Nature always survives

Rachel Whiteread
Internal Objects
April 12 – June 6, 2021
Gagosian gallery, Grosvenor Hill, London, UK

This is an art exhibition I saw months ago, but nonetheless I’d like to talk about it briefly here, since it’s from one of my favourite British artists, Rachel Whiteread. I’ve covered an art show she had at Tate Britain a few years ago. See here.

For the past forty years, Whiteread has made artworks using the method of casting with different materials and at different scales to explore traces of corporeal presence and reveal the negative spaces of common objects. However, for her major artworks in this exhibition (see Photo 1 below), Whiteread has replaced casting in favour of building original objects out of found wood and metal, which she over paints in white. The result was interesting to see, but to me it was as if these works had lost the essence of what she used to make with the recreation of negative spaces, the inner world of objects.

Having said that, I appreciate when artists explore new avenues to express themselves and communicate with their audiences. That’s what I understood about her artistic trajectory after watching the video available on the Gagosian gallery website, in which she talks about her work for this art exhibition with Iwona Blazwick, director of the Whitechapel Gallery in London. Both ladies reflect on the different qualities of Whiteread’s work. Her previous works were solid and impermeable, whereas her new ones are permeable and seem to be taken out of a catastrophic event. For the latest artworks, Whiteread has been using rubbish, different found objects, pieces of wood, etc. and has repurposed them. Her new structures have resilience.

We could also see other artworks in the exhibition more in consonance with her previous working process, like the pink and blue flags made out of papier-mâché, cast from corrugated iron (see Photo 2 below). The papier-mâché obtained from her children’s school books. Again re-purposing things from detritus and giving them a new life. I really liked the aesthetic qualities of these works as well as the other impressions on cardboard (see Photo 4 below), where she used first cardboard, then wax and finally bronze; the former pieces showed what’s left behind after a flood.

It seems that the contrast between her old and new works is well represented by the foundational works discussed on the video. “The baptism of Christ” by Piero della Francesca, and “The raft of the Medussa” by Théodore Géricault. The first one offers a view of serenity and calmness like the feeling I get from Whiteread’s previous works casting objects, while the second one offers a view of the sublime and catastrophe, more in relation to her latest works that appear to be overtaken by a sense of violence. Despite all our attempts to destroy nature as human beings, it always survive. It is humble and yet it survives, which gives me a feeling of hope.

Finally, just to mention that on the video we can also listen to Mark Waldron reciting his poem “In a wayward place,” and Max Richter performing “Origins (Solo)”, and original composition for solo piano from his 2021 album. Both performances worth to be listened to.


La naturaleza siempre sobrevive
Rachel Whiteread
Internal Objects
12 de abril – 6 de junio de 2021
Galería Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, Londres, Reino Unido.

Esta es una exposición de arte que ví hace meses, pero no obstante, me gustaría hablar de ella brevemente aquí por ser una de mis artistas británicas favoritas, Rachel Whiteread. Cubrí una exposición de arte que tuvo en la Tate Britain hace unos años. Mira aquí.

Durante los últimos cuarenta años, Whiteread ha realizado obras de arte utilizando el método de fundición con diferentes materiales y a diferentes escalas para explorar rastros de presencia corporal y revelar los espacios negativos de objetos comunes. Sin embargo, para sus principales obras de arte en esta exposición (mira Photo 1 debajo), Whiteread ha reemplazado la fundición a favor de construir objetos originales de madera y metal encontrados que pinta en blanco. El resultado fue interesante de ver, pero para mí fue como si estas obras hubieran perdido la esencia de lo que ella solía hacer con la recreación de espacios negativos, el mundo interior de los objetos.

Habiendo dicho eso, aprecio cuando los artistas exploran nuevas vías de expresión y comunicación con su público. Eso es lo que entendí de su trayectoria artística tras ver el vídeo disponible en la web de la galería Gagosian, en la que habla de su trabajo para esta exposición de arte con Iwona Blazwick, directora de la Whitechapel Gallery de Londres. Ambas mujeres reflexionan sobre las diferentes cualidades del trabajo de Whiteread. Sus trabajos anteriores eran sólidos e impermeables, mientras que los nuevos son permeables y parecen sacados de un evento catastrófico. Para las últimas obras de arte, Whiteread ha estado usando basura, diferentes objetos encontrados, trozos de madera, etc. y los ha reutilizado. Sus nuevas estructuras tienen resiliencia.

También pudimos ver otras obras de arte en la exposición más en consonancia con el proceso de trabajo anterior, como las banderas rosa y azul hechas de papel maché (mira Photo 2 debajo), fundido en hierro corrugado. El papel maché obtenido de los libros escolares de sus hijos. Nuevamente reutilizando las cosas de los detritos y dándoles una nueva vida. Me gustaron mucho las cualidades estéticas de estas obras así como las demás impresiones sobre cartón (mira Photo 4 debajo), donde utilizó primero cartón, luego cera y finalmente bronce; las primeras piezas mostraban lo que quedaba tras una inundación.

Parece que el contraste entre sus obras antiguas y nuevas está bien representado por las obras fundamentales discutidas en el video. “El bautismo de Cristo” de Piero della Francesca, y “La balsa de la Medussa” de Théodore Géricault. La primera ofrece una mirada de serenidad y tranquilidad como la mostrada en sus anteriores trabajos de fundición de objetos, y la segunda ofrece una visión de lo sublime y de catástrofe, más en relación con sus últimos trabajos que parecen estar poseídos por un sentimiento de violencia. A pesar de todos nuestros intentos de destruir la naturaleza como seres humanos, ella siempre sobrevive. Es humilde y, sin embargo, sobrevive, lo cual me aporta un sentimiento de esperanza.

Finalmente, solo mencionar que en el video también podemos escuchar a Mark Waldron recitando su poema “In a wayward place” y Max Richter interpretando “Origins (Solo)”, y composición original para piano solo de su álbum de 2021. Ambas actuaciones merecen ser escuchadas.

Photo 1
Photo 3
Photo 4
Photo 5

Contained horizons

Ugo Rondinone
a sky . a sea . distant mountains . horses . spring .
12 April – 22 May 2021
Sadie Coles, London, UK

The last art exhibition I saw that resonated with me was Ugo Rondinone’s at Sadie Coles this spring. I know it’s been been more than two months since I saw this show, but I hope you find his artworks as visually and conceptually exciting as I did.

Ugo Rondinone (born 1964) is a Swiss-born mixed-media artist based in New York. He studied at Hochschule für Angewandte Kunst, Vienna (1986-90), and has exhibited widely internationally. He’s particularly known for his temporary, large-scale land art sculptures such as Seven Magic Mountains (2016–2021), with its seven fluorescently-painted totems of large, car-size stones stacked 32 feet (9.8 m) high.

For this art exhibition I’m covering here, he showed a new version of Seven Magic Mountains at Davies Street (one of the venues at Sadie Coles), but in two dimensions. Each shaped canvas representing a painted rock stacked on top of each other and arranged vertically as you can see below.

I liked the reinvention of the totem with these paintings, but the artworks that I mostly enjoyed were the ones displayed at Kingly Street (Sadie Coles HQ venue), where Rondinone presented fifteen horses cast from blue glass. You could appreciate how they had been bisected horizontally to suggest a seascape or landscape into the boundaries of a body in order to imply a microcosmic world, while reversing the traditional formula of a body in a landscape. By multiplying the concept across fifteen foal-sized sculptures, he also created a landscape of repeated forms, to somehow close the circle.

The artist embodies ideas of space, time and nature with the horse sculptures that have recurred throughout his work over the time. Each object suggests a compound of the four elements – water, air, earth (connoted by the body of the horse), and fire, crystallised in the substance of the fired glass.

And finally, at the back of the gallery in a smaller room we could see the conjunction of see and sky in a big canvas, in which the sun is depicted beyond a horizontal line. As an echo of previous works he combined horizontal lines and suns of concentric circles. Rondinone’s framed it as a mental space that I dared to enter for the sake of the pictures below. I do hope that you enjoy the artworks and my interaction with them!


