In search of infinity

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Fly in league with the night
18 November 2020 – 31 May 2021
Tate Britain, London, UK.

I was pleased to go to this art exhibition soon after it opened at Tate. Mainly because after Christmas the UK went in lockdown for COVID-19 and all art galleries closed. But, you are still in time to visit it if you’re in London because Tate Britain is now open and this show is on until the 31st May.

The artist is Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, a British painter and writer born in London in 1977 to Ghanaian parents, and one of the most aclaimed painters working today. Not surprisingly, as she’s had many years of academic training. She learned to paint from life and changed her approach to painting at an early stage, while studying at Falmouth School of Art, on the Cornish coast. Yiadom-Boakye realised she was less interested in making portraits of people and more in the act of painting itself.

Yiadom-Boakye paints black people, in the most traditional European art form: oil painting on canvas. The painters she admires include: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. And her high level of execution has led her to win prizes such as the prestigious Carnegie Prize in 2018, and to be shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye is well-know for her enigmatic portraits of fictitious people, who live in private worlds. Both familiar and mysterious, they invite viewers to project their own interpretations, and raise important questions of identity and representation. She mentioned in an interview recently that she keeps coming back to the idea of “infinity”.

She takes inspiration from found images, memories, literature and the history of painting. Each painting is an exploration of a different mood, movement and pose, worked out on the surface of the canvas. I see why the artist says her figures aren’t real people, although her source of inspiration seems to be real people. She likes to place the role of narrative in the viewer, and let our imaginations go free when we encounter her works, and that’s not what happens when you see a portrait of someone.

“I write about the things I can’t paint and paint the things I can’t write about.”
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

A writer of prose and poetry as well as a painter, the artist sees both forms of creativity as separate but intertwined, and gives her paintings poetic titles, which she describes as as ‘an extra brush-mark’. However she doesn’t see the titles as an explanation or description, just a way to release our imagination.

We both of The art berries enjoyed this exhibition. The figures on these paintings command your attention, either because of their gaze or the mysteriousness behind the scenes. They were like part of a dream or an old memory that transcends time. The subdued colours at first sight are in some paintings very vibrant, like the things or elements that appear in your dreams.

The artist uses timeless elements in her search for infinity. The enigmatic subjects and sensuality of most of the artworks on display, and the use of only black people on her paintings make them very contemporary, despite the references for her style are so classic.


En busca del infinito
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
Vuela en liga con la noche
18 de noviembre de 2020-9 de mayo de 2021
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido.

Me gustó ir a esta exposición de arte poco después de su inauguración en la Tate. Principalmente porque después de Navidad el Reino Unido quedó cerrado for el COVID-19 y todas las galerías de arte cerraron. Pero aún estás a tiempo de visitarla si estás en Londres porque la Tate Britain ya está abierta y esta exposición no cierra hasta el 31 de mayo.

La artista es Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, una pintora y escritora británica nacida en Londres en 1977 de padres ghaneses, y una de las pintoras más aclamadas en la actualidad. No es de extrañar, ya que ha tenido muchos años de formación académica. Aprendió a pintar en vivo y cambió su enfoque de la pintura en una etapa temprana, mientras estudiaba en Falmouth School of Art, en la costa de Cornualles. Yiadom-Boakye se dio cuenta de que estaba menos interesada en hacer retratos de personas y más en el acto de pintar en sí.

Yiadom-Boakye pinta personas de raza negra, en la técnica de pintura europea más tradicional: pintura al óleo sobre lienzo. Los pintores que admira son: Velázquez, Manet, Degas, Sickert. Y su alto grado de ejecución la ha llevado a ganar premios como el prestigioso Carnegie Prize en 2018, y a ser preseleccionada para el Turner Prize en 2013.

Yiadom-Boakye es conocida por sus enigmáticos retratos de personas ficticias que viven en mundos privados. Tanto familiares como misteriosos, invitan a los espectadores a proyectar sus propias interpretaciones y plantean importantes cuestiones de identidad y representación. Recientemente, mencionó en una entrevista que continua volviendo a la idea de “infinito”.

