experiences in Mysore, southern India, where he is based, but also reflect wider cultural, political and economic globalization issues” and explore the “absurdity of the real world, representation and abstraction, and repeating images”. His practice has been inspired by Indian popular and miniature painting. (Source: Wikipedia).


 

El rey de las ratas con monos

NS Harsha
11 de abril – 18 de mayo
Victoria Miro Gallery I, Londres

The art berries visitamos esta exposición de arte en la galería Victoria Miró y nos gustaría compartir algunas fotos aquí a pesar de que la muestra ya ha terminado. Estoy segura de que pronto podrás ver más trabajos de NS Harsha en otra gran ciudad dentro de poco.

La obra de arte en la que nos enfocamos es “Tamasha” (2013), una instalación de monos de tamaño más grande que en la realidad que aparecen en una estructura de andamios. Los monos apuntan hacia el cielo mientras que sus colas están entrelazadas y unidas entre sí. La palabra Tamasha puede referirse a agitación política o incluso locura humana. Además, Harsha se refiere al fenómeno del rey de las ratas y su aparición en las tradiciones populares del norte desde el siglo XVI, donde los reyes de las ratas se asocian con varias supersticiones y se consideran a menudo como un mal presagio por estar asociados con plagas.

Debajo puedes ver a The art blackberry interactuando con esta obra de arte y apuntando al cielo, mientras se pega a los andamios donde los monos están suspendidos y atados entre sí. Dado que los monos son nuestros antepasados, me parece plausible participar en esta instalación :-P.

NS Harsha (nacido en 1969) es un artista indio nacido y residente en Mysore. Trabaja en muchos medios, como pintura, escultura, instalación específica del sitio y obras públicas. Sus trabajos “representan experiencias cotidianas en Mysore, en el sur de la India, donde se basa, pero también reflejan temas más amplios de globalización cultural, política y económica” y exploran el “absurdo del mundo real, la representación y la abstracción, y la repetición de imágenes”. Su práctica se ha inspirado en la pintura popular y en miniatura de la India. (Fuente: Wikipedia).

NS Harsha_Theartblacberryfurther

Exploring space with sculpture

Phyllida Barlow
cul-de-sac
23 February – 23 June 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

After nearly two months without posting anything here, I’m finally back! I have a good excuse for being so quiet since January. My son Samuel was born on the 9th February and I have been really busy and enjoying his company since then.

Nevertheless, there’s a good art show now in London that I wanted to share with you. British sculptor Phyllida Barlow has currently an art exhibition at the contemporary galleries of the Royal Academy of Arts, which will be on until the end of the spring. The art berries went to visit it and I’m sharing it with you here, so you don’t miss one of the best art shows in London this season.

The photos you can see from The art berries below have been taken as usual with an iPhone. We’ve interacted with the artworks and bring you an intimate and personal approach of the art pieces we found more interesting.

As we entered the gallery space, we came across two huge sculptures. One of them is a vertical structure formed by various colourful canvases. A playful and intriguing art piece that traps your attention from the very beginning of the exhibition. From the photos below, you can see The art blackberry next to this piece. She appears to be in conversation with a colourful group of individuals.

As we moved along the art show, a new interesting sculpture is revealed. It reminds me of an amphitheatre with a semicircular seating gallery space sustained by multiple beams that go in different directions. You can see how we blend with the sculpture and contribute to this perception.

Finally, a series of pictures are presented below with The art blackberry amid a forest of inclined beams. In this pictures, her fragility is accentuated by the the menacing beams above her.

In February, Barlow created this exhibition that brings her own interpretation of a residential cul-de-sac. By closing the exit door in the final room, Barlow forced the viewer to turn around and revisit each sculpture anew from the other side. She created forests of seemingly precarious structures and uses them to explore the full height of the gallery space with looming beams, blocks and canvases.

Thresholds, the artist has said, are fascinating places, where you pass through from one space to another. Always seeking the surprise, Barlow expects the work to take her into a  journey, rather than her deciding upon that journey.