Horizontes contenidos
Ugo Rondinone
un cielo. un mar . montañas distantes. caballos . primavera .
12 de abril – 22 de mayo de 2021
Sadie Coles, Londres, Reino Unido

La última exposición de arte que vi que conectó conmigo fue la de Ugo Rondinone en Sadie Coles esta primavera. Sé que han pasado más de dos meses desde que la vi, pero espero que encuentres sus obras de arte tan visual y conceptualmente interesantes como yo.

Ugo Rondinone (nacido en 1964) es un artista de técnica mixta nacido en Suiza que vive en Nueva York. Estudió en la Hochschule für Angewandte Kunst de Viena (1986-90), y ha expuesto ampliamente a escala internacional. Es particularmente conocido por sus esculturas de ‘land art’ temporales y a gran escala como ‘Seven Magic Mountains’ (2016-2021), formada con siete tótems de piedras grandes del tamaño de un automóvil pintadas con colores fluor y apiladas a 32 pies (9,8 m) de altura.

Para la exposición de arte que cubro aquí, mostró una nueva versión de ‘Seven Magic Mountains’ en Davies Street (una de las galerías de Sadie Coles), pero en dos dimensiones. Cada lienzo de puntas redondas representa una roca pintada y apilada encima de la otra; todas dispuestas verticalmente como puedes ver a continuación.

Me gustó la reinvención del tótem con estas pinturas, pero las obras de arte que más me gustaron en esta muestra fueron las que se exhibieron en Kingly Street (galería principal de Sadie Coles HQ), donde Rondinone presentó quince caballos moldeados en vidrio azul. Cada escultura era un poco más pequeña que el tamaño real de un caballo y estaba formada por dos tonos distintos de azul transparente. Se podía apreciar cómo se habían dividido horizontalmente para sugerir un paisaje marino en los límites de un cuerpo con el fin de implicar un mundo microcósmico, mientras se invierte la fórmula tradicional de un cuerpo en un paisaje. Al multiplicar el concepto en quince esculturas del tamaño de un potrillo, también crea un paisaje de formas repetidas, para cerrar de alguna manera el círculo.

El artista encarna las ideas del espacio, el tiempo y la naturaleza con las esculturas de caballos que se han repetido a lo largo de su obra durante décadas. Cada objeto sugiere un compuesto de los cuatro elementos: agua, aire, tierra (connotada por el cuerpo del caballo) y fuego, cristalizados en la sustancia del vidrio cocido.

Y finalmente, al fondo de la galería en una sala más pequeña pudimos ver la conjunción de mar y cielo en un gran lienzo, en el que se representa al sol más allá de una línea horizontal. Como eco de trabajos anteriores combinó líneas horizontales y soles de círculos concéntricos. Rondinone lo enmarcó como un espacio mental en el que me atreví a entrar para tomar las imágenes que te muestro a continuación. ¡Espero que disfrutes de las obras de arte y de mi interacción con las mismas!

Photos taken at Davies Street (Sadie Coles) below.

Photos taken at Kingly Street (Sadie Coles) below.

In search of infinity

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Fly in league with the night
18 November 2020 – 31 May 2021
Tate Britain, London, UK.

I was pleased to go to this art exhibition soon after it opened at Tate. Mainly because after Christmas the UK went in lockdown for COVID-19 and all art galleries closed. But, you are still in time to visit it if you’re in London because Tate Britain is now open and this show is on until the 31st May.

The artist is Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, a British painter and writer born in London in 1977 to Ghanaian parents, and one of the most aclaimed painters working today. Not surprisingly, as she’s had many years of academic training. She learned to paint from life and changed her approach to painting at an early stage, while studying at Falmouth School of Art, on the Cornish coast. Yiadom-Boakye realised she was less interested in making portraits of people and more in the act of painting itself.

Yiadom-Boakye paints black people, in the most traditional European art form: oil painting on canvas. The painters she admires include: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. And her high level of execution has led her to win prizes such as the prestigious Carnegie Prize in 2018, and to be shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye is well-know for her enigmatic portraits of fictitious people, who live in private worlds. Both familiar and mysterious, they invite viewers to project their own interpretations, and raise important questions of identity and representation. She mentioned in an interview recently that she keeps coming back to the idea of “infinity”.

She takes inspiration from found images, memories, literature and the history of painting. Each painting is an exploration of a different mood, movement and pose, worked out on the surface of the canvas. I see why the artist says her figures aren’t real people, although her source of inspiration seems to be real people. She likes to place the role of narrative in the viewer, and let our imaginations go free when we encounter her works, and that’s not what happens when you see a portrait of someone.

“I write about the things I can’t paint and paint the things I can’t write about.”
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

A writer of prose and poetry as well as a painter, the artist sees both forms of creativity as separate but intertwined, and gives her paintings poetic titles, which she describes as as ‘an extra brush-mark’. However she doesn’t see the titles as an explanation or description, just a way to release our imagination.

We both of The art berries enjoyed this exhibition. The figures on these paintings command your attention, either because of their gaze or the mysteriousness behind the scenes. They were like part of a dream or an old memory that transcends time. The subdued colours at first sight are in some paintings very vibrant, like the things or elements that appear in your dreams.

The artist uses timeless elements in her search for infinity. The enigmatic subjects and sensuality of most of the artworks on display, and the use of only black people on her paintings make them very contemporary, despite the references for her style are so classic.


En busca del infinito
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Vuela en liga con la noche
18 de noviembre de 2020-9 de mayo de 2021
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido.

Me gustó ir a esta exposición de arte poco después de su inauguración en la Tate. Principalmente porque después de Navidad el Reino Unido quedó cerrado for el COVID-19 y todas las galerías de arte cerraron. Pero aún estás a tiempo de visitarla si estás en Londres porque la Tate Britain ya está abierta y esta exposición no cierra hasta el 31 de mayo.

La artista es Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, una pintora y escritora británica nacida en Londres en 1977 de padres ghaneses, y una de las pintoras más aclamadas en la actualidad. No es de extrañar, ya que ha tenido muchos años de formación académica. Aprendió a pintar en vivo y cambió su enfoque de la pintura en una etapa temprana, mientras estudiaba en Falmouth School of Art, en la costa de Cornualles. Yiadom-Boakye se dio cuenta de que estaba menos interesada en hacer retratos de personas y más en el acto de pintar en sí.

Yiadom-Boakye pinta personas de raza negra, en la técnica de pintura europea más tradicional: pintura al óleo sobre lienzo. Los pintores que admira son: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. Y su alto grado de ejecución la ha llevado a ganar premios como el prestigioso Carnegie Prize en 2018, y a ser preseleccionada para el Turner Prize en 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye es conocida por sus enigmáticos retratos de personas ficticias que viven en mundos privados. Tanto familiares como misteriosos, invitan a los espectadores a proyectar sus propias interpretaciones y plantean importantes cuestiones de identidad y representación. Recientemente, mencionó en una entrevista que continua volviendo a la idea de “infinito”.

Se inspira en imágenes encontradas, recuerdos, literatura e historia de la pintura. Cada pintura es una exploración de un estado de ánimo, movimiento y pose diferente, elaborado en la superficie del lienzo. Entiendo por qué la artista dice que sus figuras no son personas reales, aunque parezca que su fuente de inspiración son personas de carne y hueso. Le gusta colocar el papel de la narrativa en el espectador y dejar que nuestra imaginación se libere cuando nos encontramos con sus obras, y eso no es lo que sucede cuando ves un retrato de alguien.

“Escribo sobre las cosas que no puedo pintar y pinto las cosas sobre las que no puedo escribir”.
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Escritora de prosa y poesía, además de pintora, la artista ve ambas formas de creatividad como separadas pero entrelazadas, y le da a sus pinturas títulos poéticos, que describe como “una marca de pincel adicional”. Sin embargo, ella no ve los títulos como una explicación o descripción, solo una forma de liberar nuestra imaginación.

Las dos integrantes de The art berries disfrutamos bastante de esta exposición. Las figuras de estas pinturas llaman tu atención, bien sea por cómo te miran o por el misterio detrás de cada escena. Son como parte de un sueño o un viejo recuerdo que trasciende el tiempo. Los colores tenues a primera vista son en algunas pinturas muy vibrantes, como las cosas o elementos que aparecen en los sueños.