Se inspira en imágenes encontradas, recuerdos, literatura e historia de la pintura. Cada pintura es una exploración de un estado de ánimo, movimiento y pose diferente, elaborado en la superficie del lienzo. Entiendo por qué la artista dice que sus figuras no son personas reales, aunque parezca que su fuente de inspiración son personas de carne y hueso. Le gusta colocar el papel de la narrativa en el espectador y dejar que nuestra imaginación se libere cuando nos encontramos con sus obras, y eso no es lo que sucede cuando ves un retrato de alguien.

“Escribo sobre las cosas que no puedo pintar y pinto las cosas sobre las que no puedo escribir”.
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Escritora de prosa y poesía, además de pintora, la artista ve ambas formas de creatividad como separadas pero entrelazadas, y le da a sus pinturas títulos poéticos, que describe como “una marca de pincel adicional”. Sin embargo, ella no ve los títulos como una explicación o descripción, solo una forma de liberar nuestra imaginación.

Las dos integrantes de The art berries disfrutamos bastante de esta exposición. Las figuras de estas pinturas llaman tu atención, bien sea por cómo te miran o por el misterio detrás de cada escena. Son como parte de un sueño o un viejo recuerdo que trasciende el tiempo. Los colores tenues a primera vista son en algunas pinturas muy vibrantes, como las cosas o elementos que aparecen en los sueños.

La artista utiliza elementos atemporales en su búsqueda del infinito. Lo cual combinado con el misterio y la sensualidad de la mayoría de las obras de arte expuestas, y el uso únicamente de personas de raza negra en sus pinturas las hacen muy contemporáneas, a pesar de que las referencias de su estilo sean tan clásicas.

The art of resilience in life

María Berrío
Flowered Songs and Broken Currents
6 October – 18 December 2020
Victoria Miro gallery, London, UK

This is an art exhibition I saw at Victoria Miro gallery and is still available to view on Vortic Collect until 18 December 2020. As I came in, the upper galleries were filled with light and colour coming from the artworks created by María Berrío, a Colombian artist based in Brooklyn, NYC. Her works are mostly made with Japanese print paper and reflect on cross-cultural connections and global migration seen through the prism of her own history.

Latin American folklore may come to your mind when you see the colour brightness of these artworks, as well as an uneasy feeling because of the gaze and loneliness of the women represented. In 2019 the artist started researching small fishing villages in Colombia – the country where she was born and raised- and became intrigued by the stories of these villages and their inhabitants. These stories inspired her to imagine her own fishing village in the language of magical realism, a style of fiction that paints a realistic view of the modern world while also adding magical elements. Berrío created this series of artworks to explore the modes of resilience and adaptation that arise out of loss. They depict the women and children that are left behind.

A sense of loss can be perceived out of these artworks, but also a sense of rebirth. For instance, one of my favourite works in this show is ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020, showing a woman about four months pregnant, sitting lonely in a big classical armchair . On one side of the armchair there is a plant and flowers on the window, symbols of rebirth. The sky is blue outside. Children are still being born; there is still hope for the human race. See photos of the artworks below.

Another work from Berrío ‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020, was a bit worrying at first sight. “This nods to our attempts to categorise and frame events, to contain them in a way that enables us to understand them”, says the artist. The two birds in this artwork represent the past and the present. “She grabs the present in her hand, but her past remains beside her, impossible to leave behind.”

My favourite artwork in this art show has no figure on it though. It depicts only a tree ‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020. According to the artist “The beauty and glory of nature is figure enough…By distancing ourselves mentally, technologically, and materially from nature, we not only fail to see nature’s wonder but also our own place in that wonder. We react in shock and horror to discover that we, too, are but one fragment of something far grander than our laughter and sadness. This tree, like all trees – as well as all birds, mountains, stars, and people – will live, die, and be reborn again.” I chose to interact with this artwork because I love trees; they are a symbol of life for me.