Her source of inspiration is in the everyday from a farm to an industrial state. Because of that, Barlow uses everyday materials such as plywood, expanding foam, polystyrene, plaster, cement, plastic piping, Polyfilla, tape, etc. and remind us to look at them in a new context with a new light. They are so common in our world that we’ve stopped even seeing them.

Barlow studied at Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) and the Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). She later taught at both schools and was Professor of Fine Art and Director of Undergraduate Studies at the latter until 2009.


Explorando el espacio con escultura

Phyllida Barlow
Callejón sin salida
23 de febrero – 23 de junio de 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

Después de casi dos meses sin publicar nada aquí, ¡por fin estoy de vuelta! Tengo una buena excusa para estar tan callada desde enero. Mi hijo Samuel nació el 9 de febrero y he estado muy liada y disfrutando de su compañía desde entonces.

De cualquier manera, hay una buena exposición de arte ahora en Londres que quería compartir contigo. La escultora británica Phyllida Barlow tiene desde febrero una exposición en las galerías contemporáneas de la Royal Academy of Arts, que estará abierta hasta el final de la primavera. The art berries fuimos a visitarla y la comparto aquí contigo para que no te pierdas una de las mejores muestras de arte en Londres esta temporada.

Las fotos que puedes ver a continuación en The art berries  se han tomado como siempre con un iPhone. Hemos interactuado con las obras de arte y te brindamos un enfoque intimo y personal de las piezas que encontramos más interesantes.

Cuando entramos en el espacio de la galería, nos encontramos con dos esculturas enormes. Una de ellas es una estructura vertical formada por varios lienzos de colores. Una escultura divertida e intrigante que capta tu atención desde el principio de la exposición. En las fotos que capturamos debajo, puedes ver a The art blackberry junto a esta pieza. Parece estar en conversación con un grupo colorido de individuos.

 

A medida que avanzamos en la muestra de arte, aparece una nueva e interesante escultura. Me recuerda a un anfiteatro con un espacio semicircular en la galería de asientos sostenido por múltiples vigas que van en distintas direcciones. Puedes ver como nos mezclamos con la escultura y contribuimos a esta percepción.

Finalmente, a continuación se puede ver una serie de imágenes con The art blackberry en medio de un bosque de vigas inclinadas. En estas imágenes, su fragilidad se ve acentuada por las vigas que hay sobre ella.

En febrero, Barlow creó esta exposición que trae su propia interpretación de un callejón sin salida residencial. Al cerrar la puerta de salida en la sala final, Barlow obligó al espectador a darse la vuelta y volver a visitar cada escultura desde el otro lado. Creó bosques de estructuras aparentemente precarias y las utiliza para explorar la altura completa del espacio de la galería con vigas, bloques y lienzos que parece que se van a caer de un moment a otro.

Los umbrales, ha dicho la artista, son lugares fascinantes, donde se pasa de un espacio a otro. Siempre buscando la sorpresa, Barlow espera que el trabajo la lleve a un viaje, en lugar de que ella decida sobre ese viaje.

Su fuente de inspiración está en lo cotidiano, desde una granja hasta un estado industrial. Debido a eso, Barlow utiliza materiales cotidianos como madera contrachapada, espuma expandida, poliestireno, yeso, cemento, tuberías de plástico, Polyfilla, cinta, etc. y nos recuerdan mirarlos en un nuevo contexto, con una nueva luz. Son tan comunes en nuestro mundo que hemos dejado de verlos.

Barlow estudió en el Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) y en la Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). Más tarde enseñó en ambas escuelas y fue profesora de Bellas Artes y Directora de Estudios de Pre-grado en esta última hasta el 2009.

PB_The art berries_colour blocks2PB_The art berries_colour blocks1PB-The art berries_amphitheatrePB_The art berries_small sculpturePB_The art berries_black1PB_The art berries_black3PB_The art berries_black4PB_The art berries_black2

Intricate pretty art pieces

Anni Albers
11 October 2018 – 27 January 2019
Tate Modern, London, UK

We were at Tate Modern last week visiting the art exhibition of Anni Albers (1899-1994), an artist who combined the art of hand-weaving with the language of modern art and what I believe is one the best art shows in London at the moment. Do not miss it, because it’s finishing soon.

