Marvellous evocative sculptures

Cy Twombly
Sculpture
30 September – 21 December, 2019
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

This is a past art exhibition there was at the Gagosian art gallery in London at the end of last year. I’d to talk about it here because I didn’t have the time to do it while it was on and I really like this artist.

As we came into the gallery, we were surrounded by multiple sculpture pieces spread all over the two main gallery spaces. Many of Twombly’s sculptures are coated in white paint and are evocative of classical sculptures, where white is his “marble”. Some of them allude to architecture, geometry, and Egyptian and Mesopotamian statuary, as in the rectangular pedestals and circular structures.

Twombly made these sculptures on show out of found materials such as plaster, wood and iron. They are mostly modest in scale and can be easily associated to his paintings. The white paint over these materials gives them a very interesting texture that even tempted me to touch them.

As well as his paintings, the sculptures evoke narratives from antiquity and fragments of literature and poetry. However, as the artist said in an interview with David Sylvester for his exhibition at Kunstmuseum Basel in 2000, the demands of making sculpture were very different from those of painting. “[Sculpture is] a whole other state. And it’s a building thing. Whereas the painting is more fusing—fusing of ideas, fusing of feelings, fusing projected on atmosphere.” It seems to me that he envisioned sculpture more like a LEGO figure, whereas painting was more like a recipe in which you mix different ingredients to create a new dish.

Apart from the white sculptures, we came across others colours. A few of the sculptures were pink and we found that it was the perfect tone of pink for my colleague, The art blackberry, to interact with the artworks because she was wearing a coat with the same pink. The aesthetical qualities of these pictures can be appreciated below.

I hope we get to see a new art show on Cy Twombly’s painting or sculpture soon. I enjoyed looking at his sculptures, but I always enjoy his paintings more because they have more readings to me. But, of course, this is a personal preference you may not agree with. The last Twombly’s art show I really enjoyed was back in 2011 at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, where he was exhibited alongside Poussin, an artist deeply admired by him.


 

Maravillosas esculturas evocadoras

Cy Twombly
Escultura
30 de septiembre – 21 de diciembre de 2019
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, Londres

Esta es una exposición de arte pasada que hubo en la galería Gagosian en Londres a finales del año pasado. Me gustaría hablar sobre ella aquí, porque no tuve tiempo de hacerlo mientras estaba abierta, y me gusta este artista.

Según entramos en la galería, nos sentimos rodeadas de múltiples piezas de escultura repartidas por los dos espacios principales de la galería. Muchas de las esculturas de Twombly están recubiertas de pintura blanca, y evocan esculturas clásicas donde el blanco es su “mármol”. Algunas de ellas aluden a la arquitectura, la geometría y las estatuas egipcias y mesopotámicas, como en los pedestales rectangulares y las estructuras circulares.

Twombly hizo estas esculturas en exposición con materiales encontrados como yeso, madera y hierro. En su mayoría son de escala modesta y se pueden asociar fácilmente a sus pinturas. La pintura blanca sobre estos materiales les da una textura muy interesante que parece invitarnos a tocarlas. 

Además de sus pinturas, las esculturas evocan narrativas de la antigüedad y fragmentos de literatura y poesía. Sin embargo, como dijo el artista en una entrevista con David Sylvester para su exposición en el Kunstmuseum Basel en 2000, las demandas de hacer esculturas eran muy diferentes de las de la pintura. “[La escultura es] un estado completamente diferente. Tiene que ver con construcción. Mientras que la pintura se fusiona más: fusión de ideas, fusión de sentimientos, fusión proyectada en la atmósfera “. Parece que imaginó la escultura más como una figura de LEGO, mientras que la pintura era más como una receta donde se mezclan diferentes ingredientes para crear un nuevo plato.

Además de las esculturas blancas, encontramos otros colores. Algunas de las esculturas eran de color rosa y descubrimos que era el tono rosado perfecto para mi colega, The art blackberry, para interactuar con las obras de arte porque llevaba un abrigo del mismo color rosa. Las cualidades estéticas de estas imágenes se pueden apreciar a continuación.

Espero que podamos ver una nueva muestra de arte de pintura o escultura de Cy Twombly pronto. Disfruté viendo sus esculturas, pero siempre disfruto más de sus pinturas porque tienen más lecturas para mí. Por supuesto, esto es una preferencia personal con la que puedes no estar de acuerdo. La última muestra de arte de Twombly que realmente disfruté fue en 2011 en la Dulwich Picture Gallery, donde fue expuesto junto a Poussin, un artista profundamente admirado por Twombly.