I really like the artist’s cyclical perception of the universe, and the way in which she focuses on female strength. This show is like a homage to Latin American women for the endurance and strength they demonstrate on a daily basis. How they are able to overcome all kind of political and sociological events such as migration, poverty and loss and reinvent themselves again.


El arte de la fortaleza humana
María Berrío
Flowered Songs and Broken Currents
6 de octubre – 18 de diciembre de 2020
Galería Victoria Miro, Londres, Reino Unido

Esta es una exposición de arte que ví en la galería Victoria Miro y todavía está disponible para ver en Vortic Collect hasta el 18 de diciembre del 2020. Al entrar, las galerías superiores estaban llenas de luz y color procedente de las obras de arte creadas por María Berrío, artista colombiana ubicada en Brooklyn, Nueva York. Sus obras están hechas en su mayoría con papel japonés y reflejan las conexiones interculturales y la migración global vistas a través del prisma de su propia historia.

El folklore latinoamericano puede venir a tu mente cuando ves la abundancia de colores de estas obras de arte, así como un sentimiento de inquietud por la mirada de soledad de las mujeres representadas. En 2019, la artista comenzó a investigar pequeños pueblos de pescadores en Colombia -el país donde nació y se crió- y se sintió intrigada por las historias de estos pueblos y sus habitantes. Estas historias la inspiraron a imaginar su propio pueblo de pescadores impregnado del lenguaje del realismo mágico, un estilo de ficción que pinta una visión realista del mundo y al mismo tiempo agrega elementos mágicos. Berrío creó esta serie de obras de arte para explorar los modos de resistencia humana y adaptación que surgen de la pérdida. Representan a las mujeres y los niños que se quedan atrás.

Se puede percibir una sensación de pérdida en estas obras de arte, pero también una sensación de renacimiento. Por ejemplo, una de mis obras favoritas es ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020, que muestra a una mujer embarazada de unos cuatro meses, sentada sola en un gran sofa de diseño clásico. A un lado del sillón hay una planta y flores en la ventana, símbolos de renacimiento. Fuera el cielo es azul. Todavía están naciendo niños; todavía hay esperanza para la raza humana. Puedes ver las fotos de las obras de arte más abajo.

Otro trabajo de Berrío ‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020, me pareció un poco inquietante a primera vista. “Esto hace referencia a nuestros intentos de categorizar y enmarcar los eventos, de contenerlos de una manera que nos permita comprenderlos”, dice la artista. Los dos pájaros de esta obra de arte representan el pasado y el presente. “Agarra el presente en su mano, pero su pasado permanece a su lado, imposible de dejar atrás”.

Sin embargo, mi obra preferida en esta muestra no tiene figura. Representa sólo un árbol ‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020. Según la artista “La belleza y la gloria de la naturaleza es figura suficiente … Al distanciarnos mental, tecnológica y materialmente de la naturaleza, no solo dejamos de ver la maravilla de la naturaleza, sino también nuestro propio lugar en esa maravilla. Reaccionamos conmocionados y horrorizados al descubrir que también nosotros somos un fragmento de algo mucho más grandioso que nuestra risa y tristeza. Este árbol, como todos los árboles, así como todos los pájaros, montañas, estrellas y personas, vivirán, morirán y renacerán de nuevo “. Elegí interactuar con esta obra de arte porque me encantan los árboles; son un símbolo de vida para mí.

Me gusta mucho la percepción cíclica del universo que tiene la artista y la forma en que se enfoca en la fortaleza femenina. Esta muestra es como un homenaje a las mujeres latinoamericanas por la resistencia y la fuerza que muestran en el día a día. Cómo son capaces de superar todo tipo de eventos políticos y sociológicos como la migración, la pobreza y la pérdida, y son capaces de reinventarse de nuevo.