La artista utiliza elementos atemporales en su búsqueda del infinito. Lo cual combinado con el misterio y la sensualidad de la mayoría de las obras de arte expuestas, y el uso únicamente de personas de raza negra en sus pinturas las hacen muy contemporáneas, a pesar de que las referencias de su estilo sean tan clásicas.

The art of resilience in life

María Berrío
Flowered Songs and Broken Currents
6 October – 18 December 2020
Victoria Miro gallery, London, UK

This is an art exhibition I saw at Victoria Miro gallery and is still available to view on Vortic Collect until 18 December 2020. As I came in, the upper galleries were filled with light and colour coming from the artworks created by María Berrío, a Colombian artist based in Brooklyn, NYC. Her works are mostly made with Japanese print paper and reflect on cross-cultural connections and global migration seen through the prism of her own history.

Latin American folklore may come to your mind when you see the colour brightness of these artworks, as well as an uneasy feeling because of the gaze and loneliness of the women represented. In 2019 the artist started researching small fishing villages in Colombia – the country where she was born and raised- and became intrigued by the stories of these villages and their inhabitants. These stories inspired her to imagine her own fishing village in the language of magical realism, a style of fiction that paints a realistic view of the modern world while also adding magical elements. Berrío created this series of artworks to explore the modes of resilience and adaptation that arise out of loss. They depict the women and children that are left behind.

A sense of loss can be perceived out of these artworks, but also a sense of rebirth. For instance, one of my favourite works in this show is ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020, showing a woman about four months pregnant, sitting lonely in a big classical armchair . On one side of the armchair there is a plant and flowers on the window, symbols of rebirth. The sky is blue outside. Children are still being born; there is still hope for the human race. See photos of the artworks below.

Another work from Berrío ‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020, was a bit worrying at first sight. “This nods to our attempts to categorise and frame events, to contain them in a way that enables us to understand them”, says the artist. The two birds in this artwork represent the past and the present. “She grabs the present in her hand, but her past remains beside her, impossible to leave behind.”

My favourite artwork in this art show has no figure on it though. It depicts only a tree ‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020. According to the artist “The beauty and glory of nature is figure enough…By distancing ourselves mentally, technologically, and materially from nature, we not only fail to see nature’s wonder but also our own place in that wonder. We react in shock and horror to discover that we, too, are but one fragment of something far grander than our laughter and sadness. This tree, like all trees – as well as all birds, mountains, stars, and people – will live, die, and be reborn again.” I chose to interact with this artwork because I love trees; they are a symbol of life for me.

I really like the artist’s cyclical perception of the universe, and the way in which she focuses on female strength. This show is like a homage to Latin American women for the endurance and strength they demonstrate on a daily basis. How they are able to overcome all kind of political and sociological events such as migration, poverty and loss and reinvent themselves again.


El arte de la fortaleza humana
María Berrío
Flowered Songs and Broken Currents
6 de octubre – 18 de diciembre de 2020
Galería Victoria Miro, Londres, Reino Unido

Esta es una exposición de arte que ví en la galería Victoria Miro y todavía está disponible para ver en Vortic Collect hasta el 18 de diciembre del 2020. Al entrar, las galerías superiores estaban llenas de luz y color procedente de las obras de arte creadas por María Berrío, artista colombiana ubicada en Brooklyn, Nueva York. Sus obras están hechas en su mayoría con papel japonés y reflejan las conexiones interculturales y la migración global vistas a través del prisma de su propia historia.

El folklore latinoamericano puede venir a tu mente cuando ves la abundancia de colores de estas obras de arte, así como un sentimiento de inquietud por la mirada de soledad de las mujeres representadas. En 2019, la artista comenzó a investigar pequeños pueblos de pescadores en Colombia -el país donde nació y se crió- y se sintió intrigada por las historias de estos pueblos y sus habitantes. Estas historias la inspiraron a imaginar su propio pueblo de pescadores impregnado del lenguaje del realismo mágico, un estilo de ficción que pinta una visión realista del mundo y al mismo tiempo agrega elementos mágicos. Berrío creó esta serie de obras de arte para explorar los modos de resistencia humana y adaptación que surgen de la pérdida. Representan a las mujeres y los niños que se quedan atrás.

Se puede percibir una sensación de pérdida en estas obras de arte, pero también una sensación de renacimiento. Por ejemplo, una de mis obras favoritas es ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020, que muestra a una mujer embarazada de unos cuatro meses, sentada sola en un gran sofa de diseño clásico. A un lado del sillón hay una planta y flores en la ventana, símbolos de renacimiento. Fuera el cielo es azul. Todavía están naciendo niños; todavía hay esperanza para la raza humana. Puedes ver las fotos de las obras de arte más abajo.

Otro trabajo de Berrío ‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020, me pareció un poco inquietante a primera vista. “Esto hace referencia a nuestros intentos de categorizar y enmarcar los eventos, de contenerlos de una manera que nos permita comprenderlos”, dice la artista. Los dos pájaros de esta obra de arte representan el pasado y el presente. “Agarra el presente en su mano, pero su pasado permanece a su lado, imposible de dejar atrás”.

Sin embargo, mi obra preferida en esta muestra no tiene figura. Representa sólo un árbol ‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020. Según la artista “La belleza y la gloria de la naturaleza es figura suficiente … Al distanciarnos mental, tecnológica y materialmente de la naturaleza, no solo dejamos de ver la maravilla de la naturaleza, sino también nuestro propio lugar en esa maravilla. Reaccionamos conmocionados y horrorizados al descubrir que también nosotros somos un fragmento de algo mucho más grandioso que nuestra risa y tristeza. Este árbol, como todos los árboles, así como todos los pájaros, montañas, estrellas y personas, vivirán, morirán y renacerán de nuevo “. Elegí interactuar con esta obra de arte porque me encantan los árboles; son un símbolo de vida para mí.

Me gusta mucho la percepción cíclica del universo que tiene la artista y la forma en que se enfoca en la fortaleza femenina. Esta muestra es como un homenaje a las mujeres latinoamericanas por la resistencia y la fuerza que muestran en el día a día. Cómo son capaces de superar todo tipo de eventos políticos y sociológicos como la migración, la pobreza y la pérdida, y son capaces de reinventarse de nuevo.

María Berrío, ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020
María Berrío, ‘Clouded Infinity’, (Detail) 2020
María Berrío,‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020
María Berrío,‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020
María Berrío,‘Under a Cold Sun’, 2020
María Berrío, ‘Crowned Solitudes’, 2020

Changing perceptions

Olafur Eliasson
In real life
11 July 2019 – 5 January 2020
Tate Modern, London, UK

This was a very popular art exhibition at the Tate Modern in London last summer and autumn and, although I couldn’t find the time to write about it while it was on, I believe that Olafur Eliasson is one of the best artists working nowadays, so I wouldn’t like to miss it here.

As we went into the exhibition space, the first room we entered was a model room. In dim light, he presented around 450 models, prototypes and geometric studies behind a glass. All of them are a record of his work with a studio team and with Icelandic artist, mathematician and architect Einar Thorsteinn (1942-2015). Some of these shapes can be recognised on Eliasson’s sculptures and pavilions. I was mesmerised by the different shapes, textures and materials employed by the artist here. Among the materias on display were paper, wood, rubber balls, Lego and wire. I would’ve liked to shrink and immerse myself in this magical landscape! See a small view of the models below.

The following room displayed his earliest works. Here, it can be appreciated the interest of the artist in nature and the weather. My favourite piece in this room was “Moss wall” (1994), a huge abstract work made of Scandinavian reindeer lichen that served to bring an unexpected material from nature into the space of the gallery. The texture and colour of this work captivated me and kept me staring at it for some time; there was so much detail to appreciate from it! It was like going back to nature, but within a sheltered space.

Then, we could see the use the artist does of kaleidoscopes, which he’s been making since the mid-1990s. For Eliasson this is not just a playful toy, but also as a way to reconfigure what you see. He merges inside and outside space and dissolves the boundary between the gallery and the outside world. The art blackberry can be seen in a worship position underneath one of them.