Retelling stories through found objects

Rayyane Tabet
Encounters
24 September – 14 December 2019
Parasol Unit foundation for contemporary art, London, UK
Free entry

The current art show at Parasol Unit that finishes this week is by Beirut-born and based artist Rayyane Tabet, who presents here 8 works from the past 13 years, installed together for the first time. I didn’t know this artist previously, but I was pleasantly surprised by his work. The minimalist quality of his artworks comes along with historial and cultural references to his birthplace of Lebanon that he combines sometimes with personal stories.

The artist appears to be interested in communicating an alternative view of the main political and economic events that have taken place in his country in recent years. Not only that, with his artwork he wants to contribute to the outside world’s understanding of this complex place.

All of the above, helps the visitor to connect better with his work. Tabet takes inspiration from overlooked objects that he wraps with personal anecdotes and supranational histories. According to Tabet, how Lebanon is perceived by the outside world and even by Lebaneses has no common version in history textbooks. Children in different communities are taught different versions of history.

“I’m interested in the question of whether we could create a history told by objects and materials. A lot of the time those last longer than people and are able to overcome moments of violence and marginalisation in a way that people cannot.” the artist says. 

On the ground floor, at the back of the gallery The art berries found a big red star hanging from the ceiling together with a red horse among other objects. We liked the star for some art interaction. See some photos below.

Another artwork very relevant in the show is a couple of oars of a rowing boat. The artist’s father was going to use that boat to escape their home country for Cyprus. The operation was aborted and long after that attempt of fleeting the family re-encounter the same boat by accident. The artist purchased it and decided to use as one of his artworks.

And finally, our favourite artwork on this exhibition was “Steel Rings” (2013–), a sequence of 28 rolled-steel rings arranged in a line. We liked this work for its minimalist simplicity and because it was a good art piece to interact with. Not particularly novel at first sight. But, when you pay a closer look at it and read about why the artist has chosen to display this work, you’ll be much more intrigued. Each of these rings is engraved with a distance and location in longitude and latitude, marking a specific place along the now defund Trans-Arabian Pipeline (TAPline). Built in 1947 by an alliance of US oil companies, and once the world’s largest long-distance oil pipeline, is still the only physical structure that crosses the borders of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Syria, the Golan, and Lebanon. When the American TAPline company finally closed down after decades of regional conflict, they abandoned the pipeline in situ.

The rings can be seen as a witness to that period of history. Tapline did not survive the first Gulf War (1990–91), at the onset of which it was abandoned as a result of Saudi Arabia’s opposition to Jordan’s support of Iraq. Although largely untold, this story remains part of popular consciousness and memory, and I believe that Tabet brings up the subject elegantly and skillfully inside the gallery.


 

Volver a contar historias a través de objetos encontrados

Rayyane Tabet
Encuentros
24 de septiembre – 14 de diciembre de 2019
Parasol Unit, Londres, Reino Unido.
Entrada libre

La exposición de arte que hay ahora en Parasol Unit y que termina esta semana es de Rayyane Tabet, un artista nacido y ubicado en Beirut que presenta aquí 8 obras de los últimos 13 años, instaladas juntas por primera vez. No conocía a este artista anteriormente, pero su trabajo me sorprendió gratamente. La calidad minimalista de sus obras de arte se acompaña de referencias históricas y culturales a su lugar de nacimiento del Líbano que a veces combina con historias personales.

El artista parece estar interesado en comunicar una visión alternativa de los principales acontecimientos políticos y económicos que han tenido lugar en su país en los últimos años. No solo eso, con sus obras de arte quiere contribuir a la comprensión externa de este complejo lugar. 

Todo lo anterior, ayuda al visitante a conectar mejor con su trabajo. Tabet se inspira en objetos pasados ​​por alto, que envuelve en anécdotas personales e historias supranacionales. Según Tabet, cómo el Líbano es percibido por el mundo exterior e incluso por los libaneses no tiene una versión común en los libros de texto de historia. A los niños de diferentes comunidades se les enseñan diferentes versiones de la historia.

“Me interesa la cuestión de si podríamos crear una historia contada por objetos y materiales. Muchas veces duran más que las personas y son capaces de superar los momentos de violencia y marginación de una manera que la gente no puede “, dice el artista. 