Featuring over 350 objects from small-scale pieces and studies to large wall-hangings, jewellery and textiles designed for mass production, the show explores the intersection between art and craft, hand-weaving and machine production, ancient and modern art. It opened ahead of the centenary of the Bauhaus in 2019 and recognises Albers contribution to modern art and design.

I believe that the hand-weaving pieces presented at the art show are really diverse in shape, colour and size. It seems to me that she kept experimenting with design, techniques and materials all her life, yet keeping a very personal style.

Each artwork is like a little treasure made with great care and deep thinking. For instance, she turned everyday objects into precious jewellery pieces, and explored the use of many textures and materials for different and interesting results.

I liked the large wall-hangings with abstract patterns as well as the small-scale pieces that show a great attention to detail. In addition, there’s a central big room in the exhibition that displays various wall-hangings similar to blinds of Japanese inspiration that we decided to use for our photos, as they are good to reflect about the contemporary art space and the interaction of the body within that space.

Born in Berlin at the turn of the century, Annelise Else Frieda Fleischmann became a student at the Bauhaus in 1922, where she met her husband Josef Albers and other key modernist figures like Paul Klee.

The Bauhaus was a German art school that was opened from 1919 to 1933 and had a profound influence upon subsequent developments in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design and typography. Although, the Bauhaus aspired to gender equality, women were still discouraged from learning certain disciplines including painting. Anni Albers began weaving by default, but it was in textiles that she found her means of expression, dedicating herself to the medium for the majority of her career. 

With the rise of Nazism and the closure of the Bauhaus, Albers left Germany in 1933 for the USA where she taught at the experimental Black Mountain College for over 15 years. She made frequent visits to Mexico, Chile and Peru, where she bought an extensive collection of ancient Pre-Columbian textiles.  In both her work and her writing, she presents a vastly expanded geography of modern art, drawing on sources from Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Visiting the show was a very stimulating experience and I feeI that it would be so for those of you who like modern art, crafts and design as much as I do.


Piezas de arte intrincadas y bonitas

Anni Albers
11 de octubre de 2018 – 27 de enero de 2019
Tate Modern, Londres, Reino Unido

Estuvimos en Tate Modern la semana pasada visitando la exposición de arte de Anni Albers (1899-1994), una artista que combinó el arte del tejido a mano con el lenguaje del arte moderno y la que en mi opinión es una de los mejores muestras de arte que hay ahora en Londres. No te lo pierdas, porque termina pronto.

Con más de 350 objetos, desde piezas a pequeña escala y estudios hasta grandes tapices, joyas y textiles diseñados para la producción en masa, la muestra explora la intersección entre arte y artesanía, tejido a mano y producción de maquinaria, arte antiguo y moderno. Se inauguró antes del centenario de la Bauhaus en 2019 y reconoce la contribución de Anni Albers al arte y diseño modernos.

Creo que las piezas de tejido a mano presentadas en la muestra de arte son muy diversas en forma, color y tamaño. Me parece que Albers siguió experimentando con el diseño, las técnicas y los materiales durante toda su vida, pero manteniendo un estilo muy personal.

Cada obra de arte es como un pequeño tesoro hecho con gran cuidado y pensamiento profundo. Por ejemplo, convirtió objetos cotidianos en preciosas piezas de joyería, y exploró el uso de muchas texturas y materiales para obtener resultados diferentes e interesantes.

 

Me gustaron los obras mas grandes con diseños abstractos, así como las piezas a pequeña escala que muestran una gran atención al detalle. Además, hay una gran sala central en la exposición que muestra varias obras similares a estores o cortinas de inspiración japonesa que decidimos usar para algunas de nuestras fotos, ya que nos parecieron buenas para reflexionar sobre el espacio contemporáneo y la interacción del cuerpo dentro de ese espacio.

Nacida en Berlín a principios de siglo, Annelise Else Frieda Fleischmann se convirtió en estudiante de la Bauhaus en 1922, donde conoció a su esposo Josef Albers y otras figuras modernistas clave como Paul Klee.