As we continued watching the art exhibition, we came across his glacial works. Visiting Iceland in his childhood made the artist very close to the global warming plight after seeing its glaciers melt in first hand. He documented this with a series of photographs he started taking in 1999 and finished in 2019, twenty years later. The changes in the landscape can be clearly appreciated.

In addition, there were other references to the changing environment like in “Glacial currents” (2018), where pieces of glacial ice were placed on top of washes of colour pigment (see image below) or in a bronze cast from 2019 called “The presence of absence pavilion”, which makes visible the empty space left by a glacial ice chunk after melting away. An Australian friend collaborate with us as a Guest berry in these photos and her hand can be seen through this artwork below.

Finally, another one of Eliasson’s projects around this subject was “Ice Watch”, staged in front of Tate Modern in 2018 and consisting of ice blocks brought from Greenland to offer a direct experience of seeing the ice from the Artic melt. The ice was fished out of a fjord in Greenland after becoming detached from the ice sheet. As a result of global warming more icebergs are produced causing the sea levels to rise.

Olafur Eliasson is a Danish-Icelendic artist, whose body of work includes sculptures, large-scale installations, photography and paintings. He uses all sort of materials ranging from moss, glacial melt-water, light, fog and even air temperature to enhance the viewer’s experience. His main interests revolve around nature, geometry and his ongoing investigations into how we perceive, feel and shape the world around us. Hence, the audiences experience at his art shows are so much at the centre of attention of his art.

Ultimately, he believes that art can have a strong impact on the world outside the museum, and I personally agree with this view. In fact, Eliasson runs a studio in Berlin with technicians, architects, archivists, art historians, designers, filmmakers, cooks, and administrators, and he collaborates with all sort of professionals to work in matters such as sustainable energy or climate change. As an artist he’s got a strong will to change perceptions towards the environment and to achieve a more sustainable planet, and if more people had the same concerns, the world would be a better place to live in.


 

Cambiando percepciones

Olafur Eliasson
En la vida real
11 de julio de 2019 – 5 de enero de 2020
Tate Modern, Londres, Reino Unido.

Esta fue una exposición de arte muy popular en la Tate Modern de Londres el verano y otoño pasados y, aunque no encontré tiempo para escribir sobre ella mientras estaba abierta, creo que Olafur Eliasson es uno de los mejores artistas trabajando hoy día, así que no quiero dejar de cubrirla aquí.

Cuando entramos en la exposición, la primera sala con la que nos topamos fue una sala de maquetas. Con poca luz, se presentaban alrededor de 450 maquetas, prototipos y estudios geométricos detrás de un vidrio. Todas ellas son un registro de su trabajo con un equipo de su estudio y con el artista, matemático y arquitecto islandés Einar Thorsteinn (1942-2015). Algunas de estas formas se pueden reconocer en las esculturas e instalaciones de Eliasson. Me quedé fascinada con las diferentes formas, texturas y materiales empleados por el artista. Entre los materiales había papel, madera, bolas de goma, Lego y alambre. Me hubiera gustado encogerme para sumergirme en este paisaje mágico! Puedes ver una pequeña imagen de las maquetas debajo.

La siguiente sala exhibió sus primeros trabajos. Aquí, se reflejaba el interés del artista en la naturaleza y el clima. Mi pieza favorita en esta sala fue “Moss wall” (1994), una gran obra abstracta hecha de liquen de reno escandinavo que sirvió para llevar un material inesperado de la naturaleza al espacio de la galería. La textura y el color de este trabajo me cautivaron y me mantuvieron mirándolo por algún tiempo; ¡había tantos detalles que apreciar! Era como volver a la naturaleza, pero dentro de un espacio protegido.

Más adelante pudimos ver el uso que el artista hace de los caleidoscopios, que ha estado haciendo desde mediados de la década de 1990. Para Eliasson, este no es solo un juguete lúdico, sino también una forma de reconfigurar lo que ves. Fusiona el espacio interior y exterior y disuelve el límite entre la galería y el mundo exterior. The art blackberry se puede ver en una posición de adoración debajo de uno de ellos a continuación.

A medida que avanzamos por la exposición de arte, nos encontramos con sus obras glaciales. Visitar Islandia en su infancia hizo que el artista se acercara mucho a la difícil situación del calentamiento global después de ver cómo se derritieron sus glaciares de primera mano. Lo documentó con una serie de fotografías que comenzó a tomar en 1999 y terminó en 2019, veinte años después. Los cambios en el paisaje se pueden apreciar claramente.

Además, hubo otras referencias al entorno cambiante como en “Corrientes glaciales” (2018), donde se colocaron trozos de hielo glacial sobre lavados de pigmento de color (ver imagen a continuación) o en un molde de bronce de 2019 llamado “The presencia del pabellón de ausencia ”, que hace visible el espacio vacío dejado por un trozo de hielo glacial después de derretirse. Una amiga australiana visitando Londres colabora con nosotras como Guest berry y puede verse su mano  a través de esta obra abajo.

Finalmente, otro de los proyectos de Eliasson en torno a este tema fue “Ice Watch”, organizado frente a Tate Modern en 2018 y consistente en bloques de hielo traídos de Groenlandia para ofrecer una experiencia directa de ver el deshielo del Artico. El hielo fue sacado de un fiordo en Groenlandia después de separarse de la capa de hielo. Como resultado del calentamiento global, se producen más icebergs que provocan el aumento del nivel del mar.

Olafur Eliasson es un artista danés-islandés, cuyo trabajo incluye esculturas, instalaciones a gran escala, fotografía y pinturas. Utiliza todo tipo de materiales, desde musgo, agua de deshielo glacial, luz, niebla e incluso temperatura del aire para mejorar la experiencia del espectador. Sus principales intereses giran en torno a la naturaleza, la geometría y sus continuas investigaciones sobre cómo percibimos, sentimos y damos forma al mundo que nos rodea. Por lo tanto, la experiencia del público en sus exposiciones de arte está en el centro de atención de su arte.

Finalmente, él cree que el arte puede tener un fuerte impacto en el mundo fuera del museo, y personalmente estoy de acuerdo con esta opinión. De hecho, Eliasson dirige un estudio en Berlín con técnicos, arquitectos, archiveros, historiadores del arte, diseñadores, cineastas, cocineros y administradores, y colabora con todo tipo de profesionales para trabajar en asuntos como la energía sostenible o el cambio climático. Como artista, tiene una gran voluntad de cambiar las percepciones sobre el medio ambiente y lograr un planeta más sostenible, y si más personas tuvieran las mismas preocupaciones, el mundo sería un lugar mejor para vivir.

Eliasson_Theartberries_room1Eliasson_Theartberries_KalEliasson_Theartberries_colourpicEliasson_Theartberries_GlacialCurrentsEliasson_Theartberries_Hand2Eliasson_Theartberries_Hand1

Retelling stories through found objects

Rayyane Tabet
Encounters
24 September – 14 December 2019
Parasol Unit foundation for contemporary art, London, UK
Free entry

The current art show at Parasol Unit that finishes this week is by Beirut-born and based artist Rayyane Tabet, who presents here 8 works from the past 13 years, installed together for the first time. I didn’t know this artist previously, but I was pleasantly surprised by his work. The minimalist quality of his artworks comes along with historial and cultural references to his birthplace of Lebanon that he combines sometimes with personal stories.

The artist appears to be interested in communicating an alternative view of the main political and economic events that have taken place in his country in recent years. Not only that, with his artwork he wants to contribute to the outside world’s understanding of this complex place.

All of the above, helps the visitor to connect better with his work. Tabet takes inspiration from overlooked objects that he wraps with personal anecdotes and supranational histories. According to Tabet, how Lebanon is perceived by the outside world and even by Lebaneses has no common version in history textbooks. Children in different communities are taught different versions of history.

“I’m interested in the question of whether we could create a history told by objects and materials. A lot of the time those last longer than people and are able to overcome moments of violence and marginalisation in a way that people cannot.” the artist says. 

On the ground floor, at the back of the gallery The art berries found a big red star hanging from the ceiling together with a red horse among other objects. We liked the star for some art interaction. See some photos below.