En la parte posterior de la planta baja de la galería, The art berries encontramos una gran estrella roja colgando del techo junto con un caballo rojo entre otros objetos. Nos gustó la estrella para interactuar y tomar alguna foto. Podrás ver algunas fotos a continuación.

Otra obra de arte muy relevante en la exposición es un par de remos de un bote. El padre del artista iba a usar ese bote para escapar de su país de origen hacia Chipre. La operación fue abortada y mucho después de ese intento de huir de la familia se reencontró con el mismo bote  por accidente. El artista lo compró y decidió usarlo como una de sus obras de arte.

Y finalmente, nuestra obra de arte favorita en esta exposición fue Steel Rings (2013–), una secuencia de 28 anillos de acero laminado dispuestos en una línea. Nos gusto esta obra estéticamente por su simplicidad minimalista y como pieza de arte con la cual interactuar. No es particularmente novedosa a primera vista. Sin embargo, cuando echas un vistazo más de cerca y lees sobre por qué el artista ha elegido mostrar este trabajo, estarás mucho más intrigado. Cada uno de estos anillos está grabado con una distancia y ubicación en longitud y latitud, marcando un lugar específico a lo largo de la tubería Trans-Arabian (TAPline). Construido en 1947 por una alianza de compañías petroleras estadounidenses, y que una vez fue el oleoducto de larga distancia más grande del mundo, sigue siendo la única estructura física que cruza las fronteras de Arabia Saudita, Jordania, Siria, el Golán y el Líbano. Cuando la compañía estadounidense TAPline finalmente cerró después de décadas de conflicto regional, abandonaron la tubería in situ.

Los anillos pueden ser vistos como testigos de ese período de la historia. TAPline no sobrevivió a la primera Guerra del Golfo (1990-1991), al comienzo de la cual fue abandonada como resultado de la oposición de Arabia Saudita al apoyo de Jordania a Irak. Aunque en gran parte no contada, esta historia sigue siendo parte de la conciencia y la memoria popular, y creo que Tabet emplea este tema con elegancia y habilidad dentro de la galería.

Rayyane Tabet_TAB_starRayyane Tabet_TAB_rings2

Looking for the real self

Doug Aitken
Return to the Real
2 October – 20 December 2019
Victoria Miro I, London, UK

Back to the art world and back on form. Not to say that I haven’t seen art exhibitions since my last post, but I’ve been busy with other things and I couldn’t find the time to post. Apologies to my readers. Here I am again and hopefully back on track every other week.

One of the last exhibitions seen by The art berries was “Return to the Real” by Doug Aitken, which I found interesting from both an aesthetic and an spiritual perspective.

As you enter the art show, the space downstairs is a dark room where you can see a translucent young woman resting on a table with her mobile phone out of reach and other elements with the same shiny appearance. Her groceries still on the plastic bag next to her. She hasn’t had a chance to put them in place. She’s surrounded by light boxes, illuminated dreamscapes, swimming pools, aeroplanes images, unmade white lovely beds and all sort of references to the life we lead in the contemporary world. A world dominated by technology that keep us distracted with images of how to scape from our daily routine and travel far away. Perhaps for just a week, maximum a month, but enough to keep us working towards that goal. Will our heroine find herself amid all these?

The response could lie upstairs. When you climb up the stairs you can see a female form in the middle of a scene dominated by moving sonic sculptures. The scene is like a contemplative scene. The moving sculptures are circular steel wind chimes that rotate in front of a flickering screen. Our heroine is carved in marble, Aitken, says, with ‘deep geological time’ and is bisected in two parts to reveal a mirrored interior. I wonder whether this is the same girl from downstairs who’s managed to find her real self. I do hope so!

Dough Aitken is an an American artist and filmmaker whose work has been featured in multiple places around the world.


 

Buscando el verdadero yo

Doug Aitken
Return to the Real
2 de octubre – 20 de diciembre de 2019
Victoria Miro I, Londres, Reino Unido

De vuelta al mundo del arte y de vuelta en forma. No quiere decir que no haya visto exposiciones de arte desde mi último post, pero he estado ocupada con otras cosas y no he podido encontrar tiempo para publicar. Disculpas a mis lectores. Aquí estoy de nuevo y espero estar de vuelta cada dos semanas.