María Berrío, ‘Clouded infinity’, 2020
María Berrío, ‘Clouded Infinity’, (Detail) 2020
María Berrío,‘There Is No Sky for Ground Spirits’, 2020
María Berrío,‘Miracles of Ordinary Light’, 2020
María Berrío,‘Under a Cold Sun’, 2020
María Berrío, ‘Crowned Solitudes’, 2020

A modern new language in sculpture

New Generation Sculpture
Tate Britain, London, UK
Until 4 November 2018

I’ve been out of London for nearly three weeks in Spain, reason for which I haven’t been very active here. Now I’d like to briefly cover one of the exhibitions on display at Tate Britain and lasting until the beginning of November. It’s the “New Generation Sculpture” display that focuses on a group of artists who in the 1960s embraced a new language to express themselves in sculpture, turning away from conventional techniques of carving and modelling and traditional materials. They changed stone, clay, wood or bronze to start using modern materials, including fibreglass or plastic sheeting. Moreover, their work was mostly abstract rather than figurative.

Many of this artists first came to public attention through “The New Generation” show, a series of exhibitions held at the Whitechapel Gallery in London in the 1960s. The second of these exhibitions featured David Annesley, Michael Bolus, Phillip King, Tim Scott, William Tucker and Isaac Witkin in the spring of 1965. All of them had studied under Anthony Caro at St. Martin’s School of Art, who had encouraged them to pioneer an innovative approach with the use of modern and industrial materials as well as presenting their works directly on the floor, without the use of a plinth.

From all the works displayed on the “New Generation Sculpture” show at Tate Britain, I particularly liked the “Tra-La-La” sculpture from Phillip King (1963), where I blended with the artwork.

King began to use fibreglass in the early 1960s to make coloured sculptures for the new possibilities offered by this material that allowed him to mould new shapes and structures in a completely new manner. Not only that, he was strongly interested in the way colour can communicate with the audience. He selected colour from more than four hundred pieces of paper that he attached to the sculpture to help him choose the final one. That is what I call ‘accuracy’!

See more images on this exhibition here.

A new review on “Russian Dada” coming up soon based on the exhibition currently on show at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid, Spain.


Un nuevo lenguaje moderno en escultura
Escultura de nueva generación
Tate Britain, Londres, Reino Unido
Hasta el 4 de noviembre de 2018

He estado fuera de Londres durante casi tres semanas en España, por lo que no he estado muy activa aquí. Me gustaría cubrir brevemente una de las muestras que pueden verse ahora en Tate Britain y que durará hasta principios de noviembre. Es la exposición “New Generation Sculpture” que se enfoca en un grupo de artistas que en la década de 1960 abrazaron un nuevo lenguaje para expresarse en escultura, alejándose de las técnicas convencionales de tallado y modelado y materiales tradicional. Cambiaron piedra, arcilla, madera o bronce para comenzar a usar materiales modernos, como fibra de vidrio o láminas de plástico. Además, su trabajo fue principalmente abstracto en lugar de figurativo.

Muchos de estos artistas llegaron a la atención pública por primera vez a través de la muestra “The New Generation”, una serie de exposiciones que tuvo lugar en la Whitechapel Gallery de Londres en la década de 1960. La segunda de estas exhibiciones contó con la participación de David Annesley, Michael Bolus, Phillip King, Tim Scott, William Tucker e Isaac Witkin en la primavera de 1965. Todos ellos habían estudiado con Anthony Caro en la St. Martin’s School of Art, quien los había alentado a usar un enfoque innovador con el uso de materiales modernos e industriales y la presentación de sus obras directamente en el suelo, sin el uso de un zócalo.

De todas las obras expuestas en Tate Britain en este momento parte de “New Generation Sculpture”, me gustó especialmente la escultura “Tra-La-La” de Phillip King (1963), donde me mezclé con la obra de arte.

King comenzó a usar fibra de vidrio en la década de 1960 para hacer esculturas de colores por las nuevas posibilidades que ofrece este material que le permitieron moldear nuevas formas y estructuras de una manera completamente nueva. No solo eso, estaba muy interesado en la forma en que el color se comunica con la audiencia. Seleccionaba el color de más de cuatrocientas piezas de papel que colgaba en la escultura para ayudarle a elegir el color final. ¡Eso es lo que llamo ‘precisión’!