La Bauhaus fue una escuela de arte alemana que se abrió de 1919 a 1933 y tuvo una profunda influencia en los desarrollos posteriores en arte, arquitectura, diseño gráfico, diseño de interiores, diseño industrial y tipografía. Aunque, la Bauhaus aspiraba a la igualdad de genero, las mujeres fueron desanimadas a aprender ciertas disciplinas, incluida la pintura. Anni Albers comenzó a tejer por defecto, pero fue en los textiles donde encontró su medio de expresión, dedicándose a ello durante la mayor parte de su carrera.

Con el auge del nazismo y el cierre de la Bauhaus, Albers abandonó Alemania en 1933 para ir a los Estados Unidos, donde enseñó en el experimental Black Mountain College durante más de 15 años. Hizo visitas frecuentes a México, Chile y Perú, donde compró una extensa colección de textiles antiguos precolombinos. Tanto en su trabajo como en su escritura, presenta una geografía muy amplia del arte moderno, basándose en fuentes de África, Asia y América.

Visitar la exposición fue una experiencia muy estimulante y creo que lo sería para aquellos de vosotros a los que os guste el arte moderno, la artesanía y el diseño tanto como a mi.

anni albers-the art blueberry backanni albers-the art blackberry standinganni albers-the art blueberry pregnant

anni albers-the art blackberrry lying

 

Capturing the mood of the moment

Turner Prize
26 September 2018 – 6 January 2019
Tate Britain, London, UK

If you’re in London this Christmas and would like to see an art exhibition, the Turner Prize is worth to pay a visit. What is one of the best-known prizes for visual arts in the world is formed entirely by film, video and moving image this year. So, if you want to see the four art pieces presented in full you’d have to count on over 4,5 hours. But, I’d say we didn’t spend that long at this exhibition. The medium allows you to be flexible with how you experience it, and it doesn’t have to be as lineal as when we go to the cinema.

I was not surprised about finding the same type of work on the four pieces shown this year. It does capture the mood of the present moment by using moving image for a political purpose.

As it is presented, there are four rooms connected by a central space filled in with sofas and printed material that reminds you a bit of a dentist waiting room. Nevertheless, I liked this set up; considering that you have to enter the darkness to watch each of the art pieces, I appreciate you can go back to a well lit space in between them.

On one hand we have the multidisciplinary collective Forensic Architecture based at Goldsmith University that includes architects, filmmakers, lawyers and scientists. All combine their skills to investigate allegations of state violence. They don’t consider themselves an art group as such, and like looking at real events. In the work presented they use different patient techniques to uncover what happened on a night of 2017, when Israeli police  attempted to clear a Bedouin village, an action that resulted in two deaths. It was an stressful film for the watcher and for the film makers, who even put their life at risk to make it.

Then, Naeem Mohaiemen separates from real events to present a fictional piece in which a solitary man wanders through the ruins of an abandoned airport, like a character from JG Ballard. He bases this piece on his dad’s experience years ago when he had to spend 9 days at a Greek airport. Using films, installations and essays, his practice make sense of political events in the 70s, while he investigate the legacies of decolonisation among others. A rather surreal film.

Thirdly, we saw Luke Willis Thompson’s piece, who works across film, performance, installations and sculpture to explore cases of institutional violence, race, class and social inequality among others. He presented a controversial film in 35mm of Diamond Reynolds, a lady who used her mobile phone in 2016 to live-stream on Facebook the killing of her partner by police in the US state of Minnesota. We liked this silent piece, and The art blackberry interacted with it as you can see below adding another layer to the piece. The use of a 35mm projector contributed to making this piece more organic and real, and as a consequence, very effective emotionally speaking.

Finally, we saw the work of this year’s winner, Charlotte Prodder, who was not announced as a winner when we saw the art show, but last week. She works with moving image, sculpture and printed image to explore queer identity, landscape, language technology and time, and has recently been chosen to represent Scotland at the Venice Biennale. Her work filmed on an iPhone is poetic and captivating, and I also enjoyed watching it.

The last two works were my favourites. Luke Willis Thompson because of the controversial message he presents with the use of 35mm, a great medium. And Charlotte Prodder because her film made with an iPhone is very personal and poetic and many people will identify with it.