Una de las últimas exhibiciones vistas por The art berries fue “Return to the Real” de Doug Aitken, la cual me pareció interesante tanto desde una perspectiva estética como espiritual. Al entrar en la exposición de arte, el espacio de abajo es una habitación oscura donde puedes ver a una joven translúcida descansando sobre una mesa con su teléfono móvil fuera del alcance y otros elementos con la misma apariencia brillante. Su compra todavía en una bolsa de plástico a su lado. No ha tenido la oportunidad de ponerla en su sitio. Está rodeada de cajas de luz, paisajes oníricos iluminados, piscinas, imágenes de aviones, camas blancas sin hacer y todo tipo de referencias a la vida que llevamos en el mundo contemporáneo. Un mundo dominado por la tecnología que nos mantiene distraídos con imágenes de cómo escapar de nuestra rutina diaria y viajar lejos. Tal vez solo por una semana, un máximo de un mes, pero lo suficiente como para mantenernos trabajando hacia ese objetivo. Conseguirá nuestra heroína encontrarse a si misma en medio de todo esto?

La respuesta podría estar arriba. Cuando subes las escaleras puedes ver una forma femenina en medio de una escena dominada por esculturas sonoras en movimiento. La escena es como una escena contemplativa. Las esculturas en movimiento son campanillas de viento circulares de acero que giran frente a una pantalla parpadeante. Nuestra heroína está tallada en mármol, dice Aitken, con “tiempo geológico profundo” y está dividida en dos partes para revelar un interior de espejo. Me pregunto si esta es la misma chica de abajo que ha logrado encontrar su verdadero yo. ¡Espero que sí!

Dough Aitken es un artista y cineasta estadounidense cuyo trabajo se ha presentado en múltiples lugares del mundo.

Aitken5_ladyAitken6_bed

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Relics of a lost era

Mike Nelson
The asset stripper
18 March – 6 October 2019
Tate Britain, London, UK

The art berries visited Tate Britain recently and came across the installation there is currently at the Duveen Galleries by Mike Nelson. He’s turned this space, originally conceived as the first purpose-built sculpture galleries in England, into an objects strippers’ warehouse using numerous recent industrial relics.

Nelson has chosen to gather objects from post-war Britain that he used to see in his childhood such as big knitting machines and doors from the NHS and display them along the large central corridor at the Tate known as Duveen galleries. Somehow it looks like a monument to a lost era and the vision of society they represent. The art installation has cultural as well as social allusions that go from a local to a national perspective.

The artist has been buying this metal objects at asset-stripping auctions for years. Some machines are the kind of equipment used in textile factories where Nelson’s parents and grandparents worked. However, they now seem to be mysterious objects taken from a distant culture. I thought  initially that they had been taken from a different country, like an old British colony. They make me think of the hard work that is needed to manufacture the clothes we wear; years ago from people who worked in those jobs in western countries and now mostly from people based overseas. Is this a sustainable production model? I do believe that we need to start doing much more up-cycling within the fashion industry. Below you can see a photo of the knitting machine below with me on it.

Then we come across swing doors with porthole windows through which we can enter from an old London hospital, like the living and the dead, which adds to the feeling of a surreal experience. Not only that, some of Nelson’s works speak directly to the museum’s collection. Like the one of those hay rakes that whirl like sunflowers in the early surrealism of Joan Miró. You can see The art blackberry interacting with this art piece. Is she surrendering to sleep and dreaming with those massive sunflower wheels?

Nelson’s sculpture alludes to the industrial functions of metal. He allows his objects to be relics first, sculptures second, and machines again with a mysterious appearance that makes you look at them in a  new light.

Mike Nelson is a contemporary British artist who creates large-scale architectural installations. He has been shortlisted twice for the Turner prize and has represented Britain at the 2011 Venice Biennale.


 

Reliquias de una era perdida

Mike Nelson
The asset stripper
18 de marzo – 6 de octubre de 2019
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido

The art berries visitamos Tate Britain recientemente y nos encontramos con la instalación que hay de Mike Nelson en las Duveen galleries. El artista ha convertido este espacio, originalmente concebido como la primera galería de esculturas especialmente diseñada en Inglaterra, en un almacén de objetos que utiliza numerosas reliquias industriales recientes.

Nelson eligió recoger objetos del período de posguerra en Gran Bretaña que él solía ver en su infancia, como grandes máquinas de tejer y las puertas del NHS y exponerlas a lo largo del pasillo central de la galería conocido como Duveen galleries. De alguna manera, parece un monumento a una era perdida y la visión de la sociedad que representan. La instalación de arte tiene alusiones culturales y sociales que van desde una perspectiva local a otra nacional.