Vea más imágenes de esta exposición aquí.

Pronto estará disponible en este espacio una nueva crítica sobre “Dada ruso” basada en la exposición que actualmente se exhibe en el Museo Reina Sofía de Madrid, España.

The art berries-Phillip King2

The struggle in all artistic pursuits

Franz West
Sisyphos sculptures
Gagosian, Davies Street, London, UK
June 8 – July 27, 2018

In Greek mythology Sisyphus or Sisyphos was the first king of Ephyra, who was punished by Zeus for his deceitfulness and proudness and forced to roll a heavy boulder up a steep hill, only for it to roll down when it nears the top, repeating this action for eternity.

The last art exhibition there was at the Gagosian in Davies Street, London, by Franz West (Vienna, 1947 – Vienna, 2012) referred to the myth told above. The show ended last week, so you’ll have to see these artworks somewhere else they travel to. But, I wanted to share them with you nevertheless, because I think that the sculptures are beautiful and I like the photos we did when we performed at the art space.

Belonging to a generation of artists exposed to the Actionist and Performance Art of the 1960s and 70s, Franz West rejected the idea of a passive relationship between artwork and viewer. He investigated the dichotomy between private and public, action and reaction, both in and outside the gallery, and used everyday materials and imagery to examine art’s relation to social experience.

The Sisyphus myth the artist referred to with this show at the Gagosian gallery is an exploration of the unrelenting frustration of the creative process, the struggle involved in all artistic pursuits that artists and creative people in general are so familiar with.

Franz West unconventional sculpures often require an involvement of the audience, so they are the perfect example of artworks The art berries like to perform with. The ones where the artist encourages the interaction and don’t see our performance as an interference in their work. Having said that, I do believe that everyone should be free to interact with art and enjoy the arts as they please, as long as the artworks are respected. And that is indeed one of the missions of The art berries project.

For the photos displayed here we played with the notions of hide and exposure frequently touched by the artist in his career. Also by lying on the floor, we seem to be resting from the Sisyphean creative struggle. Only for a moment!


La lucha en todas las actividades artísticas

Franz West
Esculturas de Sísifo
Gagosian, Davies Street, Londres, Reino Unido
8 de junio – 27 de julio de 2018

En la mitología griega, Sísifo o Sisyphos fue el primer rey de Ephyra, que fue castigado por Zeus por su comportamiento engañoso y su orgullo, y obligado a rodar una pesada roca por una colina empinada, solo para que ruede cuando se acerca a la cima, repitiendo esta acción por toda la eternidad.

La última exposición de arte que hubo en la galería Gagosian de Londres del artista Franz West (Viena, 1947 – Viena, 2012) se refería al mito mencionado anteriormente. La muestra terminó la semana pasada, por lo que tendrás que ver estas obras de arte en otra galería o museo al que viajen. Pero, quería compartirlas contigo, porque creo que las esculturas son bonitas y me gustan las fotos resultantes de la interacción con las esculturas en este espacio.

Perteneciente a una generación de artistas expuestos al Actionist y Performance Art de los años 60 y 70, Franz West rechazó la idea de una relación pasiva entre obra de arte y espectador. Investigó la dicotomía entre lo privado y lo público, la acción y la reacción, tanto dentro como fuera de la galería, y utilizó materiales e imágenes cotidianas para examinar la relación del arte con la experiencia social.

El mito de Sísifo al que el artista se refirió con esta exposición en la galería Gagosian es una exploración de la frustración del proceso creativo, la lucha permanente que rodea a todas las actividades artísticas con las que los artistas y las personas creativas en general estamos tan familiarizados.