Capturando el estado de ánimo del momento

Turner Prize
26 de septiembre de 2018 – 6 de enero de 2019
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido

Si estás en Londres estas Navidades y te apetece ver una exposición de arte, vale la pena visitar el Turner Prize. Este año, el que es uno de los premios de artes visuales más conocidos del mundo está formado en su totalidad por películas, videos e imágenes en movimiento. Por lo tanto, si deseas ver las cuatro obras de arte presentadas en su totalidad, tendrás que contar con más de 4 horas y media. Pero, nosotras no pasamos tanto tiempo viendo esta exposición. El medio en que se presenta te permite ser flexible con la forma en que lo experimentas, y no tiene que ser tan lineal como cuando vamos al cine.

No me sorprendió encontrar el mismo tipo de trabajo en las cuatro piezas presentadas este año. Captura el estado de ánimo que vivimos actualmente gracias al uso de imágenes en movimiento para un propósito político.

Tal como está expuesto, hay cuatro habitaciones conectadas por un espacio central con sofás y material impreso que recuerda un poco a la sala de espera de un dentista. Sin embargo, me gusta esta presentación; teniendo en cuenta que debes estar en la oscuridad para ver cada una de las piezas de arte, se agradece volver a un espacio bien iluminado entre ellas.

Por un lado, tenemos el colectivo multidisciplinario de Arquitectura Forense con sede en la Universidad de Goldsmith, que incluye arquitectos, cineastas, abogados y científicos. Todos combinan sus conocimiento para investigar denuncias de violencia estatal. No se consideran un grupo de arte como tal, y les gusta explorar eventos reales. En el trabajo presentado, utilizan diferentes técnicas pacientes para descubrir lo que sucedió una noche de 2017, cuando la policía israelí intentó despejar una aldea beduina, una acción que resultó en dos muertes. Es una película estresante tanto para el espectador, como para los cineastas, que incluso ponen su vida en riesgo para hacerla.

En segundo lugar, Naeem Mohaiemen se separa de los eventos reales para presentar una pieza ficticia en la que un hombre solitario recorre las ruinas de un aeropuerto abandonado, como un personaje de JG Ballard. El artista basa esta pieza en la experiencia de su padre hace años cuando tuvo que pasar 9 días en un aeropuerto griego. Utilizando películas, instalaciones y ensayos, su práctica da sentido a los acontecimientos políticos de los años 70, mientras investiga los legados de la descolonización entre otros. Una película bastante surrealista.

En tercer lugar, vimos la pieza de Luke Willis Thompson, que trabaja con cine, performance, instalaciones y esculturas para explorar casos de violencia institucional, raza, clase y desigualdad social, entre otros. Presentó una controvertida película en 35mm de Diamond Reynolds, una mujer que usó su teléfono móvil en 2016 para transmitir en directo en Facebook el asesinato de su compañero por parte de la policía en el estado de Minnesota, EE. UU. Nos gustó esta pieza silenciosa, y The art blackberry interactúa con ella, como se puede ver a continuación, añadiendo otra capa a la pieza. El uso de un proyector de 35 mm contribuye a hacer que esta pieza sea más orgánica y real y, en consecuencia, muy efectiva emocionalmente hablando.

Finalmente, vimos el trabajo de la ganadora de este año, Charlotte Prodder, quien no fue anunciada como ganadora cuando vimos la exhibición de arte, sino la semana pasada. Trabaja con imágenes en movimiento, esculturas e imágenes impresas para explorar la identidad de colectivos homosexuales, el paisaje, la tecnología del lenguaje y el tiempo, y ha sido elegida recientemente para representar a Escocia en la Bienal de Venecia. El trabajo que presenta filmado con un iPhone es bastante poético y cautivador, y también disfrutamos viéndolo.

Los dos últimos trabajos fueron mis favoritos. Luke Willis Thompson por el mensaje de gran controversia que presenta con el uso de película en 35mm, un gran medio. Y Charlotte Prodder porque su película hecha con un iPhone es muy personal y poética y muchas personas se identificarán con ella.

Turner Prize 2018-The art blackberry