The language of cities

Sarah Morris
17 April 2019 – 30 June 2019
White Cube Bermondsey, London, UK

This is one of the last exhibitions I’ve seen and I wanted to share a few comments and photos that we took there with you here.

White Cube Bermondsey is now displaying the work of Sarah Morris (1967), an artist born in the UK, who lives in New York City (US). The art show, formed mostly by abstract paintings, reflects on the artist’s interest in networks, typologies, architecture, language and the city. Morris plays with the viewer’s sense of visual recognition, often referencing elements of architecture, but also the graphic identity of multinational corporations, the iconography of maps, GPS technology, as well as the movement of people within urban environments.

For instance, her new series of ‘Sound Graph’ paintings use the language of American abstraction, minimalism and pop art, while the forms are derived from the artist’s sound files, using the speech from audio recordings as a starting point for the compositions. You can see me (the art blueberry) interacting with one of these paintings ‘Reality is its own ideology (Sound Graph)’ below. The inherent movement in these pictures responds to the theme of the painting that comes from an audio recording.

There’s also an artwork that occupies a separate room and includes Morris’s first sculpture, titled ‘What can be explained can also be predicted (2019)’. It’s made of modular, glass tubes of various heights and colours over a colourful plinth that reminded me of city skyscrapers, but they are also like a musical instrument. It’s a phallic and architectonic sculpture at the same time. 

Morris’ work is full references to the cities we inhabit these days. A constantly evolving network of visual, social and political connections that make cities full of vibrancy and energy, always opening space for change and innovation.


 

El lenguaje de las ciudades

Sarah Morris
17 de abril de 2019 – 30 de junio de 2019
White Cube Bermondsey, Londres, Reino Unido

Esta es una de las últimas exposiciones de arte que he visto y quería compartir algunos comentarios y fotos que hicimos allí con vosotros.

White Cube Bermondsey muestra ahora el trabajo de Sarah Morris (1967), una artista nacida en el Reino Unido que vive en Nueva York (USA). La muestra de arte, formada principalmente por pinturas abstractas, refleja el interés de la artista en las redes, las tipologías, la arquitectura, el idioma y la ciudad. Morris juega con el reconocimiento visual del espectador, haciendo referencia a menudo  a elementos de la arquitectura, pero también a la identidad gráfica de corporaciones multinacionales, a la iconografía de los mapas, a la tecnología GPS, así como al movimiento de personas en entornos urbanos.

Por ejemplo, su nueva serie de pinturas ‘Sound Graph’ utiliza el lenguaje de la abstracción estadounidense, el minimalismo y el arte pop, mientras que las formas se derivan de los archivos de sonido de la artista, utilizando grabaciones de audio como punto de partida para las composiciones. Puedes verme (The art blueberry) interactuar con una de estas pinturas “Realidad es su propia ideología (Sound Graph)” a continuación. El movimiento inherente en estas imágenes responde al tema de esta pintura que se deriva de una grabación de audio.

También hay una obra de arte que ocupa una habitación separada e incluye la primera escultura de Morris, titulada “Lo que se puede explicar también se puede predecir (2019)”. Está hecha de tubos de vidrio modulares de varias alturas y colores sobre un colorido zócalo que me recuerda a los rascacielos de muchas ciudades, pero también es como un instrumento musical. Es una escultura fálica y arquitectónica a la vez. 

La obra de Morris está llena de referencias a las ciudades que habitamos en estos días. Una red en constante evolución de conexiones visuales, sociales y políticas que hacen que las ciudades estén llenas de vitalidad y energía, siempre abriendo espacio para el cambio y la innovación.

Sarah Morris_WC_Theartblueberry2Sarah Morris_WC_Theartblueberry1

The rat king with monkeys

NS Harsha
11 April – 18 May
Victoria Miro Gallery I, London

The art berries visited this art exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery and we’d like to share a few photos here despite the show is now finished. I’m sure you’ll be able to see more work from NS Harsha  in another big city sometime soon.

The artwork we focused on is “Tamasha” (2013), an installation of larger-than-life size monkeys that appear onto a scaffolding structure. The monkeys are pointing upwards to the heavens while their tails are intertwined and tied to each other. The word Tamasha can refer to political upheaval or even human folly. Moreover, Harsha refers to the phenomenon of the rat king and its appearance in northern folklore traditions since the sixteenth century, where rat kings are associated with various superstitions and were often seen as a bad omen for being associated with plagues.

See The art blackberry below interacting with this artwork pointing to the heavens and placing herself next to the scaffolding, where the monkeys are suspended and tether to each other. Since monkeys are our ancestors, it seems plausible to me to take part on this installation :-P.

NS Harsha (born 1969) is an Indian artist born and based in Mysore. He works in many media including painting, sculpture, site-specific installation, and public works. His works “depict daily experiences in Mysore, southern India, where he is based, but also reflect wider cultural, political and economic globalization issues” and explore the “absurdity of the real world, representation and abstraction, and repeating images”. His practice has been inspired by Indian popular and miniature painting. (Source: Wikipedia).


 

El rey de las ratas con monos

NS Harsha
11 de abril – 18 de mayo
Victoria Miro Gallery I, Londres

The art berries visitamos esta exposición de arte en la galería Victoria Miró y nos gustaría compartir algunas fotos aquí a pesar de que la muestra ya ha terminado. Estoy segura de que pronto podrás ver más trabajos de NS Harsha en otra gran ciudad dentro de poco.