 

Las esculturas no convencionales de Franz West a menudo requieren la participación de la audiencia, por lo que son el ejemplo perfecto de obras de arte con las que nos gusta hacer un ‘performance’ a The art berries. Aquellas en los que el artista fomenta la interacción y no ve nuestro ‘perfomance’ como una interferencia en su trabajo. Habiendo dicho eso, creo que el público debería ser libre de interactuar con el arte y disfrutar del arte como le plazca, siempre y cuando se respeten las obras de arte. Y esa es de echo una de las misiones del proyecto The art berries.

Para las fotos que se muestran aquí, jugamos con las nociones de ocultar y mostrar que con frecuencia tocó el artista en su carrera. También al tumbarnos en el suelo parece que descansamos de la lucha creativa de Sísifo. Sólo por un momento!

Franz West - TheartblueberryFranz West - big sculpure

Art creation as an ongoing process

Past art shows: Giorgio Griffa. A continuos becoming.
Camden Arts Centre, London, UK.
26 January – 8 April 2018

We visited this art exhibition in March this year and got really inspired by the paintings presented by Giorgio Griffa (1936) at the Camden Art Centre. Griffa is an Italian abstract painter who lives and works in Turin and has been closely related to Arte Povera, which stands for ‘poor art’. This is a movement that appeared in Italy in the 1960s and with which artists sought to radically redefine painting by incorporating throwaway or ‘poor’ materials into their work.

Griffa believes in the ‘intelligence of painting’ and allows for every element of the process to influence and form his work, from the type of brush he uses to the nature of the canvas or the dilution of the pain.

Griffa’s approach is performative and time-base, as he assures that painting is “constant and never finished”.

 

His sources of inspiration are quantum energy, time-space mathematics, the golden ratio and the memory of visual experience since time immemorial. The body of work he presented at the Camden Arts Centre spans his career as an artist from the 1960s through to today and it was curated by artist and curator Stephen Nelson.

I found this exhibition visually striking and very much of my taste. The use of bold and primary colours over unstretched raw canvas was reinforced by the white background of the walls. As soon as I went through the door I felt I was entering the artist’s individual universe. The simple shapes and materials he uses on his paintings resonate with me; as if the artist had found a series of universal symbols and shared them with the rest of the world.

Performing as The art berries, we added another layer to these art exhibition and I dare to say that Griffa would approve of this addition to his work, not only for what it brought of improvisation and time-base performance, but also for the “constant and never finished” approach he likes to use on his paintings.

 

GG-CAC5

GG-CAC6

GG-CAC2

 

 

IMG_4444 (1)

 

 

The plasticity of a surreal dream

Past shows: Karla Black, Stuart Shave/Modern Art
17 Nov – 16 Dec 2017

We attended this exhibition in November last year and really liked discovering Karla Black’s new body of work. With this exhibition she attempted to emphasise the importance of mark-making in her practice, which combined with colour and light connects her sculptural practice to painting.

Moreover, she concentrated specifically on one of the many sculptural problems that preoccupies her: how to preserve the precious, formal aesthetic decisions she makes, within the precariousness of the informal materials she favours. Many of the works in the exhibition were conceived and realised within the gallery space. As she’s asserted in the past, her sculpture is absolutely non-representational.

“There is no image, no metaphor,” Karla Black said.

In the first room, there were free standing sculptures made of Vaseline mixed with paint, then sealed between glass screens. In addition, we found hanging sculptures in the same materials and in clay, wool and spray paint across the whole show. In the second room, there were floor artworks of a pink fluff material and thin sculptures made of Johnson’s baby oil bottles, crystal glasses and wax.

Karla Black lives and works in Glasgow. She was born in Alexandria, United Kingdom in 1972, and completed an MA in Fine Art at the Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, in 2004. In 2011, Black’s work represented Scotland at the 54th Venice Biennale, and was the same year nominated for the Turner Prize. Her work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at multiple galleries in the UK and abroad.

Black’s works for this exhibition were fragile and evocative. The plasticity of the materials she used for this exhibition, as well as the pastel and shinny colours she employed on most of these artworks remain in my mind as part of a surreal dream.

 

image3

 

 

 

 

image4image6

 

 

 

 

IMG_4238 (1)