El artista ha estado comprando estos objetos de metal en subastas de desmonte de activos durante años. Algunas máquinas son el tipo de equipo utilizado en las fábricas textiles donde trabajaban sus padres y abuelos. Sin embargo, ahora parecen ser objetos misteriosos tomados de una cultura lejana. Al principio pensé que habían sido tomadas de un país diferente, como una antigua colonia británica. Me hacen pensar en el trabajo duro que se necesita para fabricar la ropa que usamos; años atrás procedente de personas que trabajaban en países occidentales y ahora principalmente de personas que viven en otros países más pobres. ¿Es éste un modelo de producción sostenible? Creo que debemos comenzar a hacer mucho más reciclaje o up-cycling dentro de la industria de la moda. A continuación puedes ver una foto de la máquina de tejer conmigo dentro.

Luego nos encontramos con puertas batientes con ventanillas a través de las cuales podemos entrar en un antiguo hospital de Londres, como los vivos y los muertos, lo que se suma a la sensación de una experiencia surrealista. No sólo eso, algunas de las obras de Nelson hablan directamente de la colección del museo. Como el de esos rastrillos de heno que giran como girasoles en el surrealismo temprano de Joan Miró. Puedes ver a The art blackberry interactuando con esta pieza de arte. ¿Está durmiendo y soñando con esas enormes ruedas de girasol?

La escultura de Nelson alude a las funciones industriales del metal. Él permite que sus objetos sean reliquias primero, esculturas en segundo lugar, y máquinas de nuevo con una apariencia misteriosa que te hace mirarlos desde una nueva perspectiva.

Mike Nelson es un artista británico contemporáneo que crea instalaciones arquitectónicas a gran escala. Ha sido pre-seleccionado dos veces para el premio Turner y ha representado a Gran Bretaña en la Bienal de Venecia 2011.

MN_Theartberries_yellow2MN_Theartberries_b&wMN_Theartberries_yellow1MN_Theartberries_yellow3MN_Theartberries_knittingmachine2MN_Theartberries_knittingmachine1

MN_Theartberries_sunflowers

The language of cities

Sarah Morris
17 April 2019 – 30 June 2019
White Cube Bermondsey, London, UK

This is one of the last exhibitions I’ve seen and I wanted to share a few comments and photos that we took there with you here.

White Cube Bermondsey is now displaying the work of Sarah Morris (1967), an artist born in the UK, who lives in New York City (US). The art show, formed mostly by abstract paintings, reflects on the artist’s interest in networks, typologies, architecture, language and the city. Morris plays with the viewer’s sense of visual recognition, often referencing elements of architecture, but also the graphic identity of multinational corporations, the iconography of maps, GPS technology, as well as the movement of people within urban environments.

For instance, her new series of ‘Sound Graph’ paintings use the language of American abstraction, minimalism and pop art, while the forms are derived from the artist’s sound files, using the speech from audio recordings as a starting point for the compositions. You can see me (the art blueberry) interacting with one of these paintings ‘Reality is its own ideology (Sound Graph)’ below. The inherent movement in these pictures responds to the theme of the painting that comes from an audio recording.

There’s also an artwork that occupies a separate room and includes Morris’s first sculpture, titled ‘What can be explained can also be predicted (2019)’. It’s made of modular, glass tubes of various heights and colours over a colourful plinth that reminded me of city skyscrapers, but they are also like a musical instrument. It’s a phallic and architectonic sculpture at the same time. 

Morris’ work is full references to the cities we inhabit these days. A constantly evolving network of visual, social and political connections that make cities full of vibrancy and energy, always opening space for change and innovation.


 

El lenguaje de las ciudades

Sarah Morris
17 de abril de 2019 – 30 de junio de 2019
White Cube Bermondsey, Londres, Reino Unido

Esta es una de las últimas exposiciones de arte que he visto y quería compartir algunos comentarios y fotos que hicimos allí con vosotros.