Another artwork very relevant in the show is a couple of oars of a rowing boat. The artist’s father was going to use that boat to escape their home country for Cyprus. The operation was aborted and long after that attempt of fleeting the family re-encounter the same boat by accident. The artist purchased it and decided to use as one of his artworks.

And finally, our favourite artwork on this exhibition was “Steel Rings” (2013–), a sequence of 28 rolled-steel rings arranged in a line. We liked this work for its minimalist simplicity and because it was a good art piece to interact with. Not particularly novel at first sight. But, when you pay a closer look at it and read about why the artist has chosen to display this work, you’ll be much more intrigued. Each of these rings is engraved with a distance and location in longitude and latitude, marking a specific place along the now defund Trans-Arabian Pipeline (TAPline). Built in 1947 by an alliance of US oil companies, and once the world’s largest long-distance oil pipeline, is still the only physical structure that crosses the borders of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Syria, the Golan, and Lebanon. When the American TAPline company finally closed down after decades of regional conflict, they abandoned the pipeline in situ.

The rings can be seen as a witness to that period of history. Tapline did not survive the first Gulf War (1990–91), at the onset of which it was abandoned as a result of Saudi Arabia’s opposition to Jordan’s support of Iraq. Although largely untold, this story remains part of popular consciousness and memory, and I believe that Tabet brings up the subject elegantly and skillfully inside the gallery.


 

Volver a contar historias a través de objetos encontrados

Rayyane Tabet
Encuentros
24 de septiembre – 14 de diciembre de 2019
Parasol Unit, Londres, Reino Unido.
Entrada libre

La exposición de arte que hay ahora en Parasol Unit y que termina esta semana es de Rayyane Tabet, un artista nacido y ubicado en Beirut que presenta aquí 8 obras de los últimos 13 años, instaladas juntas por primera vez. No conocía a este artista anteriormente, pero su trabajo me sorprendió gratamente. La calidad minimalista de sus obras de arte se acompaña de referencias históricas y culturales a su lugar de nacimiento del Líbano que a veces combina con historias personales.

El artista parece estar interesado en comunicar una visión alternativa de los principales acontecimientos políticos y económicos que han tenido lugar en su país en los últimos años. No solo eso, con sus obras de arte quiere contribuir a la comprensión externa de este complejo lugar. 

Todo lo anterior, ayuda al visitante a conectar mejor con su trabajo. Tabet se inspira en objetos pasados ​​por alto, que envuelve en anécdotas personales e historias supranacionales. Según Tabet, cómo el Líbano es percibido por el mundo exterior e incluso por los libaneses no tiene una versión común en los libros de texto de historia. A los niños de diferentes comunidades se les enseñan diferentes versiones de la historia.

“Me interesa la cuestión de si podríamos crear una historia contada por objetos y materiales. Muchas veces duran más que las personas y son capaces de superar los momentos de violencia y marginación de una manera que la gente no puede “, dice el artista. 

En la parte posterior de la planta baja de la galería, The art berries encontramos una gran estrella roja colgando del techo junto con un caballo rojo entre otros objetos. Nos gustó la estrella para interactuar y tomar alguna foto. Podrás ver algunas fotos a continuación.

Otra obra de arte muy relevante en la exposición es un par de remos de un bote. El padre del artista iba a usar ese bote para escapar de su país de origen hacia Chipre. La operación fue abortada y mucho después de ese intento de huir de la familia se reencontró con el mismo bote  por accidente. El artista lo compró y decidió usarlo como una de sus obras de arte.

Y finalmente, nuestra obra de arte favorita en esta exposición fue Steel Rings (2013–), una secuencia de 28 anillos de acero laminado dispuestos en una línea. Nos gusto esta obra estéticamente por su simplicidad minimalista y como pieza de arte con la cual interactuar. No es particularmente novedosa a primera vista. Sin embargo, cuando echas un vistazo más de cerca y lees sobre por qué el artista ha elegido mostrar este trabajo, estarás mucho más intrigado. Cada uno de estos anillos está grabado con una distancia y ubicación en longitud y latitud, marcando un lugar específico a lo largo de la tubería Trans-Arabian (TAPline). Construido en 1947 por una alianza de compañías petroleras estadounidenses, y que una vez fue el oleoducto de larga distancia más grande del mundo, sigue siendo la única estructura física que cruza las fronteras de Arabia Saudita, Jordania, Siria, el Golán y el Líbano. Cuando la compañía estadounidense TAPline finalmente cerró después de décadas de conflicto regional, abandonaron la tubería in situ.

Los anillos pueden ser vistos como testigos de ese período de la historia. TAPline no sobrevivió a la primera Guerra del Golfo (1990-1991), al comienzo de la cual fue abandonada como resultado de la oposición de Arabia Saudita al apoyo de Jordania a Irak. Aunque en gran parte no contada, esta historia sigue siendo parte de la conciencia y la memoria popular, y creo que Tabet emplea este tema con elegancia y habilidad dentro de la galería.

Rayyane Tabet_TAB_starRayyane Tabet_TAB_rings2

Exploring space with sculpture

Phyllida Barlow
cul-de-sac
23 February – 23 June 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

After nearly two months without posting anything here, I’m finally back! I have a good excuse for being so quiet since January. My son Samuel was born on the 9th February and I have been really busy and enjoying his company since then.

Nevertheless, there’s a good art show now in London that I wanted to share with you. British sculptor Phyllida Barlow has currently an art exhibition at the contemporary galleries of the Royal Academy of Arts, which will be on until the end of the spring. The art berries went to visit it and I’m sharing it with you here, so you don’t miss one of the best art shows in London this season.

The photos you can see from The art berries below have been taken as usual with an iPhone. We’ve interacted with the artworks and bring you an intimate and personal approach of the art pieces we found more interesting.

As we entered the gallery space, we came across two huge sculptures. One of them is a vertical structure formed by various colourful canvases. A playful and intriguing art piece that traps your attention from the very beginning of the exhibition. From the photos below, you can see The art blackberry next to this piece. She appears to be in conversation with a colourful group of individuals.

As we moved along the art show, a new interesting sculpture is revealed. It reminds me of an amphitheatre with a semicircular seating gallery space sustained by multiple beams that go in different directions. You can see how we blend with the sculpture and contribute to this perception.

Finally, a series of pictures are presented below with The art blackberry amid a forest of inclined beams. In this pictures, her fragility is accentuated by the the menacing beams above her.

In February, Barlow created this exhibition that brings her own interpretation of a residential cul-de-sac. By closing the exit door in the final room, Barlow forced the viewer to turn around and revisit each sculpture anew from the other side. She created forests of seemingly precarious structures and uses them to explore the full height of the gallery space with looming beams, blocks and canvases.

Thresholds, the artist has said, are fascinating places, where you pass through from one space to another. Always seeking the surprise, Barlow expects the work to take her into a  journey, rather than her deciding upon that journey.

Her source of inspiration is in the everyday from a farm to an industrial state. Because of that, Barlow uses everyday materials such as plywood, expanding foam, polystyrene, plaster, cement, plastic piping, Polyfilla, tape, etc. and remind us to look at them in a new context with a new light. They are so common in our world that we’ve stopped even seeing them.

Barlow studied at Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) and the Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). She later taught at both schools and was Professor of Fine Art and Director of Undergraduate Studies at the latter until 2009.


Explorando el espacio con escultura

Phyllida Barlow
Callejón sin salida
23 de febrero – 23 de junio de 2019
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

Después de casi dos meses sin publicar nada aquí, ¡por fin estoy de vuelta! Tengo una buena excusa para estar tan callada desde enero. Mi hijo Samuel nació el 9 de febrero y he estado muy liada y disfrutando de su compañía desde entonces.

De cualquier manera, hay una buena exposición de arte ahora en Londres que quería compartir contigo. La escultora británica Phyllida Barlow tiene desde febrero una exposición en las galerías contemporáneas de la Royal Academy of Arts, que estará abierta hasta el final de la primavera. The art berries fuimos a visitarla y la comparto aquí contigo para que no te pierdas una de las mejores muestras de arte en Londres esta temporada.