La obra de arte en la que nos enfocamos es “Tamasha” (2013), una instalación de monos de tamaño más grande que en la realidad que aparecen en una estructura de andamios. Los monos apuntan hacia el cielo mientras que sus colas están entrelazadas y unidas entre sí. La palabra Tamasha puede referirse a agitación política o incluso locura humana. Además, Harsha se refiere al fenómeno del rey de las ratas y su aparición en las tradiciones populares del norte desde el siglo XVI, donde los reyes de las ratas se asocian con varias supersticiones y se consideran a menudo como un mal presagio por estar asociados con plagas.

Debajo puedes ver a The art blackberry interactuando con esta obra de arte y apuntando al cielo, mientras se pega a los andamios donde los monos están suspendidos y atados entre sí. Dado que los monos son nuestros antepasados, me parece plausible participar en esta instalación :-P.

NS Harsha (nacido en 1969) es un artista indio nacido y residente en Mysore. Trabaja en muchos medios, como pintura, escultura, instalación específica del sitio y obras públicas. Sus trabajos “representan experiencias cotidianas en Mysore, en el sur de la India, donde se basa, pero también reflejan temas más amplios de globalización cultural, política y económica” y exploran el “absurdo del mundo real, la representación y la abstracción, y la repetición de imágenes”. Su práctica se ha inspirado en la pintura popular y en miniatura de la India. (Fuente: Wikipedia).

NS Harsha_Theartblacberryfurther

A master of serious play

Franz West
20 February – 2 June 2019
Tate Modern, London, UK

Tate Modern is currently hosting an art exhibition of Franz West that The art berries visited recently and I would like to share with you, our pictures and my views on the show.

I have previously covered on this blog an exhibition about Franz West that was at the Gagosian art gallery in Davies street last summer. And as I mentioned previously, West’s unconventional sculptures often look for an involvement from the audience. Hence, his artworks are the best example of art we like to interact with, and artists we admire with regards to his approach to art. Read more about West on “The struggle in all artistic pursuits” post.

As you enter the art exhibition, you come across the “Passstücke” or “Adaptives”, plaster sculptures with embedded found objects that could be picked and interact with, just as he did with his friends as you can see nearby on videos. I took my chance to play with them and enjoyed the go. Take a look at the photos below in which I dress in black and interact with white sculptures in imaginary fitting rooms where you can even close the curtains and gain more privacy. I didn’t feel the need to hide though 😉

Further down the show, we came across his “Legitimate Sculptures”, papier-mâché clumps made with everyday objects like a hat or a broom, and painted in some areas but raw in others. They were evocative of bodies, but more abstract than figurative in my view. He even played with furniture, as we can appreciate with the carpet-covered settees. Art to be sat on and have a space for conversation.

In his final years apparently he created large, brightly coloured sculptures both for galleries and public spaces, some of which can be seen outside the Tate gallery.

I like Franz West’ irreverent and playful approach to art. His sculptures were a turning point in the relationship between art and its audience, and I wish there were more artist like him.


 

Un maestro del juego serio

Franz West
20 de febrero – 2 de junio de 2019.
Tate Modern, Londres, Reino Unido

Tate Modern está mostrando ahora una exposición de arte de Franz West que The art berries visitamos recientemente y me gustaría compartir aquí; nuestras fotos y mis opiniones sobre la muestra.

Ya cubrí en este blog una exposición sobre Franz West que estuvo en la galería de arte de Gagosian en Davies Street el verano pasado. Y como mencioné anteriormente, las esculturas no convencionales de West a menudo buscan una participación de la audiencia. Por lo tanto, sus obras de arte son el mejor ejemplo de arte con el que nos gusta interactuar y de artistas que admiramos con respecto al enfoque de su trabajo. Lee más sobre West en la publicación “La lucha en todas las actividades artísticas“.

Al entrar en la exposición de arte, te encuentras con los “Passstücke” o “Adaptives”, esculturas de yeso con objetos encontrados incrustados con los que puedes interactuar, tal como hizo el artista con sus amigos como puedes ver en videos cercanos. Aproveché la oportunidad para jugar con ellos y disfruté haciéndolo. Echa un vistazo a las fotos a continuación en las que voy vestida de negro e interactúo con esculturas blancas en espacios separados por cortinas, donde incluso puede cerrarlas y obtener más privacidad. Aunque yo no sentí la necesidad de esconderme 😉

Más abajo en la exposición, encontramos sus “Esculturas legítimas”, grupos de papel-maché hechos con objetos cotidianos como un sombrero o una escoba, y pintados en algunas áreas, pero crudos en otras. Eran evocadores de cuerpos, pero más abstractos que figurativos desde mi punto de vista. West jugaba incluso con los muebles, como podemos apreciar con los divanes cubiertos de alfombras. El arte para sentarse y tener un espacio para conversar.

Al parecer, en sus últimos años creó grandes esculturas de colores brillantes tanto para galerías como para espacios públicos, algunas de las cuales se pueden ver fuera de la galería Tate.

Me gusta el enfoque irreverente y juguetón de Franz West en el arte. Sus esculturas fueron un punto de inflexión en la relación entre el arte y su público, y desearía que hubiera más artistas como él.

Franz West-TAB-two roomsFranz West-TAB-TheartblueberrydownFranz West-TAB-TheartblueberryupFranz West-TAB-TheartblackberrysittingFranz West-TAB-Theartblackberryhair