White Cube Bermondsey muestra ahora el trabajo de Sarah Morris (1967), una artista nacida en el Reino Unido que vive en Nueva York (USA). La muestra de arte, formada principalmente por pinturas abstractas, refleja el interés de la artista en las redes, las tipologías, la arquitectura, el idioma y la ciudad. Morris juega con el reconocimiento visual del espectador, haciendo referencia a menudo  a elementos de la arquitectura, pero también a la identidad gráfica de corporaciones multinacionales, a la iconografía de los mapas, a la tecnología GPS, así como al movimiento de personas en entornos urbanos.

Por ejemplo, su nueva serie de pinturas ‘Sound Graph’ utiliza el lenguaje de la abstracción estadounidense, el minimalismo y el arte pop, mientras que las formas se derivan de los archivos de sonido de la artista, utilizando grabaciones de audio como punto de partida para las composiciones. Puedes verme (The art blueberry) interactuar con una de estas pinturas “Realidad es su propia ideología (Sound Graph)” a continuación. El movimiento inherente en estas imágenes responde al tema de esta pintura que se deriva de una grabación de audio.

También hay una obra de arte que ocupa una habitación separada e incluye la primera escultura de Morris, titulada “Lo que se puede explicar también se puede predecir (2019)”. Está hecha de tubos de vidrio modulares de varias alturas y colores sobre un colorido zócalo que me recuerda a los rascacielos de muchas ciudades, pero también es como un instrumento musical. Es una escultura fálica y arquitectónica a la vez. 

La obra de Morris está llena de referencias a las ciudades que habitamos en estos días. Una red en constante evolución de conexiones visuales, sociales y políticas que hacen que las ciudades estén llenas de vitalidad y energía, siempre abriendo espacio para el cambio y la innovación.

Sarah Morris_WC_Theartblueberry2Sarah Morris_WC_Theartblueberry1

The rat king with monkeys

NS Harsha
11 April – 18 May
Victoria Miro Gallery I, London

The art berries visited this art exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery and we’d like to share a few photos here despite the show is now finished. I’m sure you’ll be able to see more work from NS Harsha  in another big city sometime soon.

The artwork we focused on is “Tamasha” (2013), an installation of larger-than-life size monkeys that appear onto a scaffolding structure. The monkeys are pointing upwards to the heavens while their tails are intertwined and tied to each other. The word Tamasha can refer to political upheaval or even human folly. Moreover, Harsha refers to the phenomenon of the rat king and its appearance in northern folklore traditions since the sixteenth century, where rat kings are associated with various superstitions and were often seen as a bad omen for being associated with plagues.

See The art blackberry below interacting with this artwork pointing to the heavens and placing herself next to the scaffolding, where the monkeys are suspended and tether to each other. Since monkeys are our ancestors, it seems plausible to me to take part on this installation :-P.

NS Harsha (born 1969) is an Indian artist born and based in Mysore. He works in many media including painting, sculpture, site-specific installation, and public works. His works “depict daily experiences in Mysore, southern India, where he is based, but also reflect wider cultural, political and economic globalization issues” and explore the “absurdity of the real world, representation and abstraction, and repeating images”. His practice has been inspired by Indian popular and miniature painting. (Source: Wikipedia).


 

El rey de las ratas con monos

NS Harsha
11 de abril – 18 de mayo
Victoria Miro Gallery I, Londres

The art berries visitamos esta exposición de arte en la galería Victoria Miró y nos gustaría compartir algunas fotos aquí a pesar de que la muestra ya ha terminado. Estoy segura de que pronto podrás ver más trabajos de NS Harsha en otra gran ciudad dentro de poco.

La obra de arte en la que nos enfocamos es “Tamasha” (2013), una instalación de monos de tamaño más grande que en la realidad que aparecen en una estructura de andamios. Los monos apuntan hacia el cielo mientras que sus colas están entrelazadas y unidas entre sí. La palabra Tamasha puede referirse a agitación política o incluso locura humana. Además, Harsha se refiere al fenómeno del rey de las ratas y su aparición en las tradiciones populares del norte desde el siglo XVI, donde los reyes de las ratas se asocian con varias supersticiones y se consideran a menudo como un mal presagio por estar asociados con plagas.

Debajo puedes ver a The art blackberry interactuando con esta obra de arte y apuntando al cielo, mientras se pega a los andamios donde los monos están suspendidos y atados entre sí. Dado que los monos son nuestros antepasados, me parece plausible participar en esta instalación :-P.