Las fotos que puedes ver a continuación en The art berries  se han tomado como siempre con un iPhone. Hemos interactuado con las obras de arte y te brindamos un enfoque intimo y personal de las piezas que encontramos más interesantes.

Cuando entramos en el espacio de la galería, nos encontramos con dos esculturas enormes. Una de ellas es una estructura vertical formada por varios lienzos de colores. Una escultura divertida e intrigante que capta tu atención desde el principio de la exposición. En las fotos que capturamos debajo, puedes ver a The art blackberry junto a esta pieza. Parece estar en conversación con un grupo colorido de individuos.

 

A medida que avanzamos en la muestra de arte, aparece una nueva e interesante escultura. Me recuerda a un anfiteatro con un espacio semicircular en la galería de asientos sostenido por múltiples vigas que van en distintas direcciones. Puedes ver como nos mezclamos con la escultura y contribuimos a esta percepción.

Finalmente, a continuación se puede ver una serie de imágenes con The art blackberry en medio de un bosque de vigas inclinadas. En estas imágenes, su fragilidad se ve acentuada por las vigas que hay sobre ella.

En febrero, Barlow creó esta exposición que trae su propia interpretación de un callejón sin salida residencial. Al cerrar la puerta de salida en la sala final, Barlow obligó al espectador a darse la vuelta y volver a visitar cada escultura desde el otro lado. Creó bosques de estructuras aparentemente precarias y las utiliza para explorar la altura completa del espacio de la galería con vigas, bloques y lienzos que parece que se van a caer de un moment a otro.

Los umbrales, ha dicho la artista, son lugares fascinantes, donde se pasa de un espacio a otro. Siempre buscando la sorpresa, Barlow espera que el trabajo la lleve a un viaje, en lugar de que ella decida sobre ese viaje.

Su fuente de inspiración está en lo cotidiano, desde una granja hasta un estado industrial. Debido a eso, Barlow utiliza materiales cotidianos como madera contrachapada, espuma expandida, poliestireno, yeso, cemento, tuberías de plástico, Polyfilla, cinta, etc. y nos recuerdan mirarlos en un nuevo contexto, con una nueva luz. Son tan comunes en nuestro mundo que hemos dejado de verlos.

Barlow estudió en el Chelsea College of Art (1960 – 1963) y en la Slade School of Art (1963 – 1966). Más tarde enseñó en ambas escuelas y fue profesora de Bellas Artes y Directora de Estudios de Pre-grado en esta última hasta el 2009.

PB_The art berries_colour blocks2PB_The art berries_colour blocks1PB-The art berries_amphitheatrePB_The art berries_small sculpturePB_The art berries_black1PB_The art berries_black3PB_The art berries_black4PB_The art berries_black2

Intricate pretty art pieces

Anni Albers
11 October 2018 – 27 January 2019
Tate Modern, London, UK

We were at Tate Modern last week visiting the art exhibition of Anni Albers (1899-1994), an artist who combined the art of hand-weaving with the language of modern art and what I believe is one the best art shows in London at the moment. Do not miss it, because it’s finishing soon.

Featuring over 350 objects from small-scale pieces and studies to large wall-hangings, jewellery and textiles designed for mass production, the show explores the intersection between art and craft, hand-weaving and machine production, ancient and modern art. It opened ahead of the centenary of the Bauhaus in 2019 and recognises Albers contribution to modern art and design.

I believe that the hand-weaving pieces presented at the art show are really diverse in shape, colour and size. It seems to me that she kept experimenting with design, techniques and materials all her life, yet keeping a very personal style.

Each artwork is like a little treasure made with great care and deep thinking. For instance, she turned everyday objects into precious jewellery pieces, and explored the use of many textures and materials for different and interesting results.

I liked the large wall-hangings with abstract patterns as well as the small-scale pieces that show a great attention to detail. In addition, there’s a central big room in the exhibition that displays various wall-hangings similar to blinds of Japanese inspiration that we decided to use for our photos, as they are good to reflect about the contemporary art space and the interaction of the body within that space.

Born in Berlin at the turn of the century, Annelise Else Frieda Fleischmann became a student at the Bauhaus in 1922, where she met her husband Josef Albers and other key modernist figures like Paul Klee.

The Bauhaus was a German art school that was opened from 1919 to 1933 and had a profound influence upon subsequent developments in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design and typography. Although, the Bauhaus aspired to gender equality, women were still discouraged from learning certain disciplines including painting. Anni Albers began weaving by default, but it was in textiles that she found her means of expression, dedicating herself to the medium for the majority of her career. 

With the rise of Nazism and the closure of the Bauhaus, Albers left Germany in 1933 for the USA where she taught at the experimental Black Mountain College for over 15 years. She made frequent visits to Mexico, Chile and Peru, where she bought an extensive collection of ancient Pre-Columbian textiles.  In both her work and her writing, she presents a vastly expanded geography of modern art, drawing on sources from Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Visiting the show was a very stimulating experience and I feeI that it would be so for those of you who like modern art, crafts and design as much as I do.


Piezas de arte intrincadas y bonitas

Anni Albers
11 de octubre de 2018 – 27 de enero de 2019
Tate Modern, Londres, Reino Unido

Estuvimos en Tate Modern la semana pasada visitando la exposición de arte de Anni Albers (1899-1994), una artista que combinó el arte del tejido a mano con el lenguaje del arte moderno y la que en mi opinión es una de los mejores muestras de arte que hay ahora en Londres. No te lo pierdas, porque termina pronto.

Con más de 350 objetos, desde piezas a pequeña escala y estudios hasta grandes tapices, joyas y textiles diseñados para la producción en masa, la muestra explora la intersección entre arte y artesanía, tejido a mano y producción de maquinaria, arte antiguo y moderno. Se inauguró antes del centenario de la Bauhaus en 2019 y reconoce la contribución de Anni Albers al arte y diseño modernos.

Creo que las piezas de tejido a mano presentadas en la muestra de arte son muy diversas en forma, color y tamaño. Me parece que Albers siguió experimentando con el diseño, las técnicas y los materiales durante toda su vida, pero manteniendo un estilo muy personal.

Cada obra de arte es como un pequeño tesoro hecho con gran cuidado y pensamiento profundo. Por ejemplo, convirtió objetos cotidianos en preciosas piezas de joyería, y exploró el uso de muchas texturas y materiales para obtener resultados diferentes e interesantes.

 

Me gustaron los obras mas grandes con diseños abstractos, así como las piezas a pequeña escala que muestran una gran atención al detalle. Además, hay una gran sala central en la exposición que muestra varias obras similares a estores o cortinas de inspiración japonesa que decidimos usar para algunas de nuestras fotos, ya que nos parecieron buenas para reflexionar sobre el espacio contemporáneo y la interacción del cuerpo dentro de ese espacio.

Nacida en Berlín a principios de siglo, Annelise Else Frieda Fleischmann se convirtió en estudiante de la Bauhaus en 1922, donde conoció a su esposo Josef Albers y otras figuras modernistas clave como Paul Klee.

La Bauhaus fue una escuela de arte alemana que se abrió de 1919 a 1933 y tuvo una profunda influencia en los desarrollos posteriores en arte, arquitectura, diseño gráfico, diseño de interiores, diseño industrial y tipografía. Aunque, la Bauhaus aspiraba a la igualdad de genero, las mujeres fueron desanimadas a aprender ciertas disciplinas, incluida la pintura. Anni Albers comenzó a tejer por defecto, pero fue en los textiles donde encontró su medio de expresión, dedicándose a ello durante la mayor parte de su carrera.

Con el auge del nazismo y el cierre de la Bauhaus, Albers abandonó Alemania en 1933 para ir a los Estados Unidos, donde enseñó en el experimental Black Mountain College durante más de 15 años. Hizo visitas frecuentes a México, Chile y Perú, donde compró una extensa colección de textiles antiguos precolombinos. Tanto en su trabajo como en su escritura, presenta una geografía muy amplia del arte moderno, basándose en fuentes de África, Asia y América.

Visitar la exposición fue una experiencia muy estimulante y creo que lo sería para aquellos de vosotros a los que os guste el arte moderno, la artesanía y el diseño tanto como a mi.

anni albers-the art blueberry backanni albers-the art blackberry standinganni albers-the art blueberry pregnant

anni albers-the art blackberrry lying

 

Challenging South African local histories

Kemang Wa Lehulere
Not even the departed stay grounded
Marian Goodman gallery, London, UK
September 13 – October 20, 2018

We visited this art exhibition a couple of weeks ago at the Marian Goodman gallery in London and it’s now gone. But, nevertheless, I wanted to cover it to introduce you to this artist who is emerging as one of South Africa’s most prominent artistic exports.

As we entered the gallery, I encountered various installations and drawings on the wall made of various materials: wood, metal, chalk, glass and robe; all of them in black and white or the original material. It can be appreciated that the art show has a strong social message, but the artist hasn’t neglected the aesthetical aspects of it. Not only that, he used those aspects to enhance the message, which is something I strongly value. I like art exhibitions with a socio-political message, specially these days in which artists seem to have really strong tools to make us reflect about the society we live in, but I have a preference for the artworks that on top of that are aesthetically interesting.

Kemang Wa Lehulere was born in Cape-town and initially rose to prominence in 2006 with Gugulective, a community-engaged collective co-founded with childhood artistic associate, Unathi Sigenu and based in the former township of Gugulethu, Cape Town. He devoted himself at the time to community engaged performative actions such as creating pamphlets to challenge local histories or setting up interventionist pirate radio stations. Only after years of social activism, he started creating sculptural objects and drawings as a residue or remanent of performance. And he went into formal art education, graduating in 2011.

Drawing on these years of social activism, Wa Lehulere conveys feelings of post-apartheid unrest and other socio-political issues with his artworks, re-enacting what he considers to be ‘deleted scenes’ from South African history.

Some of the elements characteristic of his artistic practice include messages in bottles, sphinx-like ceramic dogs and bird houses that are symbols of the forced removals under apartheid. In addition, there were big boards covered with chalk drawings and various objects suspended by shoelaces from floor to ceiling. However, his most prominent pieces are reconfigured salvaged school desks in wood and metal or just in metal, as we can see on various images below, all of them referring to the 1976 student demonstrations.

Finally, his interest in the Dogon people of Mali and their indigenous astrological knowledge will be reflected in many of the new works, as well as the controversy surrounding his knowledge of the existence of Sirius, a dwarf moon invisible to the naked eye orbiting the Dog Star, despite not having access to astronomical instruments. Kemang used laces to form star constellations, referring not only to the racist repudiation, but also to the repeated negation of opportunities for contemporary young black South Africans.

This art show tells me that art is a powerful tool to express our concerns about the world we live in and not only that, artists like Wa Lehuler manage to do that using a very personal style and effective visual elements.


Desafiando las historias locales de Sudáfrica
Kemang Wa Lehulere
Ni siquiera los difuntos se quedan en tierra.
Galería Marian Goodman, Londres, Reino Unido
13 de septiembre – 20 de octubre de 2018

Visitamos esta exposición de arte hace un par de semanas en la galería Marian Goodman en Londres y ahora ya no está. Pero, he querido cubrirla para presentaros a este artista que se está emergiendo como una de las figuras artísticas más destacadas de Sudáfrica.

Cuando entramos en la galería, encontré varias instalaciones y dibujos en la pared hechos de varios materiales: madera, metal, tiza, vidrio, etc; todos ellos en blanco y negro o en el material original. Se puede apreciar que la muestra de arte tiene un fuerte mensaje social, pero el artista no ha descuidado sus aspectos estéticos. No solo eso, utiliza esos aspectos para ensalzar el mensaje, lo cual valoro ciertamente. Me gustan las muestras de arte con un mensaje socio-político, especialmente en estos días en los que los artistas parecen tener herramientas realmente efectivas para hacernos reflexionar sobre la sociedad en que vivimos, pero tengo preferencia por las obras de arte que, además de eso, son estéticamente interesantes.

Kemang Wa Lehulere nació en Ciudad del Cabo e inicialmente se destacó en 2006 con Gugulective, un colectivo comprometido con la comunidad y cofundado con su socio artístico de la infancia, Unathi Sigenu, y residente en la antigua ciudad de Gugulethu, Ciudad del Cabo. En ese momento se dedicó a hacer demostraciones comprometidas con la comunidad, como crear folletos para desafiar las historias locales o establecer estaciones de radio piratas intervencionistas. Solo después de años de activismo social, comenzó a crear objetos escultóricos y dibujos como un residuo o remanente de su lucha social. Y obtuvo formación artística académica al graduarse en 2011.

Haciendo uso de estos años de activismo social, Wa Lehulere transmite sentimientos de inquietud posterior al apartheid y otros problemas sociopolíticos con sus obras de arte, recreando lo que él considera “escenas borradas” de la historia de Sudáfrica.

Algunos de los elementos característicos de su práctica artística incluyen mensajes en botellas, perros de cerámica con forma de esfinge y casas de aves que simbolizan los retiros forzosos bajo el apartheid. Además, hay tablas grandes cubiertas con dibujos de tiza y varios objetos suspendidos por cordones desde el suelo hasta el techo. Sin embargo, sus piezas más prominentes se reconfiguran como escritorios escolares recuperados en madera y metal o simplemente en metal, como podemos ver en varias imágenes a continuación, todas ellas en referencia a las demostraciones estudiantiles de 1976.

Finalmente, su interés en la gente Dogon de Mali y su conocimiento astrológico indígena se reflejará en muchas de las nuevas obras, así como en la controversia que rodea su conocimiento de la existencia de Sirio, una luna enana invisible a simple vista que orbita alrededor de Dog Star, a pesar de no tener acceso a instrumentos astronómicos. Kemang usó cordones para formar constelaciones de estrellas, refiriéndose no solo al repudio racista, sino también a la negación repetida de oportunidades para los jóvenes sudafricanos negros contemporáneos.

Esta muestra de arte me dice que el arte es una herramienta poderosa para expresar nuestras preocupaciones sobre el mundo en que vivimos, y no solo eso, artistas como Wa Lehuler logran hacerlo usando un estilo muy personal y elementos visuales realmente interesantes y efectivos.

Wa Lehulere - The art blackberryWa lehulere - The art blueberryWa Lehulere - 3 sisters

Breaking moulds in art and in life

Russian Dada 1914–1924
Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
6 June – 22 October 2018

I was pleased to visit this art show a month ago in Madrid, Spain, at the Reina Sofia Museum; the first one I cover out of the UK.

Although the art exhibition felt a bit long because of the number of works on show, about 250, it was really comprehensive and I found it interesting to gain a good perspective of the art created by Russian avant-garde artists during this period, from 1914 to 1924. The show includes paintings, collages, illustrations, sculptures, film projections and publications, and it’s divided in three parts.

Dada or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde that developed in the early 20th century in reaction to World War I and had an early centre in Zurich. The Dada movement rejected the logic, reason and aestheticism of modern capitalist society, expressing irrationality and nonsense protest in their works.

When it comes to Russian Dada, the artworks on show here were produced at the height of Dada’s flourishing, between World War I and the death of Vladimir Lenin, who happened to be a frequent visitor to Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, where this art movement originated. The Russian avant-gardists on show, as well as the rest of Dadaists, supported internationalism and engaged in eccentric practices and pacifist demonstrations.

The first part of the show, and also my favourite, focuses on ‘alogical’ abstraction. As I came into the show I saw photos of some of the Russian Dadaists, in a rather irreverent and playful pose. They were followed by some film projections in black and white, of which I took a snapshot and it’s on show below. One of the sculptures created in this period includes Vladimir Tatlin’s “Complex Corner-Relief” (1915), next to which you can see myself performing for the photo.

TheArtBerries-Tatlin spt

The Art Blueberry performing next to Vladimir Tatlin’s, “Complex Corner-Relief”/”Relieve de esquina complejo” (1915).

One of the hits of this exhibition for me was to see the designs for a stage curtain of the futurist opera “Victory over the Sun” produced by Malevich in 1913 which led him to create his well know “Black Square” in 1915. We cannot see the “Black Square” here, but we can see a design for the curtain for the opera Victory over the Sun and some other variants of it including white squares that are brilliant too.