NS Harsha (nacido en 1969) es un artista indio nacido y residente en Mysore. Trabaja en muchos medios, como pintura, escultura, instalación específica del sitio y obras públicas. Sus trabajos “representan experiencias cotidianas en Mysore, en el sur de la India, donde se basa, pero también reflejan temas más amplios de globalización cultural, política y económica” y exploran el “absurdo del mundo real, la representación y la abstracción, y la repetición de imágenes”. Su práctica se ha inspirado en la pintura popular y en miniatura de la India. (Fuente: Wikipedia).

NS Harsha_Theartblacberryfurther

A master of serious play

Franz West
20 February – 2 June 2019
Tate Modern, London, UK

Tate Modern is currently hosting an art exhibition of Franz West that The art berries visited recently and I would like to share with you, our pictures and my views on the show.

I have previously covered on this blog an exhibition about Franz West that was at the Gagosian art gallery in Davies street last summer. And as I mentioned previously, West’s unconventional sculptures often look for an involvement from the audience. Hence, his artworks are the best example of art we like to interact with, and artists we admire with regards to his approach to art. Read more about West on “The struggle in all artistic pursuits” post.

As you enter the art exhibition, you come across the “Passstücke” or “Adaptives”, plaster sculptures with embedded found objects that could be picked and interact with, just as he did with his friends as you can see nearby on videos. I took my chance to play with them and enjoyed the go. Take a look at the photos below in which I dress in black and interact with white sculptures in imaginary fitting rooms where you can even close the curtains and gain more privacy. I didn’t feel the need to hide though 😉

Further down the show, we came across his “Legitimate Sculptures”, papier-mâché clumps made with everyday objects like a hat or a broom, and painted in some areas but raw in others. They were evocative of bodies, but more abstract than figurative in my view. He even played with furniture, as we can appreciate with the carpet-covered settees. Art to be sat on and have a space for conversation.

In his final years apparently he created large, brightly coloured sculptures both for galleries and public spaces, some of which can be seen outside the Tate gallery.

I like Franz West’ irreverent and playful approach to art. His sculptures were a turning point in the relationship between art and its audience, and I wish there were more artist like him.


 

Un maestro del juego serio

Franz West
20 de febrero – 2 de junio de 2019.
Tate Modern, Londres, Reino Unido

Tate Modern está mostrando ahora una exposición de arte de Franz West que The art berries visitamos recientemente y me gustaría compartir aquí; nuestras fotos y mis opiniones sobre la muestra.

Ya cubrí en este blog una exposición sobre Franz West que estuvo en la galería de arte de Gagosian en Davies Street el verano pasado. Y como mencioné anteriormente, las esculturas no convencionales de West a menudo buscan una participación de la audiencia. Por lo tanto, sus obras de arte son el mejor ejemplo de arte con el que nos gusta interactuar y de artistas que admiramos con respecto al enfoque de su trabajo. Lee más sobre West en la publicación “La lucha en todas las actividades artísticas“.

Al entrar en la exposición de arte, te encuentras con los “Passstücke” o “Adaptives”, esculturas de yeso con objetos encontrados incrustados con los que puedes interactuar, tal como hizo el artista con sus amigos como puedes ver en videos cercanos. Aproveché la oportunidad para jugar con ellos y disfruté haciéndolo. Echa un vistazo a las fotos a continuación en las que voy vestida de negro e interactúo con esculturas blancas en espacios separados por cortinas, donde incluso puede cerrarlas y obtener más privacidad. Aunque yo no sentí la necesidad de esconderme 😉

Más abajo en la exposición, encontramos sus “Esculturas legítimas”, grupos de papel-maché hechos con objetos cotidianos como un sombrero o una escoba, y pintados en algunas áreas, pero crudos en otras. Eran evocadores de cuerpos, pero más abstractos que figurativos desde mi punto de vista. West jugaba incluso con los muebles, como podemos apreciar con los divanes cubiertos de alfombras. El arte para sentarse y tener un espacio para conversar.

Al parecer, en sus últimos años creó grandes esculturas de colores brillantes tanto para galerías como para espacios públicos, algunas de las cuales se pueden ver fuera de la galería Tate.

Me gusta el enfoque irreverente y juguetón de Franz West en el arte. Sus esculturas fueron un punto de inflexión en la relación entre el arte y su público, y desearía que hubiera más artistas como él.

Franz West-TAB-two roomsFranz West-TAB-TheartblueberrydownFranz West-TAB-TheartblueberryupFranz West-TAB-TheartblackberrysittingFranz West-TAB-Theartblackberryhair