Kasimir Malevich, “Design for the curtain of the opera Victory over the Sun”/ “Diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol” – left/izq.
The Art Blueberry performing next to Malevich’s work.

Aleksei Morgunov was quoted within the show saying: “In 1914-15 Malevich and I decided that practically all forms of development of the painterly principles that had gone along the trajectory of negation of the created forms, logically brought us to a blank canvas. Our task then to create new forms that have a character of elementary geometric forms. One of such forms was a square.”

Olga Rozanova, “In the Street”/ “En la calle” (1915) – left/izquierda
Aleksei Morgunov, “Composition no. 1″/ “Composición n. 1” – right/derecha.

In collaboration with the musician Mikhail Matyushin and the poet Aleksei Kruchenykh, Malevich did a manifesto calling for the rejection of rational thought. They wanted to change the established systems of Western society. In the opera Victory over the Sun, the characters aimed to abolish reason by capturing the sun and destroying time. Malevich called this Suprematism, and this new movement is all about the supremacy of colour and shape in painting. 

The second section spans the period from 1917 to 1924, from the victory of the Russian Revolution to the death of Vladímir Lenin, touching notions like Internationalism. Malevich’s Suprematism had a strong influence in his contemporaries.  

As such, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaia said on a testimony: “I came to Vitebsk after the October celebrations, but the city still glowed from Malevich’s decorations- of circles, squares, dots, lines of different colours…I felt like I was in a bewitched city, at the time everything was powerful and wonderful.”

We can see Malevich’s influence on Morgunov’s design for the cover of the journal ‘The International of Art’, and on “The New Man” from Litsitzki on show below.

Aleksei Morgunov, Unpublished cover of the journal The International of Art, 1919 / Portada inedita de la revista Internacional de arte – left/izq.
El Lisitzski, “The New Man”/ “El hombre nuevo” (1920-1923) – right/dcha.

The final section explores the connections between Russia and two of the main Dada centres, Paris and Berlin, with works from Russian artists in those two cities and the presence of artists like Lissitsky in Berlin, and Sergei Sharshun and Ilia Zdanevich in Paris.

The nihilistic zeitgeist that followed the Great War originated Dada, and the Marxism of the Russian Revolution agreed in principle with their ideals. The artists often pushed the Dadaesque into Russian mass culture, in the form of absurdist and chance-based designs. Their goal was to cause the death of art. But, failing to do that, they mostly became artists who managed to break moulds and created great works of art.


Rompiendo moldes en la vida y el arte
Dada ruso 1914-1924
Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, España
6 de junio – 22 de octubre de 2018

Me gustó visitar esta exposición de arte hace un mes en Madrid, España, en el Museo Reina Sofía; el primero que cubro fuera del Reino Unido.

Aunque la exposición me pareció un poco larga debido a la cantidad de obras expuestas, alrededor de 250, fue bastante exhaustiva y me pareció interesante lograr una buena perspectiva del arte creado por los artistas vanguardistas rusos durante este período, de 1914 a 1924. La muestra incluye pinturas, collages, ilustraciones, esculturas, proyecciones de películas y publicaciones, y está dividido en tres partes.

Dada o Dadaism fue un movimiento de arte de la vanguardia europea que se desarrolló a principios del siglo XX en reacción a la Primera Guerra Mundial y tuvo un centro temprano en Zurich. El movimiento Dada rechazó la lógica, la razón y el esteticismo de la sociedad capitalista moderna, expresando irracionalidad y protestas absurdas en sus obras.

En lo que respecta al Dada ruso, las obras expuestas aquí se produjeron en el apogeo del florecimiento de Dada, entre la Primera Guerra Mundial y la muerte de Vladimir Lenin, que solía frecuentar el Cabaret Voltaire en Zurich, donde se originó este movimiento artístico.  Los dadaístas rusos en exposición, así como el resto de los dadaístas, apoyaron el internacionalismo y se involucraron en prácticas excéntricas y manifestaciones pacifistas.

La primera parte de la exposición, y también mi favorita, se centra en la abstracción ‘alógica’. Al entrar en la muestra, se pueden ver fotos de algunos de los dadaístas rusos, en una actitud bastante irreverente. En la siguiente sala hay algunas proyecciones de películas en blanco y negro, de las cuales también tomé una instantánea que se muestra a continuación. Una de las esculturas creadas en este período incluye “Relieve de esquina complejo“ de Vladimir Tatlin (1915), junto a la cual puedes verme posando para la foto.

TheArtBerries-Tatlin spt

The Art Blueberry performing next to Vladimir Tatlin’s, “Complex Corner-Relief”/”Relieve de esquina complejo” (1915).

Uno de los éxitos de esta exposición para mí fue ver los diseños del telón de escenario de la ópera futurista “Victoria sobre el sol”, producida por Malevich en 1913, que le llevó a crear su bien conocido “Black Square“ en 1915. No podemos ver la obra “Black Square” aquí, pero podemos ver un diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol y algunas otras variantes, incluyendo cuadros blancos y negros que me parecen estupendos. Se me puede ver posando junto a uno de ellos a continuación.

Kasimir Malevich, “Design for the curtain of the opera Victory over the Sun”/ “Diseño para el telón de la ópera Victoria sobre el Sol” – left/izq.
The Art Blueberry performing next to Malevich’s work.

Aleksei Morgunov fue citado dentro de la exposición diciendo: “En 1914-15, Malevich y yo decidimos que prácticamente todas los principios pictóricos que habían evolucionado a través de la negación de las formas anteriores nos conducían necesariamente al lienzo vacío. Nuestra tarea entonces consistía en crear formas nuevas que conservaran el carácter de las formas geométricas elementales. Una de esas formas era el cuadrado “.

Olga Rozanova, “In the Street”/ “En la calle” (1915) – left/izquierda
Aleksei Morgunov, “Composition no. 1″/ “Composición n. 1” – right/derecha.

En colaboración con el músico Mikhail Matyushin y el poeta Aleksei Kruchenykh, Malevich hizo un manifiesto llamando al rechazo del pensamiento racional. Querían cambiar los sistemas establecidos de la sociedad occidental. En la ópera “Victoria sobre el Sol”, los personajes intentaron abolir la razón capturando el sol y destruyendo el tiempo. Malevich llamó a esto Suprematismo, y este nuevo movimiento tiene que ver con la supremacía del color y la forma en la pintura.

La segunda sección abarca el período comprendido entre 1917 y 1924, desde la victoria de la Revolución Rusa hasta la muerte de Vladímir Lenin, que frecuentó Cabaret Voltaire en Zurich, tocando nociones como el internacionalismo. El suprematismo de Malevich tuvo una fuerte influencia en sus contemporáneos.

Como tal, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaia dijo en un testimonio: “Llegué a Vitebsk después de las celebraciones de Octubre, pero la ciudad aún brillaba por las decoraciones de Malevich: círculos, cuadrados, puntos y líneas de diferentes colores … Sentí que me encontraba en una ciudad embrujada, en ese momento todo era posible y maravilloso.”

Podemos ver esta influencia de Malevich en el diseño de Morgunov para la portada de la revista ‘The International of Art’, y en ‘The New Man’ de Litsitzki que se muestra a continuación.

Aleksei Morgunov, Unpublished cover of the journal The International of Art, 1919 / Portada inedita de la revista Internacional de arte – left/izq.
El Lisitzski, “The New Man”/ “El hombre nuevo” (1920-1923) – right/dcha.

La sección final explora las conexiones entre Rusia y dos de los principales centros Dada, París y Berlín, con obras de artistas rusos en esas dos ciudades y la presencia de artistas como Lissitsky en Berlín y Sergei Sharshun e Ilia Zdanevich en París.

El espíritu de la época nihilista que siguió a la Gran Guerra originó a Dadá y el marxismo de la Revolución rusa comulgaba en principio con sus ideales. Los artistas a menudo empujaban al dadaismo hacia la cultura de masas rusa, con forma de diseños absurdos y basados ​​en el azar. Su objetivo era causar la muerte del arte. Pero, al no hacer eso, en su mayoría se convirtieron en artistas que consiguieron romper moldes y crear grandes obras de arte.